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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Alexandros Psychogios

The aim of this paper is to theoretically explore the concept of leadership in a Total Quality Management (TQM) context by developing a new theoretical framework of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to theoretically explore the concept of leadership in a Total Quality Management (TQM) context by developing a new theoretical framework of understanding Total Quality Leadership (TQL) as well as by opening the dialogue in researching further key elements of TQL.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach that the paper adopts is conceptual. Based on exploration of the wider management and leadership literature of empirical and theoretical studies, this paper develops a framework of TQL.

Findings

The suggested TQL framework is composed by three main pillars, namely the proactive, adaptive and the relational. The former consists of elements like anticipation of current business environment complexities and filtering of information that enhances practice decision making. The second pillar refers to adaptation, autonomy and feedback while the last one emphasises on the importance of aspects like social interactions, engagement and empathy. The paper explains why the specific pillars with the additional elements are critical for TQM success.

Originality/value

Given the tremendous challenges that organisations face due to increased complexity and demanding competition of the business environments globally, the role of leadership as the major “soft” aspect of TQM approach, seems to be vital more than ever. But the type of TQL appropriate to enhance total quality success nowadays, is still (and should be) under continuous exploration. This conceptual study attempts to provide new theoretical insights of TQL as well as to open the dialogue around the main elements consisting of TQL and how the future research agenda is formulated.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Rea Prouska, Alexandros G. Psychogios and Yllka Rexhepi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of total reward practices in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the South-Eastern European (SEE) region…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of total reward practices in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the South-Eastern European (SEE) region and the reward elements positively affecting organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 199 SMEs operating in SEE countries which are either under economic crisis or transition: Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Albania, Kosovo and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

Findings

SMEs in the SEE region are implementing a total rewards model which is characterised by a weaker application of individual aspects and by a stronger application of transactional, relational and communal aspects. Within the communal aspects of the model, the study found three elements of the work environment that positively affect organisational performance; work-life balance, employee involvement voice mechanisms, and organisational culture supporting personal and professional development.

Practical implications

The study contributes to HR practice; the authors found that a better work environment is positively related to improved organisational performance in these SMEs. This means that in times of economic crisis or transition when HR budgets are limited such non-financial strategies can be a viable alternative to costly financial rewards to such organisations.

Originality/value

The study contributes to both theory and HR practice by shedding light on how employee rewards are affected in economies under crisis and transition, how SMEs can motivate their employees when faced with significant financial limitations, as well as explores which reward elements can lead to enhanced organisational performance in such organisations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Alexandros Psychogios, Feim Blakcori, Leslie Szamosi and Nicholas O’Regan

The purpose of this paper is to explore and theorize the process of managerial feedback in relation to change in small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and theorize the process of managerial feedback in relation to change in small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This research embraces a qualitative methodology in the context of manufacturing SMEs. Drawing on 30 in-depth interviews, and observations conducted with various managers in six SMEs operating in three countries, it is argued that managers benefit more by using daily, ongoing, feedback as a trigger of change in their organizations.

Findings

The findings suggest that there is an overall view that managers appear to be reluctant to change existing processes using formalized feedback mechanisms, which runs counter-intuitive to the literature. In contrast, informal methods of feedback work better in enhancing organizational change. Moreover, another two features of feedback enhance this process, namely, benefits oriented and confidence oriented. As such, this study contributes to existing knowledge and practice by proposing a three-fold form of feedback through which managers expand their perspectives of feedback from feeding-back to feeding-forward thereby enhancing the opportunities of triggering change.

Research limitations/implications

Feedback should merely be considered as a dynamic and socially constructed managerial practice. A practice where actors not only exchange information and share knowledge, but also act, react and interact with each other as they constantly rethinking the change process. The proposed aspect of feedback emphasizes knowledge therapeutically and in combination with the dialogical discourse (practical illustration) that increases the odds for capturing change as a natural, rather than exceptional.

Practical implications

Practitioners, as such, may wish to consider the terminology used when it comes to studying change and its implementation in a crisis context. Using deformalized managerial feedback mechanisms to tackle a formal phenomenon like “change” could help avoid employees perceiving a negative connotation, causing resistance or confusion and feeling threatened. Therefore, the authors suggest that practitioners, during development initiatives on modernizing or altering organizational processes, consider replacing the term “change” as a formal concept.

Originality/value

It is an investigation from an exploratory perspective in studying and understanding the causes, factors and modalities that trigger managerial feedback toward organizational change in manufacturing SMEs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Kostas Selviaridis, Aristides Matopoulos, Leslie Thomas Szamosi and Alexandros Psychogios

The purpose of this paper is to understand how reverse resource exchanges and resource dependencies are managed in the service supply chain (SSC) of returnable transport…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how reverse resource exchanges and resource dependencies are managed in the service supply chain (SSC) of returnable transport packaging (RTP).

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study was conducted in the context of automotive logistics focusing on the RTP SSC. Data were collected through 16 interviews, primarily with managers of a logistics service provider (LSP) and document analysis of contractual agreements with key customers of the packaging service.

Findings

Resource dependencies among actors in the SSC result from the importance of the RTP for the customer’s production processes, the competition among users for RTP and the negative implications of the temporary unavailability of RTP for customers and the LSP (in terms of service performance). Amongst other things, the LSP is dependent on its customers and third-party users (e.g. the customer’s suppliers) for the timely return of package resources. The role of inter-firm integration and collaboration, formal contracts as well as customers’ power and influence over third-party RTP users are stressed as key mechanisms for managing LSP’s resource dependencies.

Research limitations/implications

A resource dependence theory (RDT) lens is used to analyse how reverse resource exchanges and associated resource dependencies in SSCs are managed, thus complementing the existing SSC literature emphasising the bi-directionality of resource flows. The study also extends the recent SSC literature stressing the role of contracting by empirically demonstrating how formal contracts can be mobilised to explicate resource dependencies and to specify, and regulate, reverse exchanges in the SSC.

Practical implications

The research suggests that logistics providers can effectively manage their resource dependencies and regulate reverse exchanges in the SSC by deploying contractual governance mechanisms and leveraging their customers’ influence over third-party RTP users.

Originality/value

The study is novel in its application of RDT, which enhances our understanding of the management of reverse exchanges and resource dependencies in SSCs.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Thomas Hoyland, Alexandros Psychogios, Olga Epitropaki, Jonathan Damiani, Sumona Mukhuty and Chris Priestnall

Drawing on the social-cognitive and motivational literature of leadership, the present study examines the influence of young adults' self-perceptions of leadership on…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the social-cognitive and motivational literature of leadership, the present study examines the influence of young adults' self-perceptions of leadership on their leadership self-efficacy (LSE) and motivation to lead (MTL) in their future career. The authors further examine gender and socio-economic status (SES) as important moderators of the proposed relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The present investigation consists of a two-study research design, based on data collected from young adult samples across two culturally different countries, namely the UK (N = 267) and Japan (N = 127).

Findings

The study presents evidence of self-perceptions of leadership influencing LSE and MTL. The results further support the mediating role of leader self-efficacy. Regarding the moderating role of gender, results in both samples showed that the effects of leader self-efficacy on MTL were stronger for males. SES was found to moderate the effects of leadership self-perceptions of negative implicit leadership theories (ILTs) on LSE in the UK sample and the effects of leadership self-perceptions of positive ILTs on LSE in the Japanese sample.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap of empirical research focused on early adulthood influences on leadership development. In particular, this study has a three-fold contribution, by, firstly, developing a conceptual model that examines the role of young adults' self-perceptions of leadership on their self-efficacy as leaders and MTL; secondly examining contingencies of the proposed relationships; and thirdly testing the conceptual model in two countries.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Loukas K Tsironis and Alexandros G. Psychogios

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a multiple case-study approach, of three companies, in order to identify the factors affecting Lean Six Sigma (L6σ) implementation in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a multiple case-study approach, of three companies, in order to identify the factors affecting Lean Six Sigma (L6σ) implementation in service industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data were collected through companies’ documents, written procedures and quality assurance policies. Primary data were collected through a number of in-depth interviews with managers and quality experts.

Findings

The analysis of qualitative data gathered through in-depth interviews with managers in all three cases resulted in the emergence of variety of critical success factors (CSFs) regarding L6σ implementation in service industry. As it can be seen the great majority of the factors have been identified in all three cases. Moreover the analysis shows that there are two categories of factors emerged.

Originality/value

This study has four major contributions. First, it provides an intergraded multi-factor framework regarding the implementation of L6σ in service industry. In particular, this study contributes with three more particular factors that influence the implementation of L6σ in services, namely, top-management active involvement, HR support activities, and practices and systems. Second, it focusses on the responses of managers, who play the critical role in the adoption of L6σ. Third, supports and expands current literature on the key success factors of L6σ application. Finally, it provides future ideas to explore and develop more the suggested L6σ framework.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Alexandros G. Psychogios

This paper aims to address the generic research question of how promising management practices such as total quality management (TQM) initiatives affect employee relations…

1763

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the generic research question of how promising management practices such as total quality management (TQM) initiatives affect employee relations in South Eastern European (SEE) countries by focusing on managers' professional lives. In particular, this study focuses on the effects of TQM programmes on middle managers' (MMs') career prospects and job security.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐modal research approach was applied based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. A total of 1,800 middle managers from 73 service organizations in both the public and private sectors participated in the research (19 and 54 respectively).

Findings

The implementation of TQM programs was found to have a positive impact on MMs' careers and job security. Nevertheless, it was related mostly to the “hard”, rather than the “soft”, side of TQM. The strong impact of TQM practices on MMs' responses to various aspects related to their physical work, as compared to the small impact of the “soft” side, implies a more pragmatic view of restructuring of the employment relations covenant due to the application of management models in SEE region.

Research limitations/implications

The business literature has presented limited measurement tools for the “soft” and “hard” aspects of TQM. This paper provides a new, more reliable, and valid measurement of both sides of TQM. More research is required in order to further verify the use of such a measurement tool.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware of a somewhat more linear path to career progression and job security through the use of “hard” quality management practices while anticipating less importance to be given to concepts such as empowerment and employee involvement.

Originality/value

This study expands our understanding of how industrial relations can be formed from the application of promising management practices. In particular, it argues that managers' familiarity with the “hard” side of TQM seems to both positively and negatively influence career development and job security, while being influenced by employment sector and educational background.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Alexandros G. Psychogios

This paper aims to increase understanding of the application of total quality management (TQM) initiatives in business environments that differ from those where it…

1153

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to increase understanding of the application of total quality management (TQM) initiatives in business environments that differ from those where it emerged. Organisations within such environments, which are often less developed, may wish to adopt relatively sophisticated initiatives such as TQM. The adoption of TQM programmes by a variety of private and public sector organisations in South Eastern Europe (SEE) is a prime example. Little has been said about the awareness and applicability of TQM in this region.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of quantitative and qualitative research approaches was used. The quantitative results emerged from the investigation of 782 managers working in 123 service organisations in public and private sectors (51 and 72 respectively) in four major SEE countries, namely Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria, and Greece. Subsequently, for triangulation and to provide richer data, 34 follow‐up semi‐structured interviews were conducted with managers from these four countries.

Findings

After having carried out quantitative and qualitative analyses, a four‐fold model emerged, through which key features of the application of TQM practices in the SEE region could be explained. The components of the model are categorised in two major groups; first, the influences of the business/management culture and modernisation pressures, and second, two key aspects of the business systems – the education level of managers and the sector of employment.

Research limitations/implications

Both cultural and structural features of the business systems in SEE create pressures either promoting or retarding TQM adoption within organisations. The paper provides a four‐fold factors model that aims to explain key regional‐specific issues related to TQM adoption. This approach provides insights into the region studied, but also provides a prototype for similar studies in other regions.

Practical implications

In the SEE context, the tension between traditional business/management culture and modernisation logic is the key to the evolution of TQM. SEE managers adopt a more pragmatic view of TQM application through the use of “hard” quality management systems and practices, while placing less importance on concepts such as empowerment and employee involvement.

Originality/value

The study argues for the adoption of a regional‐specific view of TQM, applicable to particular regional business systems.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Alexandros G. Psychogios, Leslie T. Szamosi and Geoffrey Wood

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the employment relations context in South Eastern Europe from a variety of capitalism perspectives. Particular attention is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the employment relations context in South Eastern Europe from a variety of capitalism perspectives. Particular attention is accorded to the uneven nature of change at both the levels of institutions and practice. This is followed by a review of the individual papers that make up this special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is primarily a theoretical one, providing a review of the papers that make up this special issue and giving an overview of the foundation being provided.

Findings

While the term “transitional” has often been deployed to describe employment relations across the region, the process has been an extremely protracted one. There is little doubt that the nature and form of employment relations in the countries encompassed in this review is still coalescing, with further ruptures likely as a result of the 2009 depression. At the same time, the papers in this special issue point to long‐standing continuities with employment.

Research limitations/implications

While the papers that make up this special issue may present the most recent research in the region, they also point to future areas for research. First, there is particularly little research that has been undertaken on peripheral areas of a generally peripheral region. Not only do we know very little about, say, Albanian employment relations, but we know little about employment relations in peripheral areas of large countries such as Turkey. Second, the 2009 depression is likely to accelerate trends to downsizing and insecure work, in the short term at least. Finally, there is a growing consensus that a sustainable economic recovery from the current crisis will depend, at least in part, on new social compromises both globally and regionally.

Practical implications

Employment relations in the region are undergoing an extended transition. In the short term, the most likely trend will be towards a further weakening of the bargaining position of employees, and towards more insecure working. However, a sustained recovery is likely to see a reversal of this, with employers being more likely to be forced to contemplate new social compromises.

Originality/value

This study applies the comparative capitalism literature to the South Eastern European region context. It also introduces some of the most recent applied research in the region.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Alexandros G. Psychogios, Jane Atanasovski and Loukas K. Tsironis

The purpose of this paper is to investigate issues related to the application of Lean Six Sigma (L6σ) in a service industry. By adopting a case‐study approach this paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate issues related to the application of Lean Six Sigma (L6σ) in a service industry. By adopting a case‐study approach this paper analytically explores the critical success factors that affect L6σ implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative approach attempting to explore the nature of L6σ application in a service context. In particular, two case studies from the telecommunications industry have been selected. Secondary data were collected through an analysis of companies' documents, written procedures and quality assurance policies. Moreover, primary data were collected through a number of interviews with managers and quality experts.

Findings

There are particular factors that influence the implementation of L6σ in organizations, that can be distinguished in facilitators like Top Management Involvement & Support, Quality‐driven Organizational Culture, Quality‐driven Training, Top Down & Bottom Up Project Selection, Customer Satisfaction, Prior implementation of other quality improvement programs and Supportive Performance Management & IT Systems, and inhibitors such as Lack of Awareness for L6σ, Lack of Awareness for the Need of Continuous Quality Improvement Programs & L6σ, Lack of Strategic Orientation, Working Mentality & Habits.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the study is the fact that in both cases only managers and top administrators were approached. Frontline employees who are directly involved in L6σ approach may offer a clearer view on issues related to the impact of critical factors on L6σ application.

Originality/value

This study has four major advantages. First, it expands our understanding regarding the implementation of L6σ in a service industry, in which the application of management models is more complex and problematic. Second, it focuses on the responses of managers, who always play the most significant role in the adoption of such techniques. Third, it explores the quality management initiatives in the telecommunications industry. Finally, it provides future studies with a L6σ multi‐factor application approach that can be further tested and developed.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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