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1 – 10 of 491
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Alexander Weiss and Robert F. Boruch

Evaluations of criminal justice policy increasingly employ randomized experiements, especially in studies of policing. These experiments, however, raise important ethical…

577

Abstract

Evaluations of criminal justice policy increasingly employ randomized experiements, especially in studies of policing. These experiments, however, raise important ethical, legal and practical issues. This paper explores some of these issues as viewed by police officers. It focuses on the Milwaukee Domestic Violence Experiment.

Details

Police Studies: Intnl Review of Police Development, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0141-2949

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Alexander Weiss and Sally Freels

Reports on a field experiment in Dayton, Ohio, where the police department has no specialized traffic division, hence traffic enforcement is part of the routine…

6630

Abstract

Reports on a field experiment in Dayton, Ohio, where the police department has no specialized traffic division, hence traffic enforcement is part of the routine assignment. Aims to measure the effects of traffic law enforcement on crime, arrests and traffic accidents. Presents data covering all index arrests and special arrests involving weapons, drugs and offenders driving under influence, plus all reported traffic accidents. Contrary to other research, fails to detect a relationship between traffic enforcement and crime. Investigates possible reasons for this.

Details

American Journal of Police, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0735-8547

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Alexander Weiss

Reports on the innovations process in American policing. Explores how information about innovation is communicated among police organizations and the factors which…

1739

Abstract

Reports on the innovations process in American policing. Explores how information about innovation is communicated among police organizations and the factors which influence adoption. Reports the findings of a survey of police chiefs and executives. Develops a model with four elements: cosmopolitanism; risk mediation; peer emulation; and innovativeness. Finds that many police departments use informal networks of communication to support organizational decision making and are often influenced by executives’ participation in policy communities and by efforts to reduce the organization’s perceived risk of civil liability. Recommends that police organizations strengthen their networks of communication in a more formal manner.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Peter C. Kratcoski and Dilip K. Das

A total of 70 representatives from all continents of the world discussed the challenges of “traffic policing” in the twenty‐first century at the 7th Annual Meeting of the…

2856

Abstract

A total of 70 representatives from all continents of the world discussed the challenges of “traffic policing” in the twenty‐first century at the 7th Annual Meeting of the International Police Executive Symposium. Apart from the problems with which they have been confronted, the representatives also explained the proposed plans in their countries for finding solutions to them. There were many similar problems and similar solutions. But countries also differed from one another in many respects, reflecting their culture, economic conditions, political priorities, historical developments and other factors.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

François Fulconis, Gilles Pache and Emmanuelle Reynaud

The paper aims to introduce the issue of supply chain management in the context of increasingly rare and costly resources and to define the notion of frugal supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to introduce the issue of supply chain management in the context of increasingly rare and costly resources and to define the notion of frugal supply chain, in particular, in reference to the development of circular economy. The challenges of frugal supply chain are detailed for a set of private and public stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

As a programmatic viewpoint, this paper aims at developing debates regarding the future of supply chains, building upon current technical and managerial innovations.

Findings

Frugal supply chains constitute a new business perspective. It transforms the way value creation process is considered, in reference to the models of circular economy, and the systems in which companies evolve. The circular economy represents many opportunities for new forms of growth in the context of rare resources, and it raises several challenges for a variety of stakeholders, more or less, involved in the management of closed loop supply chains.

Practical implications

Frugal strategies in a supply chain context may provide both a source of competitive advantage for companies and an enhancement of their commitment to society.

Social implications

The practices described in the paper aim at stimulating a new view of logistics management, based on the principles of sustainable development. Frugal supply chains offer the possibility of reflecting on a more moderate, sensible and effective use of several commons by taking part in the conservation of rare resources for future generations.

Originality/value

This viewpoint introduces the concept of frugal supply chains, rarely approached in the literature, and it offers the opportunity to open debates on managerial and societal challenges linked to logistics strategies and, more broadly, to inter-organizational relations.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Peter O’Meara, Gary Wingrove and Michael Nolan

In North America, delegated practice “medical direction” models are often used as a proxy for clinical quality and safety in paramedic services. Other developed countries…

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Abstract

Purpose

In North America, delegated practice “medical direction” models are often used as a proxy for clinical quality and safety in paramedic services. Other developed countries favor a combination of professional regulatory boards and clinical governance frameworks that feature paramedics taking lead clinician roles. The purpose of this paper is to bring together the evidence for medical direction and clinical governance in paramedic services through the prism of paramedic self-regulation.

Design/methodology/approach

This narrative synthesis critically examines the long-established North American Emergency Medical Services medical direction model and makes some comparisons with the UK inspired clinical governance approaches that are used to monitor and manage the quality and safety in several other Anglo-American paramedic services. The databases searched were CINAHL and Medline, with Google Scholar used to capture further publications.

Findings

Synthesis of the peer-reviewed literature found little high quality evidence supporting the effectiveness of medical direction. The literature on clinical governance within paramedic services described a systems approach with shared responsibility for quality and safety. Contemporary paramedic clinical leadership papers in developed countries focus on paramedic professionalization and the self-regulation of paramedics.

Originality/value

The lack of strong evidence supporting medical direction of the paramedic profession in developed countries challenges the North American model of paramedics practicing as a companion profession to medicine under delegated practice model. This model is inconsistent with the international vision of paramedicine as an autonomous, self-regulated health profession.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2022

Alexander Serenko and A. Mohammed Abubakar

This study aims to propose and test a model explicating the antecedents and consequences of knowledge sabotage.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose and test a model explicating the antecedents and consequences of knowledge sabotage.

Design/methodology/approach

Data obtained from 330 employees working in the Turkish retail and telecommunication sectors were analyzed by means of the Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling technique.

Findings

Co-worker knowledge sabotage is the key factor driving knowledge sabotage behavior of individual employees, followed by co-worker incivility. Interactional justice suppresses individual knowledge sabotage, while supervisor incivility does not affect it. Co-worker knowledge sabotage reduces job satisfaction of other employees, which, in turn, triggers their voluntary turnover intention. Contrary to a popular belief that perpetrators generally benefit from their organizational misbehavior, the findings indicate that knowledge saboteurs suffer from the consequences of their action because they find it mentally difficult to stay in their current organization. Employees understate their own knowledge sabotage engagement and/or overstate that of others.

Practical implications

Managers should realize that interactional justice is an important mechanism that can thwart knowledge sabotage behavior, promote a civil organizational culture, develop proactive approaches to reduce co-worker incivility and strive towards a zero rate of knowledge sabotage incidents in their organizations. Co-worker incivility and co-worker knowledge sabotage in the workplace are possible inhibitors of intraorganizational knowledge flows and are starting points for job dissatisfaction, which may increase workers’ turnover intention.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to further our knowledge on the cognitive mechanisms linking interactional justice and uncivil organizational behavior with knowledge sabotage and employee outcomes.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2014

Alexander I. Stingl

An inquiry into the constitution of the experience of patienthood. It understands “becoming a patient” as a production of a subjectivity, in other words as a process of…

Abstract

Purpose

An inquiry into the constitution of the experience of patienthood. It understands “becoming a patient” as a production of a subjectivity, in other words as a process of individuation and milieu that occurs through an ontology of production. This ontology of production can, of course, also be understood as a political ontology. Therefore, this is, first of all, an inquiry into a mode of production, and, secondly, an inquiry into its relation to the issue of social justice – because of effects of digital divisions. In these terms, it also reflects on how expert discourses, such as in medical sociology and science studies (STS), can (and do) articulate their problems.

Approach

An integrative mode of discourse analysis, strongly related to discursive institutionalism, called semantic agency theory: it considers those arrangements (institutions, informal organizations, networks, collectivities, etc.) and assemblages (intellectual equipment, vernacular epistemologies, etc.) that are constitutive of how the issue of “patient experience” can be articulated form its position within an ontology of production.

Findings

The aim not being the production of a finite result, what is needed is a shift in how “the construction of patient experience” is produced by expert discourses. While the inquiry is not primarily an empirical study and is also limited to “Western societies,” it emphasizes that there is a relation between political ontologies (including the issues of social justice) and the subjectivities that shape the experiences of people in contemporary health care systems, and, finally, that this relation is troubled by the effects of the digital divide(s).

Originality

A proposal “to interrogate and trouble” some innovative extensions and revisions – even though it will not be able to speculate about matters of degree – to contemporary theories of biomedicalization, patienthood, and managed care.

Details

Mediations of Social Life in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-222-7

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

John H. Humphreys, Milorad M. Novicevic, Stephanie S. Pane Haden and Md. Kamrul Hasan

Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018) presented a persuasive argument for recognizing the concept of enabling leadership as a critical form of leadership for adaptive organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018) presented a persuasive argument for recognizing the concept of enabling leadership as a critical form of leadership for adaptive organizations. This study aims to narratively explore the concept of enabling leadership in the context of social complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore how leaders enable adaptive processes, Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018) called for future research using in-depth case studies of social actors centered on emergence in complex environments. In this in-depth case study, the authors pursue theory elaboration by using a form of analytically structured history process to analyze primary and secondary sources.

Findings

During archival research of Whitney Young, Jr’s largely overlooked and misunderstood leadership in the historic social drama of the 1960s US civil rights movement, the authors discovered compelling evidence to support and extend the theoretical arguments advanced by Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018).

Research limitations/implications

The reflexivity associated with interpretive case approaches confronts the issue of subjectivism. The authors ask readers to judge the credibility of their arguments accordingly.

Originality/value

Using a relational leadership-as-practice lens, the authors interpret the dramaturgical performance Whitney Young, Jr directed to facilitate coherent emancipatory dialogue, affect the social construction of power relations and enable the adaptive space needed for social transformation to emerge.

Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Johnrev Guilaran and Hong An Nguyen

Disaster responders play a crucial role in providing aid to individuals and communities following catastrophic events. Being tasked to protect and preserve life and…

Abstract

Disaster responders play a crucial role in providing aid to individuals and communities following catastrophic events. Being tasked to protect and preserve life and property, these groups of professionals are constantly exposed to various hazards, which puts them at risk of negative mental health consequences. This chapter describes and discusses these mental health effects and interventions for disaster responders in Southeast Asia. The chapter defines who the disaster responders are in Southeast Asian countries. Drawing from the literature, this chapter enumerates the various positive and negative psychological consequences of disaster response, and the risk and protective factors associated with disaster response work. This chapter also describes the different interventions, such as psychological first aid and psychotherapy, following the Inter-agency Standing Committee (IASC) (2007) guidelines on conducting mental health and psychosocial support services (MHPSS), and focusing on the Southeast Asian context. This chapter ends with a discussion of the different challenges of providing MHPSS in Southeast Asia and with some recommendations on how to improve the delivery of these services and the mental health of disaster responders in general.

Details

Resistance, Resilience, and Recovery from Disasters: Perspectives from Southeast Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-791-1

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