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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Karl Werder and Alexander Maedche

Agile software development helps software producing organizations to respond to manifold challenges. While prior research focused on agility as a project or process…

Abstract

Purpose

Agile software development helps software producing organizations to respond to manifold challenges. While prior research focused on agility as a project or process phenomenon, the authors suggest that agility is an emergent phenomenon on the team level. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the theory of complex adaptive systems (CASs), the study captures the multiple influencing levels of software development teams (SDTs) and their interplay with self-organization and emergence. The authors investigate three agile SDTs in different contextual environments that participate with four or more different roles each.

Findings

The results suggest self-organization as a central process when understanding team agility. While contextual factors often provide restriction on self-organization, they can help the team to enhance its autonomy.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical contributions result from the development and test of theory grounded propositions and the investigation of mature agile development teams.

Practical implications

The findings help practitioners to improve the cost-effectiveness ratio of their team’s operations.

Originality/value

The study provides empirical evidence for the emergence of team agility in agile SDTs. Using the lens of CAS, the study suggests the importance of the team’s autonomy.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Uta Schloegel, Sebastian Stegmann, Alexander Maedche and Rolf van Dick

Research on agile software development (ASD) has so far primarily focused on processes and tools. Recently, researchers have started to investigate the social dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on agile software development (ASD) has so far primarily focused on processes and tools. Recently, researchers have started to investigate the social dimensions of ASD. The authors contribute to this and examine the largely invisible psychological factor of age stereotypes as one important social dimension of ASD. Driven by demographic change, employees of different age groups will need to work closely together in ASD in the future. However, age stereotypes can hinder many aspects of communication, cooperation and coordination in these self-managed teams. The purpose of this paper is to identify and differentiate age stereotypes in ASD.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey at the individual level was conducted with 464 employees in two software development companies. The authors developed an age stereotype model for ASD and developed two scales to measure performance expectations (PEs) in ASD.

Findings

Employees in ASD show a bias in general PEs, favoring middle-aged employees over both younger and older employees. The perceived PE of a developer decreases over working life. Furthermore, the data show a complex interplay of age and job role in both the research participants and the group evaluated. Younger developers hold the strongest negative age stereotypes and older developers suffer most from stereotypes.

Practical implications

Management should enact formal or informal measures against stereotypes when an older or younger employee joins a team of members of other age groups, or when a new team is formed. In addition, the authors propose human resources to create permeable career paths.

Originality/value

The study extends the stereotype content model by adding additional age groups and including job role as a moderating variable. It identifies obstacles in daily employee interactions in agile development, and proposes ways of incorporating invisible psychological aspects in ASD-specific theories.

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Carl Simon Heckmann and Alexander Maedche

In highly dynamic industries, business processes require exploitation, i.e. activities that are associated with an increase in productivity through automation…

Abstract

Purpose

In highly dynamic industries, business processes require exploitation, i.e. activities that are associated with an increase in productivity through automation, standardization, integrated architectures, and the usage of existing IT resources. As a complementary capability, exploration is needed, i.e. the ability to flexibly implement new and innovative IT resources (Lee et al., 2015). The purpose of this paper is to use the concept of ambidexterity, which is researched intensively outside the domain of business processes (e.g. Gibson and Birkinshaw, 2004; Tang and Rai, 2014), to address this paradoxical trade-off within business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows a qualitative approach. A multiple case study comprising 11 interviews and additional document analysis in six organizations is conducted in the German energy sector to examine the proposed framework.

Findings

This paper shows the importance of balancing exploitative and explorative business process IT (BPIT) capabilities. The process-theoretical outcome of this study is the BPIT Capability Framework that provides explanation for the interaction between exploitation and exploration.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the understanding of how to build ambidextrous BPIT capabilities by explaining the underlying mechanisms for feedback loops that occur in cases of imbalance. The scope of the conducted study presents a limitation and thus future research is encouraged to further validate the findings of this paper.

Originality/value

By drilling down to the process level, this paper addresses the gaps that limited empirical studies have in business process management research (Recker and Mendling, 2015) and the focus on business processes that is lacking from the literature on organizational IT management (Gregory et al., 2015).

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Frank Hadasch, Alexander Maedche and Shirley Gregor

In organizations, individual user’s compliance with business processes is important from a regulatory and efficiency point of view. The restriction of users’ choices by…

Abstract

Purpose

In organizations, individual user’s compliance with business processes is important from a regulatory and efficiency point of view. The restriction of users’ choices by implementing a restrictive information system is a typical approach in many organizations. However, restrictions and mandated compliance may affect employees’ performance negatively. Especially when users need a certain degree of flexibility in completing their work activity. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of directive explanations (DEs). DEs provide context-dependent feedback to users, but do not force users to comply.

Design/methodology/approach

The experimental study used in this paper aims at investigating how DEs influence users’ process compliance. The authors used a laboratory experiment to test the proposed hypotheses. Every participant underwent four trials for which business process compliance was measured. Two trial blocks were used to cluster the four trials. Diagrammatic DEs were provided in one of the trial blocks, while textual DEs were provided in the other. Trial blocks were counterbalanced.

Findings

The results of the experiment show that DEs influence a user’s compliance, but the effect varies for different types of DEs. The authors believe this study is significant as it empirically examines design characteristics of explanations from knowledge-based systems in the context of business processes.

Research limitations/implications

This study is certainly not without limitations. The sample used for this study was drawn from undergraduate information systems management students. The sample is thus not representative of the general population of organizations’ IT users. However, a student sample adequately represents novice IT users, who are not very familiar with a business process. They are particularly suitable to study how users react to first-time contact with a DE.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are important to designers and implementers of systems that guide users to follow business processes. As the authors have illustrated with a real-world scenario, an ERP system’s explanation can lack details on how a user can resolve a blocked activity. In situations in which users bypass restricted systems, DEs can guide them to comply with a business process. Particularly diagrammatic explanations, which depict actors, activities, and constraints for a business process, have been found to increase the probability that users’ behavior is business process compliant. Less time may be needed to resolve a situation, which can result in very efficient user-system cooperation.

Originality/value

This study makes several important contributions to research on explanations, which are provided by knowledge-based systems. First, the authors conceptualized, designed, and investigated a novel type of explanations, namely, DEs. The results of this study show how dramatic the difference in process compliance performance is when exposed to certain types of DEs (in one group from 57 percent on the initial trial to 82 percent on the fourth trial). This insight is important to derive design guidelines for DE, particularly when multimedia material is used.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet and Judit Bar-Ilan

Ontologies are prone to wide semantic variability due to subjective points of view of their composers. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new approach for maximal…

Abstract

Purpose

Ontologies are prone to wide semantic variability due to subjective points of view of their composers. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new approach for maximal unification of diverse ontologies for controversial domains by their relations.

Design/methodology/approach

Effective matching or unification of multiple ontologies for a specific domain is crucial for the success of many semantic web applications, such as semantic information retrieval and organization, document tagging, summarization and search. To this end, numerous automatic and semi-automatic techniques were proposed in the past decade that attempt to identify similar entities, mostly classes, in diverse ontologies for similar domains. Apparently, matching individual entities cannot result in full integration of ontologies’ semantics without matching their inter-relations with all other-related classes (and instances). However, semantic matching of ontological relations still constitutes a major research challenge. Therefore, in this paper the authors propose a new paradigm for assessment of maximal possible matching and unification of ontological relations. To this end, several unification rules for ontological relations were devised based on ontological reference rules, and lexical and textual entailment. These rules were semi-automatically implemented to extend a given ontology with semantically matching relations from another ontology for a similar domain. Then, the ontologies were unified through these similar pairs of relations. The authors observe that these rules can be also facilitated to reveal the contradictory relations in different ontologies.

Findings

To assess the feasibility of the approach two experiments were conducted with different sets of multiple personal ontologies on controversial domains constructed by trained subjects. The results for about 50 distinct ontology pairs demonstrate a good potential of the methodology for increasing inter-ontology agreement. Furthermore, the authors show that the presented methodology can lead to a complete unification of multiple semantically heterogeneous ontologies.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual study that presents a new approach for semantic unification of ontologies by a devised set of rules along with the initial experimental evidence of its feasibility and effectiveness. However, this methodology has to be fully automatically implemented and tested on a larger dataset in future research.

Practical implications

This result has implication for semantic search, since a richer ontology, comprised of multiple aspects and viewpoints of the domain of knowledge, enhances discoverability and improves search results.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this is the first study to examine and assess the maximal level of semantic relation-based ontology unification.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 66 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Bhavani Sridharan, Hepu Deng and Brian Corbitt

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the critical success factors for sustainable e‐learning in an e‐learning ecosystem framework. Three critical components of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the critical success factors for sustainable e‐learning in an e‐learning ecosystem framework. Three critical components of the e‐learning ecosystem including principles and methods, processes and systems, and substance and content are considered based on a comprehensive review of the relevant literature in e‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic interviews are conducted with experts in e‐learning for identifying the critical success factors to sustainable e‐learning within an e‐learning ecosystem framework. This leads to the development of an e‐learning success model that describes the underlying relationship between and among the identified critical success factors.

Findings

A comprehensive analysis of the interview results shows that there are several barriers to the effective adoption of the proposed e‐learning success model for improving the effectiveness of e‐learning. These barriers include a lack of understanding of the technologies behind various pedagogies, insufficiencies of the popular learning management systems, and the sustainability of the learning objects repositories.

Research limitations/implications

The paper highlights the criticality of synergizing the three components of e‐learning ecosystems namely pedagogies, technologies and management of learning resources for achieving a sustainable e‐learning success.

Practical implications

A better understanding of these barriers would help e‐learning stakeholders develop appropriate strategies and policies for the implementation of the proposed e‐learning success model towards creating a sustainable e‐learning environment.

Originality/value

Specific contributions of this research to the entire e‐learning community are discussed with recommendations for concerted policy measures to eliminate the identified barriers in the process of adopting the developed e‐learning success model.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet and Eden Shalom Erez

Ontologies are defined as consensual formal conceptualisation of shared knowledge. However, the explicit overlap between diverse ontologies is usually very low since they…

Abstract

Purpose

Ontologies are defined as consensual formal conceptualisation of shared knowledge. However, the explicit overlap between diverse ontologies is usually very low since they are typically constructed by different experts. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to suggest to exploit “wisdom of crowds” to assess the maximal potential for inter-ontology agreement on controversial domains.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a scheme where independent ontology users can explicitly express their opinions on the specified set of ontologies. The collected user opinions are further employed as features for machine classification algorithm to distinguish between the consensual ontological relations and the controversial ones. In addition, the authors devised new evaluation methods to measure the reliability and accuracy of the presented scheme.

Findings

The accuracy of the relation classification (90 per cent) and the reliability of user agreement annotations were quite high (over 90 per cent). These results indicate a fair ability of the scheme to learn the maximal set of consensual relations out of the specified set of diverse ontologies.

Research limitations/implications

The data sets and the group of participants in our experiments were of limited size and thus the presented results are promising but cannot be generalised at this stage of research.

Practical implications

A diversity of opinions expressed by different ontologies has to be resolved in order to digitise many domains of knowledge (e.g. cultural heritage, folklore, medicine, economy, religion, history, art). This work presents a methodology to formally represent this diverse knowledge in a rich semantic scheme where there is a need to distinguish between the commonly shared and the controversial relations.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge this is a first proposal to consider crowd-based evaluation and classification of ontological relations to maximise the inter-ontology agreement.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Hani Al-Dmour, Nour Saad, Eatedal Basheer Amin, Rand Al-Dmour and Ahmed Al-Dmour

This paper aims to examine factors influencing the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in Jordan and their bank performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine factors influencing the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in Jordan and their bank performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework was developed in this regard based on a comprehensive literature review and the Technology–Environment–Organization (TOE) model. A quantitative approach was used, and the data was collected from 235 commercial banks’ senior and middle managers (IT, financial and marketers) using both online and paper-based questionnaires.

Findings

The results showed that the extent of the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in Jordan is considered to be moderate (i.e. 60%). The results indicated that 61% of the variation on the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks could be predicated by TOE model. The organizational factors were found the most important predictors. The results also provide empirical evidence that the extent of practices of big data analytics applications has a positive influence on the bank performance. In the final section, research implications and future directions are presented.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to theory by filling a gap in the literature regarding the extent of the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in developing countries, such as Jordan. It empirically examines the impact of the practices of big data analytics applications on bank performance.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Min Zhang, Yunxiao Xue, Jun Yang and Yan Zhang

Members' knowledge contribution behavior has positive significance for maintaining the activity of the knowledge community, as well as for improving knowledge interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Members' knowledge contribution behavior has positive significance for maintaining the activity of the knowledge community, as well as for improving knowledge interaction efficiency and member viscosity. With the development of the mobile Internet, knowledge communities based on social platforms have become more convenient and popular. This study aims to explore what and how factors influence members' knowledge contribution behavior in social knowledge communities from the perspective of social distance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theory of reciprocity and on the theory of self-efficacy, hypotheses and research models are proposed. In the empirical study, WeChat learning group is selected as the research case. The empirical investigation (N = 244) collects research data through questionnaires.

Findings

I-intention and we-intention both have positive influence on members' knowledge contribution behavior. Knowledge self-efficacy positively moderates the influence of we-intention and affects knowledge contribution behavior. In addition, I-intention is positively affected by expected knowledge benefit, expected emotional benefit and expected image benefit, while costs have no effect. We-intention is positively influenced by affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment in relationship strength, as well as affiliation to the contributing climate.

Originality/value

This paper aims to discuss I-intention, we-intention, and their roles in members' knowledge contribution behavior. It is a beneficial development for existing research to combine the characteristics of new style communities with systematical analysis of knowledge contribution behavior. Findings may provide enlightenment to the social knowledge community on diversity development and differentiated marketing strategies.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Sobeida Margarita Giraldo, Luis Joyanes Aguilar, Lillyana María Giraldo and Iván Darío Toro

This paper aims to explore the requirements of organizational knowledge management initiatives using requirements engineering techniques, identifying the optimal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the requirements of organizational knowledge management initiatives using requirements engineering techniques, identifying the optimal techniques configuration and serving as a management tool for knowledge engineers.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is selection attributes. Knowledge management enablers are characterized and mapped with the coverage capabilities of requirements engineering techniques, using the attributes of the elicited object and a box-plot analysis. The information is gathered from 280 references, 32 companies and 16 experts in requirements engineering.

Findings

Requirements of organizational knowledge management initiatives are got optimally by combining interviews, use cases, scenarios, laddering and focus group techniques. The requirements of structure and processes are more complex to identify, while culture requirements are the best covered.

Research limitations/implications

Knowledge management enablers are analyzed according to the current studies and comprehension of engineering techniques.

Practical implications

Knowledge engineers need to consider the coverage capabilities of engineering techniques to design an optimal requirement identification and meet the objectives of organizational knowledge acquisition initiatives. Requirement engineers can improve the requirements identification by a staged selection process.

Social implications

The requirements of knowledge management initiatives that impact the community can be identified and traced to ensure the knowledge objectives. Requirements related to culture and people, like shared values, beliefs, and behaviors, are also considered.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study about formal requirement identification of knowledge management initiatives in the organizational context, providing the optimal configuration. A novel staged process is proposed for requirements engineering techniques selection, analyzing the enablers at component level and identifying the attributes associated with the elicited object.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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