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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Stephanie Pane Haden, Brandon Randolph-Seng, Md. Kamrul Hasan, Alex Williams and Mario Hayek

Although green management has gained legitimacy as a sustainable business practice, little is known about the elements that will lead to the long-term success of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although green management has gained legitimacy as a sustainable business practice, little is known about the elements that will lead to the long-term success of the movement. To identify these elements, this study aims to review the existing literature on social movements and analyzes archival data from a specific social undertaking, the Hispanic Civil Rights movement in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A historiographical approach was used in which systematic combining used abductive logic to developed a provisional framework based on the interpretation of secondary sources of data concerning the Hispanic Civil Rights movement. Subsequently, an ethnomethodologically informed interpretation of primary data based on the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) archives refined the provisional framework.

Findings

The authors identified common elements that are critical to the success of social movements, as supported by both secondary data on the Hispanic Civil Rights movement and primary data based on the LULAC archives. These elements consist of: ideology, identity, mobilization, goals, leadership and integration. Using these results, a pseudo-gap analysis approach was completed by systematically comparing the interpretive data with current knowledge of the green management movement to identify the missing gaps and to offer guidance for further development of green management as a contemporary movement.

Social implications

Applying the lessons learned from social movements will help the development and prosperity of the green movement in current business organizations. Such applications are important, given that local and global environmental crises can have profound implications on ecosystems, economics and social systems.

Originality/value

Social movements are an important means by which societal concerns such as injustices are addressed. By identifying the important elements needed for the green management movement to be successful in the long term, managers will know where to put their efforts. Such actions may help environmental awareness in business organizations to become more than a fad or marketing tool.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Md. Kamrul Hasan, Mario Joseph Hayek, Wallace A. Williams, Jr, Stephanie Pane-Haden and Maria Paula Martinez Gelvez

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this paper seeks to formalize a definition of activist entrepreneurship and differentiate it from social entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this paper seeks to formalize a definition of activist entrepreneurship and differentiate it from social entrepreneurship. Second, this paper proposes a model that explains how the storytelling process, in the form of the message and means of communication, influences the activist identity process and consequently the legitimacy of the activist entrepreneur.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains the historical method and offers an overview of the unique case of Madam C.J. Walker and analyzes how she gained legitimacy as an activist entrepreneur by conveying psychological capital (Psycap) concepts in her message and political skill in the means of her communication. The paper also analyzed books being written on her and also letters that were exchanged between herself and her lawyer F.B. Ransom.

Findings

The authors have found out that Madam Walker used Psycap elements such as self-efficacy, hope, resiliency and optimism as message and elements of political skill such as social astuteness, interpersonal skill, networking ability and apparent sincerity as means to communicate the message toward her followers and built a legitimate social identity where she had won the trust of them.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation of this paper is that it is theoretical in nature and uses only one case study to support the theoretical model. However, when analyzing complex relationships, historical cases offer a wealth of insight to solve the problem at hand.

Originality/value

By using the elements of the model discussed in the research paper properly, people could create a legitimate identity for themselves where any message they give to their employees, colleagues and sub-ordinates would be viewed as a selfless one and that would increase the chances of their messages or orders being accepted and obeyed by the followers.

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Saurabh Srivastava, Swati Panda and Wallace A. Williams

This paper aims to investigate the process of innovation in firms founded by user-entrepreneurs. It also empirically investigates the role of customer involvement and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the process of innovation in firms founded by user-entrepreneurs. It also empirically investigates the role of customer involvement and user-entrepreneurs’ learning goal orientation in the innovation process.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design is used to collect data from entrepreneurs managing small businesses. A total of 255 entrepreneurs responded to the survey questionnaire. The partial least square structural equation model was used to test the measurement and structural model.

Findings

Results suggest a positive association of user-entrepreneurship with innovation and customer involvement. Results also confirmed that customer involvement mediates the relationship between user-entrepreneurship and innovation. In addition, results suggest that the higher learning orientation (LO) of user-entrepreneurs plays a vital role in innovation by strengthening the relationship between user-entrepreneurship and customer involvement.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on small entrepreneurial firms with less than equal to or less than 250 employees. The results may not be generalizable to larger user-entrepreneurial firms. Also, this study is based on American entrepreneurs. Therefore, the results may not be generalizable to other countries.

Practical implications

Evidence for the role of customer involvement and LO in the innovation process can be used by entrepreneurs and small business owners in hiring and training decisions. Also, the findings suggest the important role played by customers in the innovation process. Firms can use this insight to involve their customers in the product development process to secure better innovation outcomes.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the innovation and entrepreneurship literature by emphasizing the critical role of customer networks in user-entrepreneurs’ innovation performance. It offers a process model that offers empirical evidence supporting the positive role of customer involvement in new ventures. It highlights the role of the LO of user-entrepreneurs in the customer engagement process.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

JOHN R. WILLIAMS and ALEX P. PENTLAND

This paper discusses advances in interactive discrete element simulation for use in computer‐aided concurrent design. We highlight the computational problems of creating a…

Abstract

This paper discusses advances in interactive discrete element simulation for use in computer‐aided concurrent design. We highlight the computational problems of creating a ‘virtual world’ populated by objects which behave much as real world objects and propose a system based on a new class of volumetric models, called superquadrics. These functions have significant advantages for calculating multibody interactions, and by coupling volumetric representation to a modal decomposition method for the physical dynamics we have been able to gain up to two orders of magnitude in efficiency. The modal method allows us to trade off high order modes for improved stability, time step magnitude, temporal aliasing and speed of response, and so provide almost real time feedback to the designer. We believe that virtual manufacturing systems will be especially useful in conceptual design, in design for manufacture and in the new thrust in concurrent design.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Corbynism: A Critical Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-372-0

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Alex Williams

This article aims to explore what are likely to be key factors in a successful journey to employment for someone who has experienced long‐term mental distress.

568

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore what are likely to be key factors in a successful journey to employment for someone who has experienced long‐term mental distress.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is a personal account of entering and sustaining employment by someone who has experienced long‐term mental distress and use of secondary mental health services. The writer reflects on a hard fought journey to start paid work in the hope that readers may understand this process for themselves and others in similar positions.

Findings

Key factors in the transition to employment are hard work, workplace support, specialist vocational advice, individual determination and willing employers. Support needs to be flexible, personalised, ongoing and sometimes intensive. Time is measured in years rather than months.

Practical implications

The integration of specialist vocational advice within mental health teams may be an effective approach.

Research implications

Further research into the practical and psychological barriers to employment for mental health service users, which may extend far beyond the more commonly studied stigma and discrimination, would enhance existing knowledge of vocational rehabilitation.

Originality/value

Published testimonies from service users and survivors on their experiences of entering employment for the first time are few in number. More such testimonies would help understanding of this potentially complex process.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Alex Williams

The paper is a follow-up to a personal account published in this journal 12 months ago. The purpose of this paper is to highlight job retention through support measures…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper is a follow-up to a personal account published in this journal 12 months ago. The purpose of this paper is to highlight job retention through support measures during a period of crisis, contrasted with factors which undermine a quicker return to good mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a personal account of difficulties experienced within and outside the workplace for someone who has been through long-term mental distress and is in her first, proper, paid job. The author reflects on becoming unwell while in full-time work with fears of dismissal by the employer as well as rejection by mental health services. Due to a supportive employer the author is still employed but is more aware of distress triggers.

Findings

Helpful approaches which make job sustainment possible include the use of independent occupational health services, supported employment advice, phased returns, income maximisation through Disability Living Allowance and employer flexibility. The factors which inhibited this were miscommunications with statutory services and a widespread inability to recognise and understand distress expressed through self-harm.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed into the practical responses from employers once an employee who has ongoing mental health issues discloses deterioration in symptoms. The context of a person's home life and treatment available means that work may not be the main stress.

Originality/value

Published testimonies from service users and survivors on successes in sustaining employment remain few in number.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Xiaohuan Zhang, Alex Williams and Yiannis E. Polychronakis

This paper sets out to identify key success criteria for e‐business and consider emergent models which integrate the most value‐adding characteristics in response to the…

3544

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to identify key success criteria for e‐business and consider emergent models which integrate the most value‐adding characteristics in response to the requirements of both consumers and business organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

In assessing differing models of B2C/C2C, the paper uses an adapted evaluation framework which brings together key factors identified from the literature. A Likert scale exercise undertaken enables the authors to subsequently rank models.

Findings

Analysis of the results from the differing models identifies 14 primary success factors from which the paper develops a modified ontology of e‐business. This is attributed to the evolving role of internet communities and social networking; the impact of “mobbing” and demand aggregation on rate of growth; and the effects of the “long tail” in differentiating markets into high‐diversity short‐run products.

Research limitations/implications

It is recognised that the scoring exercise is based on a limited range of exemplars for each e‐model, which are ranked by a relatively small panel of experts. The expertise of those participating may also have constrained the validity of the results. However, there is significant consistency between the responses from each, indicating that the results are not unrealistic.

Originality/value

The paper discusses e‐business from a differing view to existing literature, which considers emergent trends such as the effects of the “long tail” and “mobbing” in isolation, rather than focusing on a discussion of value chain factors per se. The authors develop a modified ontology of e‐business based on a practical analysis of e‐business exemplars rather than comparative studies based solely on literature reviews.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Ana Cecilia Dinerstein and Frederick Harry Pitts

Abstract

Details

A World Beyond Work?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-143-8

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