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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Rachael Dixey, Pinki Sahota, Serbjit Atwal and Alex Turner

Presents results of focus group discussions held with 300 nine‐to‐11‐year old UK children. Questions were asked about whether it matters if someone is fat or thin; whether…

Abstract

Presents results of focus group discussions held with 300 nine‐to‐11‐year old UK children. Questions were asked about whether it matters if someone is fat or thin; whether a fat child should take any action; what problems they might have; and the relationship between fatness, thinness and health. Considerable complexity emerged; children divided fat children into those for whom it was natural and those for whom it was self‐inflicted. They showed a great deal of sympathy for “naturally” fat children. However, they also felt that fat children would be bullied. Girls seemed less able than boys to resist the pressures to be thin, but also showed considerable ability to distance themselves from media images of thin women. Although children had learned the orthodoxy surrounding health, fat and overweight, they did not believe that “thin is good, fat is bad” and did not tend to link weight control with exercise.

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Health Education, vol. 101 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Alex Turner

This article describes the practical example and experience ofsetting up from scratch an organisation called Support Line for KentSocial Services Department. It covers…

Abstract

This article describes the practical example and experience of setting up from scratch an organisation called Support Line for Kent Social Services Department. It covers briefly the type of service, the marketing of it and organisational context and evaluation.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

John A. Sloboda, Jeffrey S. Hopkins, Alex Turner, Don Rogers and John McLeod

Describes the way in which one UK organization has responded to theproblem of stress at work through the establishment of an in‐housecounselling service available without…

Abstract

Describes the way in which one UK organization has responded to the problem of stress at work through the establishment of an in‐house counselling service available without charge to all employees. Describes the structure and mode of operation of the service, including the monitoring and evaluation process. Presents broad outcomes of the monitoring and evaluation and draws out some implications for good practice.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

John Pitts

The purpose of this paper is to consider youth gangs and county lines with reference to the current drive for a public health response to these issues.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider youth gangs and county lines with reference to the current drive for a public health response to these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint paper traces the development of gang and serious youth violence responses in England, exploring the shift from a punitive to safeguarding response to young people affected by these issues.

Findings

Drawing on the learning from both Scotland and the USA, this paper considers the relevance of a public health model to responding to youth gangs and county lines, highlighting the key facets of such an approach.

Originality/value

This paper provides a historical context to the issues surrounding previous responses to youth gangs and goes on to consider the practicalities and relevance of a public health model response.

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart

Entrepreneurs may wish to be selective about which relatives to include or exclude in their businesses. For example, their child might be inept but their niece might be…

Abstract

Entrepreneurs may wish to be selective about which relatives to include or exclude in their businesses. For example, their child might be inept but their niece might be outstanding. What aspects of kinship systems affect their ability to make these sorts of choices? What enables them to bend their ties of kinship and marriage to the interests of their business? Most broadly, what dimensions of kinship lend themselves to tactical or instrumental actions? This question is sweeping just as my meaning of “entrepreneurs” is very broad: those who take actions with the goal of growing their capital (Stewart, 1991). This capital may take the form of newly started ventures, dynastic firms, or even in precapitalist systems other social forms, for example, rural estates farmed by followers.

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Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2021

Clare Holdsworth

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The Social Life of Busyness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-699-2

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Alex J. Bowers and Andrew E. Krumm

Currently, in the education data use literature, there is a lack of research and examples that consider the early steps of filtering, organizing and visualizing data to…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, in the education data use literature, there is a lack of research and examples that consider the early steps of filtering, organizing and visualizing data to inform decision-making. The purpose of this study is to describe how school leaders and researchers visualized and jointly made sense of data from a common learning management system (LMS) used by students across multiple schools and grades in a charter management organization operating in the USA. To make sense of LMS data, researchers and practitioners formed a partnership to organize complex data sets, create data visualizations and engage in joint sensemaking around data visualizations to begin to launch continuous improvement cycles.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed LMS data for n = 476 students in Algebra I using hierarchical cluster analysis heatmaps. The authors also engaged in a qualitative case study that examined the ways in which school leaders made sense of the data visualization to inform improvement efforts.

Findings

The outcome of this study is a framework for informing evidence-based improvement cycles using large, complex data sets. Central to moving through the various steps in the proposed framework are collaborations between researchers and practitioners who each bring expertise that is necessary for organizing, filtering and visualizing data from digital learning environments and administrative data systems.

Originality/value

The authors propose an integrated cycle of data use in schools that builds on collaborations between researchers and school leaders to inform evidence-based improvement cycles.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Anthea Tinker, Claudine Mccreadie and Alan Turner‐Smith

The growing proportion of older people in the United Kingdom requires policies that are cost‐effective and responsive to their needs. Both these factors have led to…

Abstract

The growing proportion of older people in the United Kingdom requires policies that are cost‐effective and responsive to their needs. Both these factors have led to growing emphasis on policies which enable older people to remain in homes of their own. Older people are becoming more vociferous in expressing their views and are being encouraged to do this. This article reports on three pieces of research funded by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) which have attempted to draw on the views of older people about assistive technology and its role in staying at home policies.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Ronald Scott Wolf and Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

Reputational crisis negatively affects brands and companies. This chapter, based on a single case study, aims to explore how prejudicial corporate statements directed…

Abstract

Purpose

Reputational crisis negatively affects brands and companies. This chapter, based on a single case study, aims to explore how prejudicial corporate statements directed toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals have affected the Italian multinational Barilla S.p.A., as well as how the company responded both internally and to the market in order to attempt to overcome the highly damaging consequences.

Design/Methodology

This chapter uses a single case-study methodology, which constitutes “a research strategy that focuses on understanding the dynamics present within single settings to create theoretical constructs, propositions and/or midrange theory from empirical evidence” (Eisenhardt, 1989, p. 534). The case-study design was chosen as it has been demonstrated to provide a methodological tool for both theory generation and theory testing (Gibbert et al., 2008).

Findings

Conclusions from the chapter indicate that negative, incendiary, and oftentimes comments citing either religious or stereotypical-based ideology negatively impact both the consumers and its associated publics in terms of product branding or reputation image.

Research Limitations

The study’s limitations, which rely primarily on a single case study and secondary research data, may motivate further investigative avenues, particularly as similarly referenced events continue to unfold almost daily, such as the study’s referenced incident with Philippine boxer Manny Pacquiao, as well as action taken by social media giants (Apple and Facebook) against the controversial media figure Alex Jones.

Practical and Social Implications

This chapter also looks at family succession roadblocks and navigating social media gaffes. These contemporary issues highlight challenges, strategies, sales and market share dynamics for the company, and suggestions for navigating the road ahead. The research concludes with possible linkages and insights for both ongoing management issues and potential areas for future research. Other findings indicate that rapid responses, particularly those citing concrete corporate policy changes or tangible actions, help to reverse and mitigate reputational damage, and contemporary approaches utilizing social media appear to buttress these efforts.

Originality/Value

This case study of Barilla as well as other firms mentioned, such as Chick-fil-A and Nike (which have experienced parallel situational crises), indicates that in only the last five years of contemporary international business practice, MNEs are continually and at times unexpectedly challenged by the lack of sensitivity demonstrated by their owners and spokespeople who utter comments which may be seen by the public as potentially harmful to the LGBT community. This study hopes to illuminate this challenge while offering tangible solutions to turning around future, similar situational crises.

Details

Diversity within Diversity Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-172-9

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