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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart, G.T. Lumpkin and Jerome A. Katz

The peer-reviewed chapters in Volume 12 emphasize the role of family systems in shaping entrepreneurial outcomes. Interestingly, spousal influence is a major topic in…

Abstract

The peer-reviewed chapters in Volume 12 emphasize the role of family systems in shaping entrepreneurial outcomes. Interestingly, spousal influence is a major topic in three of the chapters. Another important theme is family business identity and how a range of different influences – from within-family perceptions to broad institutional pressures – affect family business image and organizational performance. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods are employed to address the role of entrepreneurship in family businesses.

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Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart

Entrepreneurs may wish to be selective about which relatives to include or exclude in their businesses. For example, their child might be inept but their niece might be…

Abstract

Entrepreneurs may wish to be selective about which relatives to include or exclude in their businesses. For example, their child might be inept but their niece might be outstanding. What aspects of kinship systems affect their ability to make these sorts of choices? What enables them to bend their ties of kinship and marriage to the interests of their business? Most broadly, what dimensions of kinship lend themselves to tactical or instrumental actions? This question is sweeping just as my meaning of “entrepreneurs” is very broad: those who take actions with the goal of growing their capital (Stewart, 1991). This capital may take the form of newly started ventures, dynastic firms, or even in precapitalist systems other social forms, for example, rural estates farmed by followers.

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Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart and Michael A. Hitt

Are the social domains of kinship and business on balance complementary or contradictory? Do ventures that invest heavily in both – conventionally referred to as “family…

Abstract

Are the social domains of kinship and business on balance complementary or contradictory? Do ventures that invest heavily in both – conventionally referred to as “family firms” – bear a net gain or net loss? We are scarcely the first to raise these questions. How then will we try to contribute to an answer? We try this in five ways, all of them based on previous literature. First, we develop the dichotomy of kinship and business by taking seriously the metaphor of yin and yang, merging it with the anthropological constructs of structural domains such as “domestic” and “public.” This metaphor proves to shed light on the relevant literature. Second, we provide a qualitative survey of the costs and benefits of kinship in business. Third, we summarize the empirical work that addresses the performance outcomes from family involvement. Fourth, we consider the practitioner implications of these studies. Finally, we ask if scholars are as yet in a position to answer these questions.

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Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart

Less polemical authors have published useful overviews of scholarship and institutional development in family business (Chrisman, Kellermanns, Chan, & Liano, 2010; Heck

Abstract

Less polemical authors have published useful overviews of scholarship and institutional development in family business (Chrisman, Kellermanns, Chan, & Liano, 2010; Heck, Hoy, Poutziouris, & Steier, 2008; Schulze & Gedajlovic, 2010; Sharma, 2004). I take this as license for hyperbole. In such a vein, I am skeptical eight times over: that the field can be objective, that it can be defined, that “family business” is the right label, that it will find useful theories, that kinship exists, that if it does exist (all right, I do believe it does) we really observe it in action, that the field can progress without regressing, that it can be relevant, and that it can find its niche in universities. “Skeptical” has a nice ring to it. I confess, though, that my concerns are worries more than a lack of willingness to believe. After all, I hope that the papers in this volume will goad us into avoiding pitfalls as the field develops.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

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Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Frank Hoy

Although the Entrepreneurship Division of the Academy of Management includes family businesses within its domain statement, it is important to recognize that these are two…

Abstract

Although the Entrepreneurship Division of the Academy of Management includes family businesses within its domain statement, it is important to recognize that these are two distinct domains, although enjoying some overlap (cf. Stewart, 2008, for comparisons of family business with entrepreneurship and other domains). Both are comprehensive domains. They encompass the various functions of business administration: accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and so forth. And both extend beyond business administration departments. Entrepreneurship relates to the creation of intellectual property in science and engineering; it draws from sociology, psychology, and other liberal arts disciplines; and it extends into education programs as more kindergarten through high school programs incorporate exposure to free enterprise systems and venturing into their curricula.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Alex Stewart and John Cotton

Dozens of peer‐reviewed, English language journals are currently published in our field. How ought we to evaluate them? This paper seeks to answer this question.

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Abstract

Purpose

Dozens of peer‐reviewed, English language journals are currently published in our field. How ought we to evaluate them? This paper seeks to answer this question.

Design/methodology approach

The paper utilizes both relevant literature and data on entrepreneurship journals. The literature derives from both information science and other research areas that reflect on their journals. The data derives from six citation measures from Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science.

Findings

The paper finds that there are 59 currently published English language, peer reviewed journals in entrepreneurship. Contestable judgments based on their impact measures suggest that one of these 59 could be considered as “A+”, four as “A”, five as “AB”, eight as “B”, four as “BC”, 23 as “C”, thirteen as “barely detectable”, and one as “insufficient data but promising”.

Research limitations/implications

Journal rankings affect the resources and prestige accorded to business schools, disciplines and subdisciplines, and individual scholars. However, the need to fit evaluations to school strategy implies that no rating system, ours included, is definitive. Multiple measures are needed, letter grades are misleading, and journal rankings should match the institution's strategy and priorities in stakeholder service. A wider purpose of this study is to alert readers to the range of current methodologies and the limits of conventional rankings.

Originality/value

The conclusions presented in this paper appear innocuous, but standard practice is to use restrictive measures, to employ letter grades, and to prioritize only one stakeholder: scholars. These practices are poorly suited to the entrepreneurship field.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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