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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 August 2022

Paul Soper, Alex G. Stewart, Rajan Nathan, Sharleen Nall-Evans, Rachel Mills, Felix Michelet and Sujeet Jaydeokar

This study aims to evaluate the quality of transition from child and adolescent services to adult intellectual disability services, using the relevant National Institute…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the quality of transition from child and adolescent services to adult intellectual disability services, using the relevant National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) standard (QS140). In addition, this study also identifies any differences in transition quality between those young people with intellectual disability with and without autism.

Design/methodology/approach

Using routinely collected clinical data, this study identifies demographic and clinical characteristics of, and contextual complexities experienced by, young people in transition between 2017 and 2020. Compliance with the quality standard was assessed by applying dedicated search terms to the records.

Findings

The study highlighted poor recording of data with only 22% of 306 eligible cases having sufficient data recorded to determine compliance with the NICE quality standard. Available data indicated poor compliance with the standard. Child and adolescent mental health services, generally, did not record mental health co-morbidities. Compliance with three out of the five quality statements was higher for autistic young people, but this only reached statistical significance for one of those statements (i.e. having a named worker, p = 0.02).

Research limitations/implications

Missing data included basic clinical characteristics such as the level of intellectual disability and the presence of autism. This required adult services to duplicate assessment procedures that potentially delayed clinical outcomes. This study highlights that poor compliance may reflect inaccurate recording that needs addressing through training and introduction of shared protocols.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the transition process between children’s and adults’ intellectual disability health services using NICE quality standard 140.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart, G.T. Lumpkin and Jerome A. Katz

The peer-reviewed chapters in Volume 12 emphasize the role of family systems in shaping entrepreneurial outcomes. Interestingly, spousal influence is a major topic in…

Abstract

The peer-reviewed chapters in Volume 12 emphasize the role of family systems in shaping entrepreneurial outcomes. Interestingly, spousal influence is a major topic in three of the chapters. Another important theme is family business identity and how a range of different influences – from within-family perceptions to broad institutional pressures – affect family business image and organizational performance. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods are employed to address the role of entrepreneurship in family businesses.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart

Entrepreneurs may wish to be selective about which relatives to include or exclude in their businesses. For example, their child might be inept but their niece might be…

Abstract

Entrepreneurs may wish to be selective about which relatives to include or exclude in their businesses. For example, their child might be inept but their niece might be outstanding. What aspects of kinship systems affect their ability to make these sorts of choices? What enables them to bend their ties of kinship and marriage to the interests of their business? Most broadly, what dimensions of kinship lend themselves to tactical or instrumental actions? This question is sweeping just as my meaning of “entrepreneurs” is very broad: those who take actions with the goal of growing their capital (Stewart, 1991). This capital may take the form of newly started ventures, dynastic firms, or even in precapitalist systems other social forms, for example, rural estates farmed by followers.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart and Michael A. Hitt

Are the social domains of kinship and business on balance complementary or contradictory? Do ventures that invest heavily in both – conventionally referred to as “family…

Abstract

Are the social domains of kinship and business on balance complementary or contradictory? Do ventures that invest heavily in both – conventionally referred to as “family firms” – bear a net gain or net loss? We are scarcely the first to raise these questions. How then will we try to contribute to an answer? We try this in five ways, all of them based on previous literature. First, we develop the dichotomy of kinship and business by taking seriously the metaphor of yin and yang, merging it with the anthropological constructs of structural domains such as “domestic” and “public.” This metaphor proves to shed light on the relevant literature. Second, we provide a qualitative survey of the costs and benefits of kinship in business. Third, we summarize the empirical work that addresses the performance outcomes from family involvement. Fourth, we consider the practitioner implications of these studies. Finally, we ask if scholars are as yet in a position to answer these questions.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Alex Stewart

Less polemical authors have published useful overviews of scholarship and institutional development in family business (Chrisman, Kellermanns, Chan, & Liano, 2010; Heck

Abstract

Less polemical authors have published useful overviews of scholarship and institutional development in family business (Chrisman, Kellermanns, Chan, & Liano, 2010; Heck, Hoy, Poutziouris, & Steier, 2008; Schulze & Gedajlovic, 2010; Sharma, 2004). I take this as license for hyperbole. In such a vein, I am skeptical eight times over: that the field can be objective, that it can be defined, that “family business” is the right label, that it will find useful theories, that kinship exists, that if it does exist (all right, I do believe it does) we really observe it in action, that the field can progress without regressing, that it can be relevant, and that it can find its niche in universities. “Skeptical” has a nice ring to it. I confess, though, that my concerns are worries more than a lack of willingness to believe. After all, I hope that the papers in this volume will goad us into avoiding pitfalls as the field develops.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Frank Hoy

Although the Entrepreneurship Division of the Academy of Management includes family businesses within its domain statement, it is important to recognize that these are two…

Abstract

Although the Entrepreneurship Division of the Academy of Management includes family businesses within its domain statement, it is important to recognize that these are two distinct domains, although enjoying some overlap (cf. Stewart, 2008, for comparisons of family business with entrepreneurship and other domains). Both are comprehensive domains. They encompass the various functions of business administration: accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and so forth. And both extend beyond business administration departments. Entrepreneurship relates to the creation of intellectual property in science and engineering; it draws from sociology, psychology, and other liberal arts disciplines; and it extends into education programs as more kindergarten through high school programs incorporate exposure to free enterprise systems and venturing into their curricula.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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