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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Will Kaberuka, Alex Mugarura, Javan Tindyebwa and Debra S. Bishop

The purpose of this paper is to establish socio-economic factors and maternal practices that determine child mortality in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish socio-economic factors and maternal practices that determine child mortality in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the role of sex, birth weight, birth order and duration of breastfeeding of a child; age, marital status and education of the mother; and household wealth in determining child mortality. The study employs a logistic regression model to establish which of the factors significantly impacts child mortality in Uganda.

Findings

The study established that education level, age and marital status of the mother as well as household wealth significantly impact child mortality. Also important are the sex, birth weight, birth order and breastfeeding duration.

Research limitations/implications

Policies aimed at promoting breastfeeding and education of female children can make a significant contribution to the reduction of child mortality in Uganda.

Practical implications

Health care intervention programs should focus on single, poor and uneducated mothers as their children are at great risk due to poor and inadequate health care utilization.

Originality/value

This paper could be the first effort in examining child mortality status in Uganda using a logistic regression model.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Eugene E. Mniwasa

This paper aims to examine the authorities tasked to fight against money laundering in Tanzania and appraise the efficacy of the country’s anti-money institutional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the authorities tasked to fight against money laundering in Tanzania and appraise the efficacy of the country’s anti-money institutional framework to tackle the problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a qualitative research and data generated from the analysis of documentary materials. It surveys the anti-money laundering (AML) law in Tanzania to describe the legal and institutional frameworks for tackling money laundering. It explores law-related and non-law aspects to interrogate and appraise the efficacy of Tanzania’s AML law and authorities. The qualitative data were generated using the thematic content analysis technique.

Findings

The law in Tanzania establishes authorities and vests them with powers to combat money laundering. The authorities, which are part of Tanzania’s AML institutional framework, have been instrumental in combating money laundering. Nevertheless, several law-related and non-law factors emasculate the efficacy of the AML law and authorities in Tanzania. Some political and economic factors wear off the effectiveness of the country’s AML institutional framework. The transnational nature and complexity of money laundering overwhelm the capacity of the AML authorities in Tanzania.

Practical implications

The paper provides useful insights on money laundering and the legal regime to counteract the scourge in Tanzania which sets up the country’s AML institutional framework. It raises some issues for researchers, policymakers and law enforcers who can re-examine the problem and revisit the law and re-evaluate authorities and propose measures that will enable the government to reinforce the country’s AML regime. The paper makes a case for the government to implement the reforms of the country’s AML policy, legal and institutional frameworks.

Originality/value

The paper investigates issues relating to money laundering and its control in Tanzania beyond the legal perspective to uncover limitations and challenges that emasculate the efficacy of the AML authorities in the Tanzanian context. The issues examined in this paper are not unique to Tanzania and, hence, have relevance to other jurisdictions in sub-Saharan Africa.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Eugene E. Mniwasa

This paper aims to explore the evolution of the law for combating economic crimes including money laundering in Tanzania and explore the current developments in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the evolution of the law for combating economic crimes including money laundering in Tanzania and explore the current developments in the anti-money laundering (AML) law and the ongoing fight against these crimes in Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

A desk-based review of documents on money laundering and its control in Tanzania was conducted. The paper presents qualitative data from the documentary sources. It applies the doctrinal legal research approach to examine, analyze and describe the AML law applicable in Tanzania. The paper uses the “law-in-context” research approach to explore some non-law aspects of money laundering in Tanzania and interrogate how the law addresses non-law dimensions of money laundering. Policy documents and media reports were analyzed. The thematic data analysis technique was applied, which involved identifying, describing and reporting issues according to the themes emerging from the data.

Findings

The AML law in Tanzania emerged from the law that was originally enacted to curb economic crimes. The law has evolved for some decades. Its evolution has been driven by domestic factors and foreign drivers which are political, economic and social in nature. The role of the AML law has been changing. Initially, the law was a tool for curbing economic crimes. Recently, the law has acquired a new role, namely, to facilitate the recovery of illicit funds and non-financial assets from offenders and enable the authorities in Tanzania to use those economic resources for developmental purposes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper underscores the need for the Government of Tanzania to re-consider the broader implications involved in its current efforts to tackle economic crimes and money laundering. The balance between the implementation of the measures to combat money laundering and economic crimes in Tanzania and the importance of protecting rights of persons indicted with those offences should be struck. The AML law should be applied in such a way not to infringe the rights of the accused persons and not to throttle economic activities including the flow of legitimate foreign investments into Tanzania.

Originality/value

This paper generates insightful information to policymakers, law enforcers, regulators and other stakeholders who undertake activities to tackle money laundering and its control in Tanzania and researchers who study these issues for purposes of providing understanding of the problem and facilitating policy and legal reforms. The paper raises issues that can be explored further in future and contribute to the discourse on money laundering and its control in Tanzania.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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