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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1975

Alex Allardyce, Graham Cornish, Jim Davey and Maurice B Line

The BLLD is able to satisfy a growing percentage of requests for material in the humanities. Its retrospective collections and current purchasing policy, which are…

Abstract

The BLLD is able to satisfy a growing percentage of requests for material in the humanities. Its retrospective collections and current purchasing policy, which are described in some detail, enable it to supply half of the humanities monographs requested and two thirds of the serials from stock, with increasingly high success rates for more recent material. A further 30% of monograph requests and 15% of serial requests are satisfied from back‐up libraries (including the legal deposit libraries) and other sources.

Details

BLL Review, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6503

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Fola Esan, Melanie Pittaway, Beatrice Nyamande and Alex Graham

This paper aims to describe the experience of a secure learning disability service in participating in the national Shared Pathway pilot project in secure services.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the experience of a secure learning disability service in participating in the national Shared Pathway pilot project in secure services.

Design/methodology/approach

Some background drivers to the project are explored as well as the experience of service users and staff who were involved in the pilot project. Recommendations on service‐wide implementation of the Shared Pathway are made.

Findings

The Shared Pathway will lead to considerable changes in practice. This will also have resource implications.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the Shared Pathway may be useful in ensuring evidence based outcomes are routinely used by clinicians in secure services in collaboration with patients. It may also clarify to patients what their role is in engaging in treatment that helps them in moving through secure services.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Lucinda Cheshire, Verity Chester, Alex Graham, Jackie Grace and Regi T Alexander

There is little published literature about the number of home visits provided to patients within forensic intellectual disability units, and there is no published data on…

Abstract

Purpose

There is little published literature about the number of home visits provided to patients within forensic intellectual disability units, and there is no published data on variables that affect home visits. There is a need for a baseline audit that can formulate standards for future practice. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the home visit programme within a forensic intellectual disability service, and a baseline audit of the programme. The audit measured the number of home visits, any factors that adversely affect home visits, and the extent of family contact. The authors propose audit standards for evaluation of good practice in this area.

Findings

The audit involved 63 patients over a one-year period. In total, 81 per cent of patients had some form of family contact and 54 per cent of patients at least one home visit. However, 19 per cent of patients had no contact with their family due to a variety of reasons. There were no significant differences in the number of home visits between men and women, patients on civil vs criminal sections or those treated “within area” or “out of area”. Patients in rehabilitation wards had significantly more visits than those in low or medium secure.

Originality/value

Conventional wisdom is that reduced family contact is the direct result of patients being placed “out of area”. The results of this audit suggest that, at least in this group, the reasons may be much more nuanced and that the current definition of “out of area” has to be improved to incorporate the actual distance between the patient’s current family home and the service. Audit standards have been proposed to monitor family contact and home visits. Future work should focus on the relationship between family contact and treatment outcomes.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Adrian Wheeler

Abstract

Details

Crisis Communications Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-615-6

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

80

Abstract

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

47

Abstract

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

William K. Beatty

The term “medical” will be interpreted broadly to include both basic and clinical sciences, related health fields, and some “medical” elements of biology and chemistry. A…

Abstract

The term “medical” will be interpreted broadly to include both basic and clinical sciences, related health fields, and some “medical” elements of biology and chemistry. A reference book is here defined as any book that is likely to be consulted for factual information more frequently than it will be picked up and read through in sequential order. Medical reference books have a place in public, school, college, and other non‐medical libraries as well as in the wide variety of medical libraries. All of these libraries will be considered in this column. A basic starting collection of medical material for a public library is outlined and described in an article by William and Virginia Beatty that appeared in the May, 1974, issue of American Libraries.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2017

Juho Honkasilta

This chapter is based on compulsory school experiences of students diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and their parents in the educational…

Abstract

This chapter is based on compulsory school experiences of students diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and their parents in the educational context of Finland. Located in the theoretical framework of Disability Studies, the chapter aims to contribute to theory of inclusive education by initiating a new dialogue on conceptual foundations of inclusive schooling. In this regard, the chapter first deconstructs the concept of educational need that stems from the field of traditional special education as contradictory to the original ideals of inclusive education. It then moves on to reconstruct the concept of educational need in accordance with the foundational values of inclusion, that is celebration of human diversity and resistance to dichotomies of ab-/normality and dis-/ability and proposes an approach for future implementation of inclusive education.

Details

Working with Families for Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-260-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2016

Hermine L Graham, Emma Jean Griffith, Alex Copello and Max Birchwood

To provide a summary of the principles, theories and basic components of a recently developed brief integrated motivational intervention (BIMI) for working with…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a summary of the principles, theories and basic components of a recently developed brief integrated motivational intervention (BIMI) for working with individuals experience co-ccurring severe mental health and substance use problems in inpatient settings, including the outcomes of a feasiblity randomised controlled trial (RCT). There are greater financial costs and a negative impact on functioning associated with psychiatric admissions for people who experience co-occurring severe mental heath and substance misuse problems. In addition, their engagement in treatment is often problematic.

Design/methodology/approach

The BIMI described was evaluated via a feasibility RCT that assessed whether the opportunity to discuss use of substances whilst on an inpatient ward represented an opportunity to engage inpatients in thinking about their use and the impact it has on their mental health.

Findings

The BIMI is delivered in short burst sessions of 15-30 minutes over a two-week period adopting a simple 3-step approach that can be delivered by routine ward staff. It incorporates an assessment of substance use, mental health and motivation followed by personalised feedback, a focus on increasing awareness of the impact on mental health and development of goals and a change plan. The intervention has been shown to lead to higher levels of engagement in clients exploration of substance use and the impact on mental health. Findings suggest both staff and inpatients found the intervention feasible and acceptable.

Originality/value

Routine ward staff were trained to deliver a brief intervention to inpatients during an acute hospital admission.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Alex W. Clarke

The corporate dividend decision has been of interest to researchers in finance for many years. Early theoretical and empirical work such as Graham and Dodd [1951], Lintner…

Abstract

The corporate dividend decision has been of interest to researchers in finance for many years. Early theoretical and empirical work such as Graham and Dodd [1951], Lintner [1956], Miller and Modigliani [1961] and in part Ball and Brown [1968] concentrated upon the signalling properties of dividend announcements. As a result of this early work, a nexus between dividends and current or foreseeable corporate earnings was proposed.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

1 – 10 of 318