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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Harry Martin, Aris A. Syntetos, Alejandro Parodi, Yiannis E. Polychronakis and Liliane Pintelon

This paper aims to substantiate the need for additional research into a more holistic and multidisciplinary approach to managing the supporting supply chains that may also…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to substantiate the need for additional research into a more holistic and multidisciplinary approach to managing the supporting supply chains that may also capture contextual information, also pointing out emerging avenues for further scholarly contributions.

Design/methodology/approach

The supply chain is viewed from a spare part consumer as well as from a supplier perspective. Key to the discussion is an accurate description of the maintenance demand pattern (MDP) known at the consumer's side as a valuable information source for the entire supply chain.

Findings

Solving the spare parts supply chain puzzle exceeds the realms of a single scientific discipline and involves hard and soft sciences. Besides, extending on the quantitative modelling aspects of MDPs, soft modelling and analysis is needed to define cooperative settings in which the supply chain parties can operate effectively.

Practical implications

In this paper, the authors argue for the sharing of the appropriately balanced combination of quantitative and qualitative information that is currently hidden, or exists in isolation, within supply chains. Debatably, such information sharing may potentially generate substantial benefits for all “players” within a given supply chain.

Originality/value

This contribution is unique in the sense that it provides a most accurate characterization of MDPs based on the proven maintenance concept design theory. In addition, the supply chain problem is analysed in a realistic context, with an open and broad mindset rather than approaching this issue from a single hard science perspective.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

John A. Parnell

Middle and lower‐level managers play a significant role in the strategic management process, primarily in the execution stage. However, strategic diffusion – the extent to…

Abstract

Purpose

Middle and lower‐level managers play a significant role in the strategic management process, primarily in the execution stage. However, strategic diffusion – the extent to which a strategy is effectively executed and becomes an integral part of the organization – varies across organizations. This paper aims to examine the strategic diffusion process in two emerging economies, Mexico and Peru.

Design/methodology/approach

Parnell's strategic diffusion scale (SDS) was adopted for this study. Respondents also completed Cook and Wall's nine‐item organizational commitment instrument and a three‐item scale measuring satisfaction with firm performance. Surveys were translated into Spanish and completed by 218 Mexican and 270 Peruvian managers.

Findings

Strategic diffusion was linked to performance satisfaction among both Mexican and Peruvian managers. Overall, Mexican managers produced higher scores on the strategic diffusion scale (SDS) than did their Peruvian counterparts. The link between strategic diffusion and organizational commitment among middle and lower‐level managers remains unclear.

Research limitations/implications

This study supports the strategic diffusion construct and the SDS. Three items in the scale were problematic in certain instances, however. The present study linked strategic diffusion to performance satisfaction in both Mexico and Peru. As expected, Mexican managers exhibited higher SDS scores than did their Peruvian counterparts. The link between strategic diffusion and organizational commitment was not strong, however. Additional research is needed in this area.

Practical implications

Middle and lower level managers in different countries have different views on the process of strategic diffusion. These distinctions are cause by a number of factors, including stages in the economic development cycle, organizational culture, and widely accepted management practices. Executives seeking to implement strategies should recognize the three key components of strategic diffusion – understanding, involvement, and commitment – and how they are influenced by national contexts.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of research assessing management behaviors in emerging nations. It is also important to learn more about processes associated with strategy execution in different organizations. This paper addresses both needs by assessing strategic diffusion in Mexico and Peru.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Soonkwan Hong and Chang-Ho Kim

The purpose of this paper is to unpack an Asian-born celebrity culture in which celebrities become everyday necessities for global consumers’ identity struggle, prototypes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to unpack an Asian-born celebrity culture in which celebrities become everyday necessities for global consumers’ identity struggle, prototypes for global branding strategy, contents for the media industry, and agents for sociocultural transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to better elucidate such a significant phenomenon, the authors also introduce two mostly palpable and more relevant domains of celebrity culture to global consumer culture literature − politics of aesthetics and memetics − as analytical tools. Observations and publicly available narratives are also incorporated to enhance the review and critique of the global celebrification process. Psy’s Gangnam Style (GS) is chosen as an archetype, due to its exceptionally vulgar but highly replicable nature.

Findings

The specific case of GS exposes three unique qualities of kitsch − exaggeration, disconcertment, and subversive sensibility − that are substantially commensurate with prototypical characteristics of globalized online memes − ordinariness, flawed masculinity, theatricality, and ludic agency. Polysemy and optimism also facilitate the celebrification process in global participatory culture.

Research limitations/implications

The “radical intertextuality” of online memes sustains the participatory culture in which kitsch becomes a global icon through a reproductive process. Korean popular culture cultivates reverse cosmopolitanism through a nationalistic self-orientalization strategy that paradoxically indigenizes western pop-culture and transforms power relations in global pop culture.

Originality/value

This paper presents further elaboration of current discourses on global-celebrity culture by incorporating popular concepts and practices, such as kitsch, meme, parody, and sharing, which synergistically advance aesthetic liberation on a global scale.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Sharon Purchase, Sid Lowe and Nick Ellis

An earlier researcher, Wood, proposed that cinema is the most appropriate metaphor for interpretation of contemporary life and organizations. The paper adopts the…

Abstract

Purpose

An earlier researcher, Wood, proposed that cinema is the most appropriate metaphor for interpretation of contemporary life and organizations. The paper adopts the enthusiasm for the cinema metaphor and explores the implications for industrial marketing and business networks, with particular reference to the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the Cartesian picture theory of the early Wittgenstein, the comparable “pictures agenda” within the IMP, then the post‐Cartesian “language gaming” approach adopted by the later Wittgenstein, and associates it with an agenda to introduce a more “cinematographic” approach, introducing issues within the “linguistic turn” to the study of business networks.

Findings

The transformation of the contemporary “post‐Cartesian” culture from “written” to “visual” was not fully appreciated until the invention and mass appeal of cinema and the concomitants of a visual culture became more apparent. In the notion of the “spectacle”, Debord was amongst the first to show that the postmodern visual culture was one where social relations are dominated by commodified images. The images that prevail, from this critical viewpoint, are “social opiates” masquerading as progress that control actors through addictive consumption and acquisition by spectator consumers. In this context, business to business relationships are about how these image‐based addictions are maintained within business cultures.

Research limitations/implications

The adoption of a cinematographic metaphor would appear to be a pertinent development for understanding of business network relationships.

Originality/value

The advantage of a cinematographic metaphor over other, less visual, metaphors is that cinema is more visually sophisticated and entirely embedded in cultures dominated by commodified images. It is appropriate, therefore, that visual literacy, realities as increasingly “image‐dominated” and “virtual” business networks are better understood through the lens of a cinematographic metaphor.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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