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Article

Miguel Moital, Julie Whitfield, Caroline Jackson and Arjun Bahl

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data regarding event sponsorship activity, perceptions of event sponsorship, motives to sponsor, form of investment and structure of sponsorship was obtained from a sample of 61 drinks producers in India through a questionnaire. Mann‐Whitney and logistic regression were employed to compare the alcoholic and the non‐alcoholic sectors.

Findings

The results suggest that the alcohol and non‐alcohol drinks sectors sponsored a similar level of events, but in investment volume terms, sponsorship from the non‐alcoholic sector is far greater than that of the alcoholic sector. While the two sectors are similar in many ways, the emphasis placed on certain motives for sponsoring events was different, with alcoholic drinks businesses placing greater importance on reaching niche audiences and increasing media coverage than non‐alcoholic ones.

Research limitations/implications

A limited number of areas of the sponsorship decision‐making were covered, yet the study provides insights into the decision making of one of the key sponsoring industries: the drinks industry.

Practical implications

Securing sponsorship is becoming more difficult and complex. By understanding how sponsors make decisions, including potential variations between companies within an industry, event organisers will be in a better position to tailor sponsorship proposals, enhancing the likelihood of obtaining the desired sponsorship contracts.

Originality/value

Most sponsor decision‐making research focuses on how sponsorship decisions can be improved so that they work better for the sponsor. This paper, in contrast, emphasises that by understanding how clients make decisions (i.e. sponsors), sellers (i.e. the sponsored) will be in a better position to win over competition and secure the desired sponsorship deals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Case study

Amonrat Thoumrungroje and Olimpia C. Racela

Corporate diversification, product portfolio analysis, industry structure, international business expansion, beverage industry.

Abstract

Subject area

Corporate diversification, product portfolio analysis, industry structure, international business expansion, beverage industry.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate MBA strategic management, international business strategy, and marketing strategy courses.

Case overview

Thai Beverage Public Company Limited (ThaiBev) was Thailand's largest beverage company and was among Asia's major alcoholic beverage companies. The case situation takes place during the latter part of August 2010, two years after the public announcement of ThaiBev's ambitious intentions to become a comprehensive and integrated beverage company and after having recently re-launched its acquired Wrangyer energy brand, a move signaling ThaiBev's strong commitment to its non-alcoholic beverages. The case describes the beverage industries at the global, regional, and country level and discusses ThaiBev's range of businesses. Marut Buranasetkul, Senior Vice President of Corporate Service and Deputy Managing Director of Thai Beverage Marketing, the sales and marketing arm of ThaiBev, must decide on the direction for ThaiBev to pursue to bring ThaiBev's non-alcoholic beverages to account for at least 10 percent of the company's total revenue. This case presents a number of important strategic topics, particularly in discussing industry structure and competition, as well as diversification issues encountered by a firm that was attempting to create a greater balance between the revenue contributions from its market leading dominant businesses and that of its younger and newer business lines.

Expected learning outcomes

Students will: understand the challenges faced by large conglomerates wanting to change their market position; learn to apply different frameworks such as Porter's Five Force Model, portfolio analysis, SWOT and to assess the competitive environment; learn to evaluate a company's current product portfolio and to recommend strategies to improve its allocation of resources; and learn to identify key success factors necessary to compete in a highly competitive industry.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

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Article

Paul Davie

The development of marketing thinking has been stimulated by the pressures of competition. If growing competition for more mature and discriminating markets is a major…

Abstract

The development of marketing thinking has been stimulated by the pressures of competition. If growing competition for more mature and discriminating markets is a major trend for the next decade, the pursuit of improved product quality and of excellence will be an essential management response. New product development is a vital part of marketing policy for all companies and organisations, as it represents one of the key means by which corporate renewal is achieved and a future secured. This article analyses new product development in the light of the new alcohol soft drink products, which presents a myriad of challenges and opportunities for beverage manufactures and the UK drinks market These drinks have been latched onto by brewers who were desperate to win over young people who had snubbed beer and cider; but their drive has backfired, with drinks such as Hoopers Hooch being condemned for their appeal towards the teenager. In view of this, the article will conclude by identifying the controversial implications these drinks will have for the future stability of the alcoholic soft drink market

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article

John Maisch, Mihai Nica and Jeremy David Oller

This study aims to examine whether the introduction of wine or regular strength beer (B) sales in Tennessee grocery stores significantly increased the number of alcoholic

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether the introduction of wine or regular strength beer (B) sales in Tennessee grocery stores significantly increased the number of alcoholic beverages (AB) consumed or excise taxes collected in the state.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses both a time series and a model-based approach to assess if a significant change in alcoholic beverage excise tax collections occurred after the natural experiment. The study evaluates monthly tax collections from B, mixed drinks and AB between January 1968 and September 2018 published by the Tennessee Department of Revenue.

Findings

The findings suggest that neither alcoholic beverage consumption nor excise taxes collected increased substantially in Tennessee as a result of the introduction of wine and regular strength B in grocery stores. It is likely, however, that some changes inside the industry were significant.

Originality/value

This study assists policymakers and analysts in determining whether allowing the sale of wine and regular strength B in grocery stores will have a substantial impact on the total amount of AB consumed or excise taxes collected by the jurisdiction.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article

Marina Barnard and Alasdair J.M. Forsyth

Assesses the popularity of the new alcoholic carbonates (alcopops) among 14‐15 year old schoolchildren. Considers the relationship between last occasion consumption of…

Abstract

Assesses the popularity of the new alcoholic carbonates (alcopops) among 14‐15 year old schoolchildren. Considers the relationship between last occasion consumption of alcopops and self‐reported drunkenness. These data are based on a follow‐up study of schoolchildren who self‐completed the same standard instrument in 1994 and two years later in 1997. The survey was carried out in five Dundee schools selected in consultation with the Local Education Authority. In 1994, schoolchildren in years S3‐4 aged 14‐15 were surveyed (n = 373). The survey was repeated again with S3‐4 pupils in 1996. Data from those pupils originally sampled as S1‐2 pupils and followed up at time 2 (n = 288) are included here. Alcopops were introduced onto the market three months after the first survey was carried out. By the time the original sample was recontacted in 1996, alcopops were the second most likely drink to be consumed by these under‐age drinkers (17.3 per cent drank alcopops, the same proportion as drank vodka, 20.8 per cent consumed ordinary beers on the last occasion). Despite the popularity of alcopops these drinks were not associated with drunkenness. Given the rate of increase in alcopop consumption between the two survey times, it is clear that the alcoholic carbonates are popular among under‐age drinkers. That these drinks are not associated with drunkenness suggests the importance of a better understanding of the decisions young people bring to bear on alcohol choice.

Details

Health Education, vol. 98 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article

Biasino Farace, Andrea Apicella and Angela Tarabella

The excessive consumption of alcohol in numerous countries in the world, combined with the progressively younger age of the consumers, made it necessary for companies to…

Abstract

Purpose

The excessive consumption of alcohol in numerous countries in the world, combined with the progressively younger age of the consumers, made it necessary for companies to use instruments of communication aimed at the development of consumption responsibility, so as to prevent reckless behaviour and the health risks thereto associated. The purpose of this paper is to assess the visibility and effectiveness of responsible consumption messages used for the sale of the product “beer” (on packaging and in advertisements); the study used a sample audience made up of teenagers and young adults from southern Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used was that of the focus group. Three interview sessions were conducted, one dedicated to teenagers, age 16–17 years, and two dedicated to young adult panels, age 20–24 years. A ten-question questionnaire was designed prior to the conduction of the focus groups, and it was used in all the sessions.

Findings

The study shows the weak efficacy of the “drink responsibly” communication campaigns carried out by beer manufacturers. The totality of the interviewees failed to remember the existence of the “drink responsibly” messages and, even after supplementary visual stimulation, they were mostly disinterested, defining the fact that companies from the alcoholic drinks industry carry out consumption awareness campaigns as an out-and-out nonsensical contradiction.

Originality/value

The survey draws attention to the perception by young audiences of the more recent “drink responsibly” communication campaigns carried out by beer manufacturers, aiming at encouraging a more responsible attitude to alcohol consumption. There still are not many such inquests aimed at determining the response of young people to the use of slogans and commercials connected to responsible drinking in the literature; therefore, this study aimed at filling this gap. In fact, the authors believe this study is important for assessing the effectiveness of such instruments for achieving greater responsibility in the use of alcoholic drinks, so as to develop better awareness in the ranks of youths. Among the new communication strategies that were proposed to the participants, there were video commercials containing responsible consumption messages and the new prohibition marks placed directly on the product labels.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Tony Spawton

The changes that are occurring in the international market foralcoholic drinks are addressed and implications on how these changeswill affect the marketing of wine in the…

Abstract

The changes that are occurring in the international market for alcoholic drinks are addressed and implications on how these changes will affect the marketing of wine in the future are made. The article identifies that the wine industry is not one but two industries which will deploy quite different tactics to meet future threats and opportunities. It is also argued that wine marketing issues in the future will be at the forefront of wine company research and decision making.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Margaret K. Hogg, Alastair J. Cox and Kathy Keeling

The relationship between self‐image and product/brand imagery remains an important area of concern in marketing research and marketing practice because of its impact on…

Abstract

The relationship between self‐image and product/brand imagery remains an important area of concern in marketing research and marketing practice because of its impact on product/brand evaluation and choice; however many studies report inconclusive findings about this relationship. A conceptual model is developed which links a function of attitudes – as the pursuit and maintenance of self‐esteem and self‐identity – to the public and private contexts of self‐concepts; and the subsequent intrinsic and extrinsic congruence between brand evaluation and choice. In this exploratory study the Self‐Monitoring Scale is used to explore the link between the social and psychological determinants of self‐presentation in the pursuit of self‐esteem and maintenance of self‐identity, and to inform the examination of the relationship between self‐concept and product symbolism. Findings from the qualitative and quantitative stages of a study of the UK alcoholic soft drinks market are presented. There were distinct differences between the self‐monitoring groups when the interpretation of specific brand images was investigated. The results provided empirical support for viewing the self as a divisible entity. The implications for marketing practice are discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Elizabeth Meerabeau, Roy Gillett, Michael Kennedy, Johnson Adeoba, Michael Byass and Kingsley Tabi

Sponsorship has been a growth area in the marketing mix through the1980s with “corporate” aims joining brand‐directedobjectives in recent years. The alcoholic drinks

Abstract

Sponsorship has been a growth area in the marketing mix through the 1980s with “corporate” aims joining brand‐directed objectives in recent years. The alcoholic drinks industry has now the second biggest sponsorship spend of any sector. The market is subdivided into five areas. Sports sponsorship has traditionally been the largest sector but new legislation is likely to see sponsorship of the media, especially television, increase very rapidly, at the expense of involvement in sports. Many pundits also foresee a rise in resources applied to the arts, education, social and charitable sponsorship. The drinks industry is likely to make greater use of corporate sponsorship to achieve a positive image to help fight off restrictive legislation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 25 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Per Jenster and Yiting Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evolutionary view of the emerging wine industry in China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evolutionary view of the emerging wine industry in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Research on industry evolution provides a background for the historical evolution of the Chinese wine industry. Case studies are used to illustrate the different strategies of the leading wine producers in China, and to identify the major concerns and challenges in the Chinese wine industry. Growth potentials and ongoing trends are supported with statistics from authoritative databases and Chinese wine industry associations.

Findings

The Chinese wine market is characterized by an increasing concentration where the top four domestic producers dominate with 50 per cent market share. The lack of a wine culture makes brand marketing crucial to business success. Limited international efforts have been made by Chinese wine producers, although one winery has embarked on capturing 50 per cent of the global ice‐wine industry.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a historical overview of the Chinese wine industry and its current situation, which could not elude generalization and simplification. Enormous regional diversity in China compels differentiated regional studies in terms of production, consumer behaviors and marketing strategies.

Practical implications

The historical evolution of the Chinese wine industry reveals different settings for wine business in China. The dominance of domestic wine companies and ignorance of foreign wine brands among the general public imply a tough setting for foreign wine makers and distributors to enter the market.

Originality/value

The paper provides some insight into the historical and ongoing development of the Chinese wine market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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