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Article

Holly M. Thompson, Josephine Previte, Sarah Kelly and Adrian.B. Kelly

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of macro-level regulatory systems on alcohol management for community sport organisations (CSOs). It examines how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of macro-level regulatory systems on alcohol management for community sport organisations (CSOs). It examines how alcohol regulations translate into meso-level management actions and interactions that impact alcohol consumption in community sport clubs.

Design/methodology/approach

Management of alcohol was explored through the holistic lens of macro, meso, and micro-levels of influence. Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with Australian club administrators from community sports clubs.

Findings

Thematic analysis revealed macro-level influences on alcohol management in CSOs, with government regulations and the state sport associations being the most influential. Challenges arise in alcohol policy implementation when sport administrators do not prioritise alcohol consumption as a problem to be addressed, or where a conflict of interest arises between alcohol revenue generation and clubs positioning as health promoting environments.

Practical implications

Targeting club administrators’ attitudes towards alcohol as a benign influence and revising alcohol management practices are recommended as priority strategies to enhance the implementation and promotion of responsible alcohol management in sport clubs. Affiliate state sport associations were also identified as influential settings to provide administrative or strategic direction to CSOs, which would reduce the resources required by volunteers and standardise alcohol management practices across sports clubs.

Originality/value

The prevailing alcohol research focuses on the consumption behaviour of individual members and sports players. The study findings are novel and important as they explore the macro-level influences that administrators experience when enacting and policing alcohol management strategies in sports clubs. To-date, administrators of CSOs have not been included in many studies about alcohol consumption regulation; therefore, the findings provide an original perspective on alcohol regulation and demonstrate how CSOs operationalise alcohol management in club settings. The original insights from this study informed the conceptualisation of a multilevel sport system framework, which can be applied to guide future governance of alcohol consumption in sport settings.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article

Andrew McPherson and George Benson

The Glasgow acute addiction liaison nurse service provides a unique service to patients with alcohol and drug issues who are admitted to general hospitals in the Glasgow…

Abstract

The Glasgow acute addiction liaison nurse service provides a unique service to patients with alcohol and drug issues who are admitted to general hospitals in the Glasgow City area. It offers guidance on withdrawal management, educates patients and staff and provides a facility to refer to appropriate community services. Since its foundation in 2005, patient referrals have increased by more than 3,000. Additionally, it has taken on a greater educational role and is more involved in research and evaluation.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article

Louise Learmonth and Helene Leslie

In 1992, a Scottish Office grant was awarded to develop a nurse‐led alcohol liaison service for patients within a busy general hospital (Leslie & Learmonth, 1994).This…

Abstract

In 1992, a Scottish Office grant was awarded to develop a nurse‐led alcohol liaison service for patients within a busy general hospital (Leslie & Learmonth, 1994).This project was based on previous research conducted in the same hospital that concluded that early detection of alcohol problems and minimal intervention could considerably reduce long‐term alcohol‐related damage (Chick et al., 1985). A first article describing the service was published in 1994 (Leslie & Learmonth). This follow‐up article aims to describe how the service has developed and expanded since then. This includes the many issues we have encountered on our path to a greater understanding and delivery of specialist alcohol service.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article

Lolita Alfred, Mark Limmer and Susan Cartwright

Alcohol workplace policies (AWPs) can help organizations to manage and support employees with alcohol-related problems. Over the last two decades, there has been a slow…

Abstract

Purpose

Alcohol workplace policies (AWPs) can help organizations to manage and support employees with alcohol-related problems. Over the last two decades, there has been a slow but steady rise of research on AWPs with some indication that these can contribute to reducing employee excessive consumption. However, there does not appear to be any empirical literature reviews to consolidate and evaluate what this body of evidence says regarding the impact of these policies. The following review seeks to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Five electronic databases were searched for papers published between January 1996 and January 2020. To capture additional relevant papers (including those from non-peer reviewed sources), the search was extended to Google Scholar, professional and human resource management websites, trade publications and the website of one United Kingdom (UK)-based alcohol charity. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to systematically screen the paper titles, abstracts and full-text records. 14 papers were deemed eligible and therefore included in the integrative review. After extracting data, all 14 papers were appraised for quality and then analysed using the narrative synthesis guide by Popay et al. (2006).

Findings

Five themes were identified, namely, Associations between Policy and Consumption Levels/Patterns, Deterrence, Policy and Programme Type, Knowledge and Understanding and Enforcement and Discipline. These themes encapsulated what the included papers concluded about the impact and associated benefits or challenges of AWPs.

Research limitations/implications

This review identifies that despite the benefits of AWPs, up to 40% of workplaces do not have these policies in place. Future research needs to explicitly explore the reasons for this.

Practical implications

This review highlights that AWPs can benefit employees and workplaces. Therefore, organizations are encouraged to develop and implement AWPs to support health improvement and prevention of alcohol problems in the workplace.

Originality/value

This review provides a current synthesis of literature published over the last two decades regarding the impact of AWPs on employees and workplaces.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Liam North, Louise Gillard‐Owen, Debbie Bannigan and Chris Robinson

This paper provides an overview of the evidence base for alcohol‐related brain injury (ARBI) and describes how this has been used to develop a pilot programme for the…

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the evidence base for alcohol‐related brain injury (ARBI) and describes how this has been used to develop a pilot programme for the treatment of ARBI. Key components include: detoxification, assessment, social behaviour network therapy, cognitive rehabilitation and systematic instruction. The programme is being delivered and evaluated in the north of England by Swanswell, a national drug and alcohol treatment charity.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article

J. Hyman and P.B. Beaumont

Recent developments in alcohol policies provide tangible signs that major strands of personnel policy are beginning to merge (concern for welfare, corporate efficiency and…

Abstract

Recent developments in alcohol policies provide tangible signs that major strands of personnel policy are beginning to merge (concern for welfare, corporate efficiency and joint determination through collective agreement) as indicated by a survey of alcohol policies carried out in Britain.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Tanja Kamin and Daša Kokole

Alcohol availability is strongly related to excessive alcohol consumption. This study aims to examine social marketing’s response to concerns about retailers…

Abstract

Purpose

Alcohol availability is strongly related to excessive alcohol consumption. This study aims to examine social marketing’s response to concerns about retailers’ noncompliance with the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) law by proposing and evaluating a social marketing intervention directed at sellers in off-premise stores.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a non-randomized quasi-experimental design, focusing on an evaluation of the implementation of the “18 rules!” intervention in four cities in Slovenia. Two waves of underage purchase attempts were conducted pre- and post-intervention in 24 off-premise businesses, following a mystery shopping protocol.

Findings

The initial rate of retailers’ noncompliance with the MLDA law in off-premise establishments was high. After the social marketing intervention, an increase with compliance with the law was observed; the proportion of cashiers selling alcohol to minors after the intervention decreased from 96 to 67 per cent. Qualitative insight suggests an existence of retailers’ dilemma in complying with the MLDA.

Research limitations/implications

A social marketing approach could contribute to a better understanding of the social working of the MLDA law.

Practical implications

A social marketing approach could complement the usual enforcement strategies and contribute to a better understanding of the social working of the MLDA law, and encourage deliberate retailers’ compliance with it while developing valuable exchanges among people and stakeholders.

Originality/value

The paper conceptualizes retailers’ dilemma in complying with the minimal legal drinking age law and offers social marketing response to it. Results of the study show that also solely non-coercive measures have the potential in increasing retailers’ compliance with regulations.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article

George Benson, Nicola Roberts, Jacqueline McCallum and Andrew McPherson

The purpose of this paper is to identify published literature from a general hospital setting that may highlight variables implicated in the development of severe alcohol

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify published literature from a general hospital setting that may highlight variables implicated in the development of severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome (SAWS) in patients who have alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS).

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was carried out using the electronic databases: MEDLINE, Medline in Process, Cinahl, Embase and PsycINFO from 1989 to 2017. The focus of this search was on English language studies of individuals over 16 years admitted to general hospital with ADS, delirium tremens (DTs), alcohol-related seizure (ARS) or alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS).

Findings

Of the 205 studies screened, eight met the criteria for inclusion. Six studies were quantitative retrospective cohort and two were retrospective case-control. Six studies investigated risk factors associated with DTs, one examined SAWS and one alcohol kindling. Descriptive analysis was performed to summarise the empirical evidence from studies were 22 statistically significant risk factors were found; including the reason for admission to hospital, daily alcohol consumption, previous DTs and prior ARS. The last two factors mentioned appeared in two studies.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should consider the quality and completeness of the alcohol history data and competence of staff generating the data in retrospective studies.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that the factors linked to SAWS development from the literature may not fully explain why some individuals who have ADS develop SAWS, and others do not.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article

Linda Brennan, Josephine Previte and Marie-Louise Fry

Addressing calls for broadening social marketing thinking beyond “individualistic” parameters, this paper aims to describe a behavioural ecological systems (BEM) approach…

Abstract

Purpose

Addressing calls for broadening social marketing thinking beyond “individualistic” parameters, this paper aims to describe a behavioural ecological systems (BEM) approach to enhance understanding of social markets.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework – the BEM – is presented and discussed within a context of alcohol social change.

Findings

The BEM emphasises the relational nature of behaviour change, where individuals are embedded in an ecological system that involves the performances of behaviour and social change within historical, social, cultural, physical and environmental settings. Layers of influence on actors are characterised as macro (distant, large in scale), exo (external, remote from individuals), meso (between the individual and environments) and micro (the individual within their social setting). The BEM can be applied to guide social marketers towards creating solutions that focus on collaboration amongst market actors rather than among consumers.

Practical implications

The BEM contributes to a broader holistic view of social ecologies and behaviour change; emphasises the need for social marketers to embrace systems thinking; and recognises that relationships between actors at multiple layers in social change markets are interactive, collaborative and embedded in dynamic social contexts. Importantly, a behavioural ecological systems approach enables social marketers to develop coherent, integrated and multi-dimensional social change programmes.

Originality/value

The underlying premise of the BEM brings forward relational logic as the foundation for future social marketing theory and practice. Taking this approach to social market change focuses strategy on the intangible aspects of social offerings, inclusive of the interactions and processes of value creation (and/or destruction) within a social marketing system to facilitate collaboration and interaction across a network of actors so as to overcome barriers and identify solutions to social problems.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article

George Benson, Andrew McPherson, Jacqueline McCallum and Nicola Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to develop an alcohol withdrawal syndrome risk stratification tool that could support the safe discharge of low risk patients from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an alcohol withdrawal syndrome risk stratification tool that could support the safe discharge of low risk patients from the emergency department.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective cohort study that included all patients referred to the acute addiction liaison nursing service over one calendar month (n=400, 1–30 April 2016) was undertaken. Bivariate and multivariate modelling identified the significant variables that supported the prediction of severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome (SAWS) in the cohort population.

Findings

The Glasgow Modified Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (GMAWS), hours since last drink, fast alcohol screening test (FAST) and systolic blood pressure correctly identified 89 per cent of patients who developed SAWS and 84 per cent of patients that did not. Increasing each component by a score of one is associated with an increase in the odds of SAWS by a factor of 2.76 (95% CI 2.21, 3.45), 1.31 (95% CI 1.24, 1.37), 1.30 (95% CI 1.08, 1.57) and 1.22 (95% CI 1.10, 1.34), respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted in a single healthcare system that had a high prevalence of alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS). Second, the developed risk stratification tool was unable to guarantee no risk and lastly, the FAST score previously aligned to severe ADS may have influenced the patients highest GMAWS score.

Practical implications

The tool could help redesign the care pathway for patients who attend the emergency department at risk of SAWS and link low risk patients with community alcohol services better equipped to deal with their physical and psychological needs short and long term supporting engagement, abstinence and prolongation of life.

Originality/value

The tool could help redesign the care pathway for emergency department patients at low risk of SAWS and link them with community alcohol services better equipped to deal with their physical and psychological needs, short and long term, supporting engagement, abstinence and prolongation of life.

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