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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Anitha Chinnaswamy, Armando Papa, Luca Dezi and Alberto Mattiacci

The World Health Organisation estimates that 92 per cent of the world’s population does not have access to clean air. The World Bank in 2013 estimated that only air…

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Abstract

Purpose

The World Health Organisation estimates that 92 per cent of the world’s population does not have access to clean air. The World Bank in 2013 estimated that only air pollution (AP) was responsible for a $225bn cost in lost productivity. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the current scholarly debate on the value of Big Data for effective healthcare management. Its focus on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in developing countries, a major cause of disability and premature death and a subject of increasing research in recent years, makes this research particularly valuable.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to assess the effects of AP on CVD in developing countries, the city of Bangalore was selected as a case study. Bangalore is one of the fastest growing economies in India, representative of the rapidly growing cities in the developing world. Demographic, AP and CVD data sets covering more than 1m historic records were obtained from governmental organisations. The spatial analysis of such data sets allowed visualisation of the correlation between the demographics of the city, the levels of pollution and deaths caused by CVDs, thus informing decision making in several sectors and at different levels.

Findings

Although there is increasing concern in councils and other responsible governmental agencies, resources required to monitor and address the challenges of pollution are limited due to the high costs involved. This research shows that with developments in the domains of Big Data, Internet of Things and smart cities, opportunities to monitor pollution result in high volumes of data. Existing technologies for data analytics can empower decision makers and even the public with knowledge on pollution. This paper has demonstrated a methodological approach for the collection and visual representation of Big Data sets allowing for an understanding of the spread of CVDs across the city of Bangalore, enabling different stakeholders to query the data sets and reveal specific statistics of key hotspots where action is required.

Originality/value

This research has been conducted to demonstrate the value of Big Data in generating a strategic knowledge-driven decision-support system to provide focused and targeted interventions for environmental health management. This case study research is based on the use of a geographic information system for the visualisation of a Big Data set collected from Bangalore, a region in India seriously affected by pollution.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Alberto Mattiacci, Attilio Bruni, Francesca Magno and Fabio Cassia

Although sales activities in the wine industry are becoming increasingly important, there has been little research on the sales capabilities in wine businesses. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Although sales activities in the wine industry are becoming increasingly important, there has been little research on the sales capabilities in wine businesses. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by examining the most important salesperson and sales management capabilities and emerging trends related to the management of sales capabilities in the wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical analysis based on an explorative research design was conducted in the Italian wine industry. Sales directors from 4 of the 30 largest Italian wine producers were interviewed. Textual data were analysed using template analysis.

Findings

Analysis of the findings revealed the most important capabilities of salespeople and sales managers and identified four emerging trends related to sales capability management in the wine industry – capabilities enrichment, capabilities balance, capabilities specialisation and capabilities acquisition process.

Research limitations/implications

Given that only large wine producers in the Old World were interviewed, caution should be exercised before extending the findings to small and medium-sized players and to those in the New World.

Practical implications

The trends identified in this study provide actionable insights for designing strategies to manage sales capabilities in wine businesses.

Originality/value

This was one of the first studies to address the capabilities of salespeople and sales managers and to provide an in-depth examination of sales capability management trends in the wine industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Costanza Nosi, Alberto Mattiacci and Fabiola Sfodera

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how grape varieties are narrated online by non-winery-owned sources in four countries: Australia, Canada the UK and the USA…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how grape varieties are narrated online by non-winery-owned sources in four countries: Australia, Canada the UK and the USA. This study focuses on Sangiovese, the most important varietal of Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

Texts collected on the Internet underwent a software-assisted semantic clustering procedure based on text-mining techniques. Identified clusters were then qualitatively analyzed by content.

Findings

The digital narrative on Sangiovese is mainly technical and conveyed by adopting a professional slant that is suitable for knowledgeable consumers but less effective for common and unexperienced wine drinkers. Online information is concentrated in few websites that act as information gatekeepers.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the wine-related managerial literature on grape varieties, which are considered one of the most powerful factors in addressing consumer wine choice. Additionally, the investigation sheds light on the online wine ecosystem, by providing insights on how information is provided and the contents that are conveyed on the Internet. The findings of this study may be useful for Italian operators willing to promote Sangiovese-based wines in foreign markets.

Originality/value

Though explorative in nature, this study represents one of the first attempts to investigate the online narrative of grape varieties by presenting a marketing perspective and examining the characteristics of non-winery-owned online information which may shape wine consumers’ behavior.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Enrico Bonetti, Alberto Mattiacci and Michele Simoni

The purpose of this paper is to identify the communication patterns adopted by special organisations, called Producers’ Consortia, to promote Protected Designation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the communication patterns adopted by special organisations, called Producers’ Consortia, to promote Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) products. In particular, the paper analyses the key differences among the communication patterns in terms of the task assigned to communication, the communication tools employed to convey key messages to customers and the amount of the budget allocated to the mix of communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analysed the communication activities conducted by all the Italian Consortia (112 in total) over a period of four years. A centred log-ratio transformation (clr) was applied to make the compositional data treatable in the Euclidean space. A clustering procedure was then followed to identify the different communication patterns adopted by the Consortia. The authors adopted an analytical framework where different communication patterns of Consortia are identified by the mostly used types (traditional advertising, public relations and digital communication) and the corresponding aimed consumer response (i.e. awareness, attitude and engagement).

Findings

This paper identifies four relevant and different communication patterns that co-exist in the Italian PDO market. Each pattern responds to a different logic and focusses on a specific task assigned to communication: to increase the awareness of the PDO label, to improve the attitude towards the PDO products and to enhance the engagement with the PDO’s values.

Research limitations/implications

PDO products are key assets of a growing relevance for the European agri-food industry and consumer education is at the very core of the PDO labelling system. By law, the Consortia are in charge of the crucial task of communicating to customers. This research suggests that the communication of PDO is a complex activity that requires a careful choice of the right communication mix. Different patterns are driven by specific logic and are suitable for Consortia with different characteristics. Future research could complete the results of this study using a qualitative analysis of the content of communication activities. Caution should be used when generalising these findings to markets that present relevant differences in consumer food culture.

Practical implications

This research identifies some possible communication mixes that managers of the Consortia can adopt to promote PDO products and some options that can guide the development of their communication activities over time.

Originality/value

This work adds value to the literature on food marketing, and more specifically on food communication, by analysing the yet underexplored issue of how PDO products can be promoted in the “post-modern” food consumption era.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Fabiola Sfodera, Alberto Mattiacci, Costanza Nosi and Isabella Mingo

The paper investigates the role of social networks in the millennials’ decision-making process of illegal and unnotified food supplements purchase. The connections and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper investigates the role of social networks in the millennials’ decision-making process of illegal and unnotified food supplements purchase. The connections and interactions that (co) produce information are studied with a holistic perspective of social sustainability as a development driver of business model innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative multiple analysis study was conducted in two consecutive phases. Data from 23 semi-structured individual interviews were collected, followed by a netnographic analysis of the Facebook virtual community.

Findings

The results show that the decision-making process does not develop following the traditional sequence, as social networks modify the wellness meaning creation process and reduce risk perception. Moreover, social networks introduce the use of similar experiences of others and online information and emotional support on unethical and unhealthy behavior.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the application to a social network, the results should be understood within this context. Future studies would benefit by expanding the target and the range of social networks explored.

Practical implications

The official information quality control, as a prerogative of public and professional health stakeholders, and the medialization of medicalization, contribute to the conscious development of their wellness meanings and values.

Originality/value

This work represents one of the first attempts to investigate resources integration through social networks in the pre-purchase decision-making process of unnotified and illegal food supplements. Unethical and unhealthy behavior develops through the interaction of actors, firms, influencers and individuals over social networks.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Claudio Vignali and Alberto Mattiacci

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361

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Alberto Mattiacci and Claudio Vignali

The choice of typical products as an area of autonomous business with great potential comes from the development of a scenario of supply made up of important trends …

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4182

Abstract

The choice of typical products as an area of autonomous business with great potential comes from the development of a scenario of supply made up of important trends – within wealthy countries – that simultaneously invested in: the economy, the agricultural sector, the agro‐food sector and, on the same level, in the tourist industry and (of consumption) in the cultural sector, in the broad sense. It is well‐known that the more significant traits of the matter are connected to the following elements: globalisation; the increased use of technology in agricultural production; the renewed concept of territory; the “philosophical” change of agricultural policies; the great fragmentation of the tourist industry; the tensions generated by public opinion towards subjects like food safety, exacerbated by recent shocking events (mad cow disease, GMO, etc.); and new food consumption behaviour. The definition and background of typical food products are located in these varied elements.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Alberto Mattiacci and Vincenzo Zampi

None of the numerous food products that comprise the Italian food tradition can boast of business revitalisation as much as that which involved the wine industry in Italy…

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1154

Abstract

None of the numerous food products that comprise the Italian food tradition can boast of business revitalisation as much as that which involved the wine industry in Italy and in the rest of the world in the last decade. This is not the appropriate moment to consider the reasons for this change, nor is it the right place to compare the industrial situations of that time with those present today. Rapidly covering the field of the extensive history of the wine business, it is sufficient to cite certain simplified facts in order to show how the end user of the product – the consumer – has dramatically changed his consumption history, which initiated the process of regeneration of the business, a process never before seen, in the world of agricultural industries. The companies in the vine‐growing and wine‐making business have been both the driving force and the beneficiaries of this state of affairs. Indeed, to have a clearer picture, a hypothetical external person, observing the wine business panorama today, would notice clear features and company models, that are unrelated to the historical past of the industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Alberto Guenzi

This paper aims to approach the issue of premium offers in Italy by discussing the case study of Fabbri, a firm operating since 1905 in the business of liqueurs, syrups…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to approach the issue of premium offers in Italy by discussing the case study of Fabbri, a firm operating since 1905 in the business of liqueurs, syrups and semi-manufactured products for ice cream.

Design/methodology/approach

The research takes into analysis three marketing schemes, all related to direct premium promotions, adopted by Fabbri at various times during the twentieth century. The evolution of the company’s marketing strategy is outlined drawing on several types of sources: archive documents, posters and labels and audiovisual material. It is analysed in the socio-economic and legal context of twentieth century Italy, and in comparison with premium offers in the USA and Europe.

Findings

The study argues that direct premium may represent a long-lasting and efficient marketing strategy when a firm is able to adapt it to a context that changes over time. Fabbri not only used premium offers to launch its products but also to consolidate its brand image.

Research limitations/implications

By showing that innovative promotions are not necessarily connected to large firms, Fabbri’s case suggests that further research should be carried out to outline marketing policies carried out by small to medium enterprises.

Originality/value

Much has been written on premium offers in the USA and in Europe, but very little on such types of promotions in Italy, especially with reference to direct premiums. This study fills this gap and documents that a small family-owned firm was able to carry out innovative marketing policies as far as in the 1920s.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Fahimeh Khatami, Alberto Ferraris, Paola De Bernardi and Valter Cantino

This paper empirically tests the relationship between food heritage, familiness, and clan culture, thus, highlighting the pivotal role of familiness in building robustly…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper empirically tests the relationship between food heritage, familiness, and clan culture, thus, highlighting the pivotal role of familiness in building robustly competitive food firms based on clan culture and food heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach adopted is based on a quantitative analysis with data from one eco-tourist city in Iran (Torqabeh). In this regard, we developed a structured questionnaire surveying 98 small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operating in the food industry. We then used partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to carry out the analysis.

Findings

The results indicate the significant positive relationship between food heritage and clan culture, and highlight the role of familiness as a strong mediator, which is also associated with a strong relationship between food heritage and clan culture.

Research limitations/implications

In the present study, the main limitation was linked to the small sample size and data collection, which took place in only a single city; however, further research could overcome this limitation by investigating SMEs from a heterogeneous geographical context.

Originality/value

The value of this research relates to studies that have examined food heritage as a possible antecedent of familiness. Moreover, the novelty of this research is to study the concept of familiness in improving resource-based views and organizational theories.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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