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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Albert Lee and Robin Man-biu Cheung

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how professional cultures in schools and school systems could improve the well-being of students, with a particular emphasis on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how professional cultures in schools and school systems could improve the well-being of students, with a particular emphasis on teacher-health partnerships, which would not naturally occur without a specific intentional intervention. Implemented with a whole-school approach, the Health Promoting School (HPS) is one of the most effective intentional interventions to achieve improvements in both the health and educational outcomes of students through the engagement of key stakeholders in education and health to create a healthy physical/psycho-social environment. This paper emphasizes collaboration and the building of professional cultures in schools that share collective responsibility for the whole student.

Design/methodology/approach

Student outcomes in schools should include both academic and health and well-being outcomes that promote positive pathways throughout adulthood. This paper connects HPS research with policy analysis drawing on Hong Kong’s unique context as being at the top of the PISA rankings and striving toward a positive health culture and well-being in its schools.

Findings

Evidence has been gathered extensively about what schools actually do in health promotion using the HPS framework. The HPS framework has served to assist schools and authorities to concentrate on the gaps and affirm best practices. This paper also reports how teachers have created a professional and collegial community with health partners to address outbreaks of infectious diseases in schools and obesity in students.

Practical implications

The concept of HPS can serve as an ecological model to promote the positive health and well-being of students, fostering their personal growth and development, and as an alternate model for school improvement.

Social implications

This paper has highlighted that structured school health programs such as HPS could have positive effects on educational outcomes, while also changing professional cultures and communities in schools with an emphasis on students’ physical health, emotional health, social health, or spiritual health. The Assessment Program for Affective and Social Outcomes is used as a tool by schools in Hong Kong, reflecting the affective and social developments of the students in the school under review as a whole, and how they relate to the school. It resembles the core areas of action competencies, and school social environment; the two key areas of HPS.

Originality/value

Hong Kong is often analyzed from an educational rankings perspective. However, it offers broader lessons on educational change, as it has in recent years emphasized dual goals in student outcomes and professional communities – the importance of whole student health and well-being as a both a precursor and key component to the educational outcomes schools seek. Globally, very few schools are able to implement HPS in its entirety. Continuing development of HPS in Hong Kong would add value to international literature in terms of which types of data would influence adoption of HPS in which types of school and policy contexts.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sheau-yueh Janey Chao

This article was based on the information from The 5th International Conference of Institutes and Libraries for Chinese Overseas Studies held in the University of British…

Abstract

Purpose

This article was based on the information from The 5th International Conference of Institutes and Libraries for Chinese Overseas Studies held in the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC, Canada in which the author was a presenter in session 4.2.9a of the Early life of Yuan Shikai and the formation of Yuan family. The paper aims to include comprehensive analysis and development of the history of Chinese migration. An annotated bibliography of suggested readings was offered to highlight the subject knowledge for further research in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes comprehensive analysis and development of the history of Chinese migration and the experiences and family histories of overseas Chinese in Canada. An annotated bibliography of suggested readings was offered to highlight the subject knowledge for further research in this area.

Findings

The paper offers full description and comprehensive analysis of the history of Chinese migration and overseas Chinese studies in Canada. A bbibliography of suggested readings was offered for further research in this area.

Research limitations/implications

This research study has a strong subject focus on Chinese migration, overseas Chinese studies, and resource-sharing in the subject area. It is a specific field for research in Asian studies.

Practical implications

The result of this study will assist students, researchers, and the general public in the area of overseas Chinese studies and developing their interests in the social and historical value of Chinese migration history and resource-sharing in the area.

Originality/value

Very little research has been done in the area of Chinese migration and historical development. The paper would offer historians, sociologists, ethnologists, librarians, administrations, professors, as well as students in the fields of Asian history, anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, and other Asian-related interdisciplinary studies.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Yi-Ping Shih

By using ethnographic data and family interviews from eight families in Taipei, Taiwan, this paper aims to delineate how multigenerational families implement parents…

Abstract

By using ethnographic data and family interviews from eight families in Taipei, Taiwan, this paper aims to delineate how multigenerational families implement parents’ child-rearing values, and how these strategies vary by social class. The primary focus is the child’s mother and her relationship with other family members. I ask the following question: How does a mother in a three-generation family implement her ideal parenting values for her child while being encumbered by the constraints of her parents-in-law? Additionally, how does this intergenerational dynamic vary with family socioeconomic status? To conceptualize this process in such a complex context, I argue that we must understand parenting behaviors as acts of “doing family” and “intensive mothering.”

From 2008 to 2009, I conducted a pilot survey in two public elementary schools to recruit the parents of sixth-grade students. All eight cases of multigenerational families in this paper were selected randomly after being clustered by the parent’s highest education level and family income levels. This paper utilized the mothers’ interviews as the major source to analyze, while the interviews of other family members served as supplementary data.

Two cases, Mrs Lee and Mrs Su’s stories, were selected here to illustrate two distinctive approaches toward childrearing in multi-generational families. Results indicate that white-collar mothers in Taiwan hold the value of concerted cultivation and usually picture the concept of intensive mothering as their ideal image of parenthood. Yet, such an ideal and more westernized child-rearing philosophy often leads to tensions at home, particularly between the mother and the mother-in-law. Meanwhile, blue-collar mothers tend to collaborate with grandparents in sharing childcare responsibilities, and oftentimes experience friction over child discipline in terms of doing homework and material consumption.

Via this analysis of three-generation families in Taiwan, we are able to witness the struggle of contemporary motherhood in East Asia. This paper foregrounds the negotiations that these mothers undertake in defining ideal parenting and the ideal family. On the one hand, these mothers must encounter the new parenting culture, given that the cultural ideal of concerted cultivation has become a popular ideology. On the other hand, by playing the role of daughter-in-law, they must negotiate within the conventional, patriarchal family norms.

Details

Transitions into Parenthood: Examining the Complexities of Childrearing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-222-0

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

– Describes how Stonegate Pub Company has introduced a career-development pathway with scientist Albert Einstein as its figurehead.

Abstract

Purpose

Describes how Stonegate Pub Company has introduced a career-development pathway with scientist Albert Einstein as its figurehead.

Design/methodology/approach

Examines the reasons for the pathway and its associated training, the form it takes and the results it has achieved.

Findings

Explains that the program has been successful in reducing employee turnover, increasing the number of vacancies filled from within the firm and improving customer service.

Practical implications

Reveals that Stonegate Pub Company, which recently opened a dedicated training center in Birmingham, UK, won the Innovation in Training award at the Scottish Training Federation’s 2014 awards, in recognition for its successful Albert’s Apprenticeships.

Social implications

Demonstrates that the design is fun, quirky, engaging and irreverent, with a desire to appeal to the disengaged learner, the gamer and the personalities who make up a large percentage of the company’s teams.

Originality/value

Shows how initial research followed by continuous improvement has resulted in an exceptional employee training and development program that has outstripped the company’s expectations of it.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Abstract

Details

SDG3 – Good Health and Wellbeing: Re-Calibrating the SDG Agenda: Concise Guides to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-709-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Albert Lee, Vera Mei-wan Keung, Amelia Siu-chee Lo, Amy Chi-ming Kwong and Erin Sophie Armstrong

Successful implementation of Health Promoting Schools (HPS) depends on putting the model in the schools’ context for both health improvement and school improvement. HPS…

Abstract

Purpose

Successful implementation of Health Promoting Schools (HPS) depends on putting the model in the schools’ context for both health improvement and school improvement. HPS can only be effective if the change can be sustained over an extended duration. The purpose of this paper is to discuss development of the HPS process by University Research Centre in Hong Kong, resulting in an award scheme, where no additional resources were initially provided by the authorities.

Design/methodology/approach

The team adopted a step-by-step approach starting with capacity building of key stakeholders and comprehensive needs assessment, leading to development of a system of evaluation and monitoring and establishment of a “Healthy School Award” system. The system was built on data derived from several different sources and made use of qualitative and quantitative information and were intended to be used to guide practice and actions for improvement.

Findings

Schools measured their own performance against established school and student health profiles. The validated system of evaluation and monitoring led to a Healthy School Award scheme for participating schools with “accredited” and “award” designations. The award system evaluated six key HPS areas and identified exemplars of HPS as resource schools to form a strong network.

Research limitations/implications

HPS can be regarded as new paradigm of schooling rather than an add-on programme.

Practical implications

HPS can be regarded as new paradigm of schooling rather than an add-on programme. The advantage of an academic institution masterminding the development process lies with their strength in education and research, building on the professionalism of school educators in health promotion and developing evidence-based HPS practice.

Originality/value

This paper discusses an approach for addressing the key factors associated with initiation of innovation and management of change in an education setting. The involvement of both higher education and an award scheme can act strong catalysts to drive change, resulting in a strong evidence base with and results demonstrating effectiveness, which then led to government support.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

SDG3 – Good Health and Wellbeing: Re-Calibrating the SDG Agenda: Concise Guides to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-709-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Albert Lee, Kwong‐ka Tsang, Shiu‐hung Lee, Cho‐yee To and Ting‐fai Kwan

The development of a Health Promoting School concept in Hong Kong has faced many challenges, as in other countries. However, there is strong evidence from research…

Abstract

The development of a Health Promoting School concept in Hong Kong has faced many challenges, as in other countries. However, there is strong evidence from research findings that there is a need for this development to promote the health of young people effectively. Strategies are currently being developed in Hong Kong to address the key issues and challenges inherent in developing Health Promoting Schools. They include work on teacher training, funding and resources, policy making, the re‐orientation of the education system, participation by the community and parents, and the formation of healthy alliances. All these issues need to be addressed before a school‐based health promotion programme can be developed further. This paper describes current strategies being used by the authors of this paper to tackle these issues to develop a more comprehensive Health Promoting School programme in Hong Kong.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Abstract

Details

SDG3 – Good Health and Wellbeing: Re-Calibrating the SDG Agenda: Concise Guides to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-709-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Albert Lee, Fei‐lung Lau, Clarke B. Hazlett, Chak‐wah Kam, Patrick Wong, Tai‐wai Wong and Susan Chow

Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments are increasingly popular venues for primary care, causing a serious threat to healthcare quality. This paper reports the…

Abstract

Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments are increasingly popular venues for primary care, causing a serious threat to healthcare quality. This paper reports the development of a comprehensive research method for identifying primary care patients attending A&E. Patients were randomly selected from the four A&E departments across different time periods and different regions in Hong Kong. The definition of GP cases was based on a retrospective record review conducted by a panel of emergency physicians using the standard laid down by the Hong Kong College of Family Physicians. The patients sampled were similar in sex and age distribution to A&E attendees for the whole territory. The level of GP cases was found to be 57 per cent, with a significantly higher proportion of patients in the younger age group. The high level of use reflects the lack of a well co‐ordinated development of primary care services and interfacing with secondary care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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