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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Jennifer Brannon Barhorst, Alan Wilson, Graeme James McLean and Joshua Brooks

It has now become a normal part of the consumption journey for consumers to share their positive and negative service encounters with firms on microblogs such as Twitter…

Abstract

Purpose

It has now become a normal part of the consumption journey for consumers to share their positive and negative service encounters with firms on microblogs such as Twitter. There is, however, a limited amount of research on service encounter microblog word of mouth (SEMWOM) and its impact on firm reputation from a receiver’s perspective. This study aims to understand the comparative effects of positive and negative valence SEMWOM on receivers’ perceptions of firms’ reputations and the factors that are particularly salient to receivers’ perceptions of firm reputation upon exposure to SEMWOM.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment exposed 372 Twitter users to positive and negative valence SEMWOM. To determine whether changes in perception of firm reputation occurred on exposure to both positive and negative valence SEMWOM, participants’ perceptions of a range of US airlines were measured before and after exposure to the SEMWOM. To confirm the factors that influence the perception of reputation on such exposure, six structural equation models were created to determine the comparative effects of positive and negative valence SEMWOM among three electronic WOM media as follows: video, photo and text.

Findings

Both positive and negative valence SEMWOM affect receivers’ perceptions of airlines’ reputations on exposure. Furthermore, the factors that influence perceptions of reputation on exposure to SEMWOM vary depending on valence and type of media contained in a tweet.

Originality/value

Although consumers now routinely share their positive and negative service encounters with brands on microblogs, scant research has examined receivers of positive and negative valence SEMWOM, important actors in the microblog domain. This study addresses this research gap by empirically investigating the impact of both positive and negative valence SEMWOM on receivers’ perceptions of firm reputation upon exposure to it.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Graeme McLean, Kofi Osei-Frimpong, Alan Wilson and Valentina Pitardi

By adopting a social presence theory perspective, this study aims investigate the influence of perceived usefulness of live chat services and of their unique human…

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1342

Abstract

Purpose

By adopting a social presence theory perspective, this study aims investigate the influence of perceived usefulness of live chat services and of their unique human attributes on customer attitudes, beliefs and behaviours in the context of online travel shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a cross-sectional survey research involving 8 travel provider websites and 631 travel consumers, this work applies structural equation modelling to analyse the data.

Findings

The results illustrate that the perceived usefulness from the communication with a human live chat assistant positively influences customer attitudes and trust towards the website as well as increasing purchase intention. The findings further illustrate the role of the human social cues conveyed by live chat facilities, namely, human warmth, human assurance, human attentiveness and human customised content in positively moderating this effect.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to specific human attributes. Future research could investigate the role of other human characteristics as well as assess the ability of artificial intelligent powered chatbots in replicating the human elements outlined in this research.

Originality/value

The study provides a unique contribution to the travel literature by offering empirical insights and conceptual clarity into the usefulness of human operated live chat communication on travellers’ attitudes, trust towards the website and purchase intentions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Mirella Yani-de-Soriano, Paul H.P. Hanel, Rosario Vazquez-Carrasco, Jesús Cambra-Fierro, Alan Wilson and Edgar Centeno

The purpose of this paper is, first, to identify the relationship, if any, between customers’ perceptions of justice (functional element) and employee effort (symbolic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is, first, to identify the relationship, if any, between customers’ perceptions of justice (functional element) and employee effort (symbolic element) and their effects on satisfaction and loyalty in the context of service recovery and, second, to determine the impact of cross-cultural differences on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from actual customers were gathered in three countries (n = 414) and analyzed using structural equation modeling to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results demonstrate the role of the constructs of perceived employee effort and perceived justice in influencing post-recovery satisfaction and loyalty across cultures. While perceived justice is valued across cultures, customers from feminine (masculine) cultures require more (less) employee effort to influence post-recovery satisfaction positively. Customers from low (high) uncertainty cultures are more (less) willing to give the provider another chance after a service recovery.

Research limitations/implications

The study shows that both functional and symbolic elements of service recovery are important determinants of customer satisfaction and loyalty and that their influence can be significant in a cross-cultural context.

Practical implications

International service managers must consider the nature of cultural differences in their markets to develop and implement tailored recovery strategies that can result in satisfied customers.

Originality/value

This study is the first to integrate the functional and symbolic elements of service recovery, their impact on customers’ behavioral responses and the influence of cultural variations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Keith Pyper, Anne Marie Doherty, Spiros Gounaris and Alan Wilson

Drawing on Resource-based Theory, the purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the effect of International Strategic Brand Management (SBM) on export performance…

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1050

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on Resource-based Theory, the purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the effect of International Strategic Brand Management (SBM) on export performance within the Business-to-Business (B2B) context. To be able to purposely assess the relationship, this paper also sets out to discover what antecedent international resources, (financial resources) and international capabilities (market information, branding and marketing planning) contribute to the ability of B2B exporters to effectively manage their brands abroad.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method firm-level approach was employed. First, a qualitative study of 34 in-depth interviews explored the focal inter-relationships and constructs identified within the literature. A survey of 208 successful UK exporters was then conducted and the results were analysed using structured equation modelling.

Findings

The results confirm that certain marketing capabilities (branding and marketing planning) are advantageous antecedents to the employment of effective SBM in foreign markets which, in turn, leads to increased financial and market performance internationally.

Practical implications

This paper outlines practical brand management considerations managers need to account for to achieve effective exporting. Practitioners are advised to prioritise the development of robust international branding and marketing planning capabilities which can enable them to exploit their limited financial resources for optimal benefits. Furthermore, by developing these capabilities, firms can focus on the essence of their brand and communicate their brand image through the effective strategic management of their brand to business customers, evoking positive brand associations, enhanced perceived brand value and the achievement of increased export performance.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to focus on international SBM as the deterministic factor leading to improved B2B export performance. An innovative framework is offered which positions the pivotal role of International SBM as the central focus. The construct for international branding capabilities is extended specifically for use in the B2B domain.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

ANDREW HAYMAN and ALAN WILSON

Andrew Hayman, associate consultant with Davies & Robson Software and Alan Wilson, director — Cape Systems and Consulting Services, Europe and associate consultant with…

Abstract

Andrew Hayman, associate consultant with Davies & Robson Software and Alan Wilson, director — Cape Systems and Consulting Services, Europe and associate consultant with Davies & Robson demonstrate how the efficiency of packaging can have a major effect on the costs of the manufacturer and the client or end user. They discuss how new cost allocation techniques can reflect the true cost of handling a product through the logistics chain, particularly in respect of the impact that the cube of the product makes upon those costs. Whilst the article concentrates on direct product profitability in a fast moving consumer goods environment the principles and practice apply to any other industry.

Details

Logistics World, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-2137

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1963

IN April 1960 a Committee under the Chairmanship of Sir Alan Wilson, F.R.S., was appointed by the Government to examine the nature, sources and effects of the problem of…

Abstract

IN April 1960 a Committee under the Chairmanship of Sir Alan Wilson, F.R.S., was appointed by the Government to examine the nature, sources and effects of the problem of noise and to advise what further measures could be taken to mitigate it. That Committee has now completed its investigations and its findings have been published in the form of a Command Paper entitled ‘Noise—Final Report’. Approximately one quarter of the Report is devoted to aircraft noise and we have reproduced a condensed version of this section in the following pages.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1962

P.J.A. Group. Chairman of the newly‐reorganised Pinchin Johnson group is Sir Alan H. Wilson, chairman‐elect of Courtaulds. A former maths lecturer and researcher into…

Abstract

P.J.A. Group. Chairman of the newly‐reorganised Pinchin Johnson group is Sir Alan H. Wilson, chairman‐elect of Courtaulds. A former maths lecturer and researcher into metals and semiconductors, he switched during the war to radio communications and nuclear physics, and in 1945 joined the board of Courtaulds Ltd., who took over the P.J.A. group in 1960.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Manto Gotsi, Constantine Andriopoulos and Alan Wilson

This study seeks to empirically examine cultural alignment with new corporate brand values in the rebranding aftermath.

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5754

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to empirically examine cultural alignment with new corporate brand values in the rebranding aftermath.

Design/methodology/approach

Focuses on a case study of a firm that recently underwent a corporate rebranding campaign. Analysis is based on data collected through 14 in‐depth interviews with senior managers, and questionnaire data from an intranet survey with the firm's employees.

Findings

The empirical findings highlight that despite the firm's internal communication initiatives, current staff attitudes and behaviours are not aligned with the new corporate brand priorities. Resistance to change appears to play an important role in this respect. Yet, interestingly, some divisions view the current culture as more aligned to the new corporate brand than others. Moreover, staff that have joined the firm after the rebranding exercise view the current culture as more aligned to the new corporate brand values than those who have been with the firm since before the launch of the new corporate brand.

Research limitations/implications

A single case study but one which provides empirical insights that advance theoretical thinking in corporate re‐branding.

Practical implications

Managers should aim for organization‐wide buy‐in towards the new corporate brand values and address challenges involved in aligning subcultures with the requirements of the new corporate brand.

Originality/value

Very few papers have empirically studied the process of cultural alignment in corporate re‐branding. This paper is relevant to managers of organizations undertaking corporate re‐branding activities.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Kwabena Frimpong and Alan Wilson

This paper seeks to examine the relevance of some existing Western motivation and job design theories in explaining employees' service performance, termed service…

Downloads
1757

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the relevance of some existing Western motivation and job design theories in explaining employees' service performance, termed service orientation in delivery, in a developing country context.

Design/methodology/approach

The satisfaction‐performance thesis and the two factor theory (motivation and hygiene factors) are tested using a case study from a developing economy, Ghana. Survey data were collected from 535 retail bank employees of two large commercial banks across 85 branches in the final phase of the research. Multiple and hierarchical regression as well as split sample analyses were used to examine data.

Findings

Overall, the findings indicate some support for the validity and relevance of the satisfaction‐service performance thesis even in a non‐developed economy. Some outcomes, however, seem to challenge the validity of the two factor theory: context/hygiene satisfaction elements emerged as better predictors of service performance than content/motivator factors. In particular, context satisfaction dimension relating to co‐workers appeared to be the most important predictor. Satisfaction with pay and rewards, however, appeared unimportant to the service performance of the bank employees surveyed.

Research limitations/implications

As the research was limited to the banking sector from only one developing country, generalisations and applications of its findings should be made with caution. Future studies which provide broader conceptual and empirical views, in terms of how specific co‐worker attitudes and behaviours motivate or discourage service‐oriented performances in multi‐country studies, could be useful.

Practical implications

Despite its limitations, the confirmation of the satisfaction‐performance thesis in this paper may indicate to managers that some, if not all, of the management theories taught in American/European schools may be equally relevant to developing economies such as Ghana. In addition, the findings provide managers with insights regarding the potential importance of context satisfaction elements to employees' service performance.

Originality/value

Overall, the broad findings from the study indicate some support for the relevance of the satisfaction‐service performance thesis even in a non‐developed economy, characterised by relatively challenging economic conditions. However, some outcomes reported in this paper seem to challenge the validity of the two factor theory and its relevance for job motivation and design.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Khanyapuss Punjaisri, Heiner Evanschitzky and Alan Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to understand the internal branding process from the employees' perspective; it will empirically assess the relationship between internal…

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13310

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the internal branding process from the employees' perspective; it will empirically assess the relationship between internal branding and employees' delivery of the brand promise as well as the relationships among their brand identification, brand commitment and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

On a census basis, a quantitative survey is carried out with 699 customer‐interface employees from five major hotels.

Findings

Internal branding is found to have a positive impact on attitudinal and behavioural aspects of employees in their delivery of the brand promise. As employees' brand commitment does not have a statistically significant relationship with employees' brand performance, it is not regarded as a mediator in the link between internal branding and employees' brand performance. Furthermore, the study shows that brand identification is a driver of brand commitment, which precedes brand loyalty of employees.

Practical implications

A number of significant managerial implications are drawn from this study, for example using both internal communication and training to influence employees' brand‐supporting attitudes and behaviours. Still, it should be noted that the effect of internal branding on the behaviours could be dependent on the extent to which it could effectively influence their brand attitudes.

Originality/value

The results provide valuable insights from the key internal audience's perspectives into an internal branding process to ensure the delivery of the brand promise. It empirically shows the relationship between internal branding and the behavioural outcome as well as the meditational effects of employees' brand identification, commitment and loyalty.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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