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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Lynne Caley, Sharon J. Williams, Izabela Spernaes, David Thomas, Doris Behrens and Alan Willson

It has become accepted practice to include an evaluation alongside learning programmes that take place at work, as a means of judging their effectiveness. There is a…

Abstract

Purpose

It has become accepted practice to include an evaluation alongside learning programmes that take place at work, as a means of judging their effectiveness. There is a tendency to focus such evaluations on the relevance of the intervention and the amount of learning achieved by the individual. The aim of this review is to examine existing evaluation frameworks that have been used to evaluate education interventions and, in particular, assess how these have been used and the outcomes of such activity.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review using Arskey and O’Malley’s five stage framework was undertaken to examine existing evaluation frameworks claiming to evaluate education interventions.

Findings

Forty five articles were included in the review. A majority of papers concentrate on learner satisfaction and/or learning achieved. Rarely is a structured framework mentioned, or detail of the approach to analysis cited. Typically, evaluations lacked baseline data, control groups, longitudinal observations and contextual awareness.

Practical implications

This review has implications for those involved in designing and evaluating work-related education programmes, as it identifies areas where evaluations need to be strengthened and recommends how existing frameworks can be combined to improve how evaluations are conducted.

Originality/value

This scoping review is novel in its assessment and critique of evaluation frameworks employed to evaluate work-related education programmes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1964

THE re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The…

Abstract

THE re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The upheaval of staff, the loss of status for some senior officers, the general uncertainty for the future—these are very real consequences of the Act and they cannot be ignored. Many chief librarians will see the work of a lifetime, perhaps spent in building up a comprehensive and unified system, made virtually meaningless overnight.

Details

New Library World, vol. 66 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1964

The re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The…

Abstract

The re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The upheaval of staff, the loss of status for some senior officers, the general uncertainty for the future—these are very real consequences of the Act and they cannot be ignored. Many chief librarians will see the work of a lifetime, perhaps spent in building up a comprehensive and unified system, made virtually meaningless overnight.

Details

New Library World, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Although the subject discussed at this meeting is one in which I have a personal and commercial interest, I will try to report the meeting in an unbiased manner. I must…

Abstract

Although the subject discussed at this meeting is one in which I have a personal and commercial interest, I will try to report the meeting in an unbiased manner. I must, however, point out that I asked only one question at the meeting and that was when one of the speakers compared solder cream to sand. I believe this type of comment shows a complete misunderstanding of the sophisticated material that is today's solder cream and especially of solder cream designed for ‘fine‐pitch soldering’.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

A.C. Chilton

This February meeting began in somewhat dramatic fashion—not with the actor's usual injunction to ’break a leg‘ but with the Chairman's announcement that Stuart Briggs…

Abstract

This February meeting began in somewhat dramatic fashion—not with the actor's usual injunction to ’break a leg‘ but with the Chairman's announcement that Stuart Briggs, the fourth of the seven presenters, had broken an ankle. It subsequently transpired that he had evidently ’only‘ torn the ligaments, but his presence at the seminar was sorely missed and I know all will wish him a speedy recovery.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Since its early conception, the group has grown from a handful of enthusiastic engineers to the largest trade association in Europe, if not the world, for Surface Mount…

Abstract

Since its early conception, the group has grown from a handful of enthusiastic engineers to the largest trade association in Europe, if not the world, for Surface Mount. As in previous years, SMART will be arranging Seminars, Hands‐on Workshops and Open Forums, giving valuable knowledge for those just entering or those already experienced in SMT. Open forums allow the opportunity for the exchange of information on a variety of different topics, building experience in the technology which would otherwise be unobtainable.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Christine Gallagher, David McMenemy and Alan Poulter

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the language utilised in Acceptable Use Policies (AUP) in Scottish public libraries. Through this examination the paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the language utilised in Acceptable Use Policies (AUP) in Scottish public libraries. Through this examination the paper aims to ascertain if power relationships between local authorities, public libraries and users are apparent. Finally, the paper aims to determine if Foucault’s theory of panopticism is relevant to public libraries in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses all 32 of the AUPs used in Scottish public libraries, applying a Foucaldian discourse analysis to the content of the policies.

Findings

By thorough examination of the literature the researchers were able to extract ten key features that ought to appear in an AUP. It was found that only one of 32 local authorities included information relating to all of these features. It was also found that one local authority contained as few as four of these key features. The median number of features included in the policies was seven. It was also found that power relationships are evident and can be perceived throughout the AUPs. By identifying the key Foucauldian themes of discipline, surveillance, knowledge, and power and resistance throughout the AUPs, the researchers were able to analyse and identify the existence of power relationships and consider the implications these could have on users and on the library services being provided.

Research limitations/implications

The study examines one geographic region, and is only indicative of the region concerned. In addition the usage of the qualitative methodology utilised could be deemed to have elements of subjectivity.

Practical implications

The study would be of benefit to researchers and professionals interested in issues around AUPs and surveillance of library users.

Originality/value

The use of Foucaldian discourse analysis is limited in library and information science research, and this study helps fill this gap. It is the first study the researchers have found that critically examines a range of public library AUPs.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 71 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

In the matter of food purity and control Hospital Catering Services have been outside the law, a privileged position where the general law of food and drugs have never…

Abstract

In the matter of food purity and control Hospital Catering Services have been outside the law, a privileged position where the general law of food and drugs have never applied and the modern regulatory control in food hygiene has similarly not applied. In the eyes of the general public hospital catering standards have always been high above the general run of food preparation. As the NHS continued, complaints began gradually to seep out of the closed community, of dirt in the kitchens and prevalent hygiene malpractices. The general standard for most hospitals remained high but there were no means of dealing with the small minority of complaints which disgusted patients and non‐cater‐ing staff, such as insect and rodent infestations, and an increase in the frequency of food poisoning outbreaks.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 88 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Chikako Takeshita

I begin my historical analysis of the co-evolution of reproductive norms and desires, approaches to fertility control, and the meaning assigned to contraceptives with an…

Abstract

I begin my historical analysis of the co-evolution of reproductive norms and desires, approaches to fertility control, and the meaning assigned to contraceptives with an examination of the Grafenberg Ring, the first modern IUD. The Grafenberg ring, developed in the late 1920s by a German doctor, Ernst Gräfenberg, was a small ring made of silkworm gut and coiled silver that can be compressed to be inserted into the uterus. The Grafenberg ring appeared at a time when changes in social attitude towards sexuality had formed a favorable climate for a new contraceptive method. The device was greeted with much interest from the European birth control movement, and Gräfenberg was invited to speak at the Third Congress of the World League for Sexual Reform held in London in 1929 and at the Seventh International Birth Control Conference in Zurich in 1930 (Davis, 1971).

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Reproduction and Sexuality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-088-3

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