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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Alan Slater

Ambulance service trusts in England have historically had little or no competition for non-emergency patient transport services (NEPTS), but following the imposition of…

Abstract

Purpose

Ambulance service trusts in England have historically had little or no competition for non-emergency patient transport services (NEPTS), but following the imposition of the NHS Procurement, Patient Choice and Competition (PPCC) Regulation (Number 2) 2013, NHS commissioners could accept suitable bids for NEPTS work from third-party commercial competition. This paper describes how NEPTS evolved in England and how an Ambulance Service Trust Board had to step-up their approach to bidding for NHS NEPTS work and to protect their brand and financial position in a competitive commercial market place.

Design/methodology/approach

The Trust Board developed a competitive bidding strategy with a market research project using “grounded theory” to identify and categorise stakeholders' issues followed by re-engineering to achieve new operational goals. A fundamental element of the bid was an opportunity to share patient information between local NHS facilities using a common access data warehouse. This would represent a serious barrier to entry to any third-party non-NHS commercial competitor.

Findings

Key projects were identified in the bidding process, including relocation of NEPTS resource bases, use of third-party resources and the establishment of a local NHS-wide data warehouse. They were all self-financing within the contract period and accepted by the commissioners. However, the establishment of NEPTS hubs at hospitals with clinics scattered throughout their grounds was rejected by the commissioners due to incompatibility with existing hospital practices.

Originality/value

This case study defines the challenges and opportunities faced by an English Ambulance Service Trust Board when responding to an invitation to tender (ITT) from NHS commissioners for NEPTS and competing with third-parties on a commercial basis. Any emergency service would face similar challenges bidding for work in a competitive environment.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Alan Earl‐Slater

Looks at evidence of the fate of medical research and provides a template for gauging the value of money spent. Provides key issues and learning points which need…

Abstract

Looks at evidence of the fate of medical research and provides a template for gauging the value of money spent. Provides key issues and learning points which need consideration in order to improve research skills and capabilities. Offers evidence that could be used to improve research governance in health care. Gives learning points for those sponsoring, hosting or managing research and for others becoming involved in research. Concludes that understanding past practices should help in improving those which are current.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Alan Earl‐Slater

Looks at where action research has been used in health care in the UK and suggests lessons can be learned by looking at action research taking place in other fields, such…

Abstract

Looks at where action research has been used in health care in the UK and suggests lessons can be learned by looking at action research taking place in other fields, such as education, policing and social services.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Alan Earl‐Slater

Increasing attention is being placed on clinical trials as a source of evidence. Presents thoughts about the advantages and disadvantages of clinical trials and their…

Abstract

Increasing attention is being placed on clinical trials as a source of evidence. Presents thoughts about the advantages and disadvantages of clinical trials and their influence on thinking and clinical practice.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Alan Earl‐Slater

First in a series of articles to address the critical appraisal of clinical trials. Provides background of knowledge, ideas and instruments to use to understand better the…

Abstract

First in a series of articles to address the critical appraisal of clinical trials. Provides background of knowledge, ideas and instruments to use to understand better the evidence, and tools used in looking at evidence. Provides a rationale for critical appraisal and three different hierarchies of the evidence.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Alan Earl Slater

Examines a particular system for reporting clinical trials: the revised CONSORT system. Identifies its evolution and key components, indicating who may go on to use it…

Abstract

Examines a particular system for reporting clinical trials: the revised CONSORT system. Identifies its evolution and key components, indicating who may go on to use it, posting its key strengths, and concludes by identifying its outstanding limitations.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Alan Earl‐Slater

The pharmaceutical business has long been a source of controversy, particularly the ability to market a drug for human consumption. The thalidomide disaster of the late…

Abstract

The pharmaceutical business has long been a source of controversy, particularly the ability to market a drug for human consumption. The thalidomide disaster of the late 1950s and early 1960s invoked all nations in the 15 member states of the EU to require that a pharmaceutical product intended for human consumption have an official market licence before it is allowed onto the nation’s market. Until December 1994 each nation in the EU could decide itself what products came onto its market. From January 1995 the European Commission, facilitated by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency, has had the power to decide on applications for pan‐EU market licences. Explores the new EU licensing system, drawing from past and present experience, and argues that although complex at least four sets of motivations lie behind the construction of the EMEA system: the EU prisoners’ dilemma; four types of market failures; extensions of politico‐bureaucratic business and, finally, the inability of the pharmaceutical industry to nurture effectively any feasible alternative to the new system.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 96 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

ALAN SLATER

For decades distribution has been like a ‘sleeping giant’, content to carry on as in the past. Now it has received an awakening triggered by the information technology…

Abstract

For decades distribution has been like a ‘sleeping giant’, content to carry on as in the past. Now it has received an awakening triggered by the information technology revolution. The result has been reduced costs and improved customer service. Alan Slater, managing consultant at Price Waterhouse discusses the importance of distribution information.

Details

Logistics World, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-2137

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Alan Earl‐Slater

This paper identifies and explores issues of medication, the elderly, and the problems in securing and using evidence from randomised control trials. Demographic and…

Abstract

This paper identifies and explores issues of medication, the elderly, and the problems in securing and using evidence from randomised control trials. Demographic and health care data are presented. While the elderly are a significant set of consumers of medicines, there is a lack of published evidence, in control trial format, on which medications are better for elderly patients. Even if all the trial evidence on a new drug was published before the drug was put on the market, as recently recommended, there are serious issues to consider in securing and using evidence from clinical trials. This paper indicates ten problems in securing and using evidence from randomised control trials. Three examples of randomised control trials involving the elderly are given. While it is easier to call for improvements in the evidence base than to achieve improvements, this paper argues that improvements are fundamentally necessary. This is because if no significant improvement comes through on the evidence base, we will never know if we are providing the elderly with the cost‐effective care and attention that they deserve.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Alan Slater

The rapidly increasing demands on the logistics activity makeinformation systems the key variable in satisfying customer andcorporate requirements. Current systems are…

Abstract

The rapidly increasing demands on the logistics activity make information systems the key variable in satisfying customer and corporate requirements. Current systems are probably out of date and unable to cope with current levels of use and demand. Presents criteria and a process for selection of information systems based on three approaches: package solutions; tailored package solutions and totally bespoke solutions.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

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