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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Sandra Gallagher and Alan Sixsmith

This paper aims to report on the efforts made to enhance the engagement of IT students with non-IT-specific content. The mechanism to foster this engagement was the introduction…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the efforts made to enhance the engagement of IT students with non-IT-specific content. The mechanism to foster this engagement was the introduction of an eLearning information system (ELIS) for a finance-related subject within an IT undergraduate degree at the university. The subject developers were primarily concerned with both the learning design and the engagement of the student to enable the effective incorporation of an ELIS into the classroom.

Design/methodology/approach

This interpretive research used a comparative case study as the aim was to gain an in-depth understanding of a particular situation. The research approach also allows an open-minded interpretation of the collected data as the researcher is interested in looking for the “Why and not the How”. Data were collected via an online university student feedback survey.

Findings

Four key themes emerged from the data as follows: IT students learning non-IT-related content was a major driving force behind the changes to the course; staff change brought fresh eyes to the subject content and enabled improvements to occur; introducing the ELIS assisted the teaching staff to reduce preparation time while also helping students learn at the own pace; and collaborative group work helped facilitated student insights into real life work scenarios. The findings show that each of the key themes identified played a role in improving student engagement and satisfaction with the non-IT subject matter.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is from its practical perspective. Engaging IT students in non-IT subject matter is a challenging proposition for which there is no simple solution. This paper shows that over a five-semester period and through a phased implementation of major changes, student satisfaction and engagement with non-IT subject matter has improved steadily. This paper is of interest, and hence value, to academics who encounter problems or issues of engaging students in non-domain-related subject matter.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2010

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Alan W. Scott

This paper seeks to review guidance on the undertaking of quinquennial surveys of Church of England parish churches, then to examine the approaches of Diocese Advisory Committees…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review guidance on the undertaking of quinquennial surveys of Church of England parish churches, then to examine the approaches of Diocese Advisory Committees in administrating the surveys and finally to apply that guidance to a case study within one of the researched Dioceses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews current guidelines on undertaking quinquennial surveys of English parish churches, examining the methodology of both the inspection and reporting techniques of the survey. The paper also reports on a series of interviews carried out with Dioceses' Secretaries in Northern England who are responsible for administrating quinquennial surveys, and finally examines the application of national and diocesan guidelines by reporting on a quinquennial survey of St Olaf's Church in Wasdale, Cumbria, England's smallest church.

Findings

The principal guidance for quinquennial inspection of Churches is produced by the Council for the Care of Churches but this is currently out of print. Perhaps for this reason various Diocese Advisory Committees have produced their own guidance. It is possible that more standardisation in the format of reports is required as this will enable Dioceses to correlate electronic information in the production of their maintenance strategies. The alternative view is that to produce a standard pro‐forma does not do justice to an individual building which may have evolved over 1,000 years and requires specific advice. The 1991 Care of Churches and Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction Measures extended the professional adviser capable of undertaking the survey from just Architect to Architects and Chartered Building Surveyor. But within the three Dioceses reviewed this has a limited impact with Architects being dominant by a ratio of 25:1.

Originality/value

To survey and report on buildings of such historic and community importance is a privilege and the pinnacle of conservation expertise. It is hoped that the guidance in this paper may stimulate interest in the surveying of churches by younger surveyors.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Ruth Garland

Labour came to power in 1997 and immediately transferred many features of its party political news management style into government, overseeing the departure of most of the civil…

Abstract

Purpose

Labour came to power in 1997 and immediately transferred many features of its party political news management style into government, overseeing the departure of most of the civil service communications leadership within two years, and developing the media management role of politically appointed special advisers. The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the changes in custom and practice that operated behind the scenes in government communications between 1997 and 2015, asking to what extent such changes challenge public trust in government in a liberal democracy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a longitudinal, qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with former civil servants, journalists and special advisers, together with documentary and archival evidence. The data were analysed thematically through the text-processing software, NVivo.

Findings

The paper finds that although the controversy over the 2002 dossier on Iraq’s Weapons of Mass Destruction was an extraordinary episode, the creative approach to news management that characterised this case still operates within UK Government communications: the bypassing of civil servants, a partial approach to the facts, selective briefing of favoured journalists, a lack of due process in the management of information and a disregard for the letter and spirit of propriety codes. This has implications for public trust and confidence in the workings of liberal democracy.

Originality/value

The study adopts a mediatisation approach to the study of public relations, using the concept of the “cross field” to demonstrate how PR professionals share media management responsibilities with a number of different promotional actors. PR professionals in government must therefore navigate between the hidden, competitive and demanding worlds of politics, the media and bureaucracy, working with journalists, politicians and political operatives to craft the narratives that seek to drive public opinion.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Dimitra Dritsa and Nimish Biloria

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of emerging technologies in the promotion of health and well-being at the urban, domestic and bodily scale, through the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of emerging technologies in the promotion of health and well-being at the urban, domestic and bodily scale, through the systematic examination of technologies such as physical sensing systems and physiological data monitoring, that are currently explored as drivers for achieving sustainable healthcare within a multi-scalar approach.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive study of the various technologies associated with smart healthcare is provided, first investigating smart cities, physical sensing systems and geospatial data as potential enablers of public health. Then the discourse shifts towards exploring Smart Home technologies for healthcare, first reviewing strategies of enhancing the home environment with multisensory components, and then discussing the emergence of physiological monitoring devices and their interconnection with the domestic and urban environment.

Findings

While the implementation of Internet of Things, physical sensing systems and geospatial analytics in extracting and analyzing the multiple information layers of the urban, the domestic and the bodily environment, has been widely explored, there is little consideration on the transition from the domestic to the urban level, and while within each of the different scales, the need for a multi-componential approach is addressed, there is minimal effort towards its materialization.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this study therefore lies in laying the ground for further research towards a multi-scalar relational approach that views smart healthcare as a trajectory, binding the bodily, to the domestic and the urban fabric.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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