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1 – 7 of 7
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Ilene F. Rockman, Virginia Massey‐Burzio, Alan Ritch, Steven D. Zink and Martha L. Hale

Economist John Kenneth Galbraith was once quoted as saying, “There are two types of economists—those who don't know the future, and those who don't know they don't know.”…

Abstract

Economist John Kenneth Galbraith was once quoted as saying, “There are two types of economists—those who don't know the future, and those who don't know they don't know.” The same can be said for librarians.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

John Kupersmith

Rapid technological change has become a fact of life in the libraries of the 1990s. While this change touches all parts of the library organization, nowhere is it more…

Abstract

Rapid technological change has become a fact of life in the libraries of the 1990s. While this change touches all parts of the library organization, nowhere is it more visible, or are its effects more keenly felt, than in reference departments. Consider these “snapshots”—fictional, but real enough:

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Susan J. Barnes

The Albert R. Mann Library at Cornell University has created a working electronic library and has made significant changes in services and staff responsibilities to…

Abstract

The Albert R. Mann Library at Cornell University has created a working electronic library and has made significant changes in services and staff responsibilities to address users' evolving needs. This article presents an overview of these changes, after discussing the development of electronic libraries at Mann and elsewhere. The increased usage that Mann's collections have received as the electronic library has been developed is also described.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Elaine L. Ritch and Julie McColl

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:How sustainability messages have diffused into mainstream discourse?The role of…

Abstract

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

How sustainability messages have diffused into mainstream discourse?

The role of behavioural economics, specifically nudge theory, in encouraging sustainable behaviours.

The visual elements in marketing that support nudge theory.

How businesses are aligning with consumer concern for sustainability to illustrate their ‘wokeness’ to social issues.

Details

New Perspectives on Critical Marketing and Consumer Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-554-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Chen Guo

Outlines Heath, Jarrow and Morton’s (1992) method (MJM) for modelling interest rates and refers to other research showing that although it is generally non‐Markov, this…

Abstract

Outlines Heath, Jarrow and Morton’s (1992) method (MJM) for modelling interest rates and refers to other research showing that although it is generally non‐Markov, this can be modified if the volatility structure depends on relative maturity term rather than calendar maturity date. Develops a re‐indexed MJM model, applies it to 1975‐1991 data on non‐callable US treasury bills, notes and bonds; and compares its goodness of fit with Jordan (1984). Finds the forward function consistent with constant parameters, that state variables can be identified from the cross‐section estimates and that they have zero mean first differences when analysed through time series. Concludes that the forward function follows a martingale and promises further research.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 24 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2018

Robert Crawford and Matthew Bailey

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of oral history for marketing historians and provide case studies from projects in the Australian context to demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of oral history for marketing historians and provide case studies from projects in the Australian context to demonstrate its utility. These case studies are framed within a theme of market research and its historical development in two industries: advertising and retail property.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines oral histories from two marketing history projects. The first, a study of the advertising industry, examines the globalisation of the advertising agency in Australia over the period spanning the 1950s to the 1980s, through 120 interviews. The second, a history of the retail property industry in Australia, included 25 interviews with executives from Australia’s largest retail property firms whose careers spanned from the mid-1960s through to the present day.

Findings

The research demonstrates that oral histories provide a valuable entry port through which histories of marketing, shifts in approaches to market research and changing attitudes within industries can be examined. Interviews provided insights into firm culture and practices; demonstrated the variability of individual approaches within firms and across industries; created a record of the ways that market research has been conducted over time; and revealed the ways that some experienced operators continued to rely on traditional practices despite technological advances in research methods.

Originality/value

Despite their ubiquity, both the advertising and retail property industries in Australia have received limited scholarly attention. Recent scholarship is redressing this gap, but more needs to be understood about the inner workings of firms in an historical context. Oral histories provide an avenue for developing such understandings. The paper also contributes to broader debates about the role of oral history in business and marketing history.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Daniel S. Mason

Sports leagues and media providers are constantly seeking new ways of improving the consumption experience of viewers. Several new technologies have arrived in the…

Abstract

Sports leagues and media providers are constantly seeking new ways of improving the consumption experience of viewers. Several new technologies have arrived in the industry, but many have not proved financially viable. Among these new technologies is tracking technology, used to augment television coverage and for coaching enhancement. This has had mixed results. In this paper I argue that the emergence of Moneyball management practices in sport have created the supervening necessity (Winston, 1998) required to drive demand for player tracking technology in ice hockey. This technology is able to collect the data necessary to implement statistical analyses comparable to those used in professional baseball to cover media enhancement, coaching enhancement and Moneyball management.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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