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Article

Brian Griffin, Mike Harkin, Alan Day, Alan Duckworth, David Reid and Michael Wills

MY VOTE for the Most Depressing Spectacle of the Month goes to a shelf of leather‐bound, gold‐tooled ‘video classics’ seen in my local video rentals shop. The leather…

Abstract

MY VOTE for the Most Depressing Spectacle of the Month goes to a shelf of leather‐bound, gold‐tooled ‘video classics’ seen in my local video rentals shop. The leather binding and gold lettering looked quite impressive until you touched one of the volumes—Wuthering heights, for example—and realised that this ‘book’ was plastic, every single molecule of it. And empty, unless you counted the video tape.

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New Library World, vol. 83 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Alan S. Reid

This article discusses the development of Radio Frequency Identification technology and its legal implications. The technology promises to transform the supply chain…

Abstract

This article discusses the development of Radio Frequency Identification technology and its legal implications. The technology promises to transform the supply chain, through increased efficiency, stocktaking accuracy and ultimately lower costs for consumers. RFID technology creates a variety of potential legal concerns. In particular, RFID tags have the potential to seriously undermine the human right to privacy. RFID tags are privacy neutral, in that they neither destroy privacy nor promote privacy. However, RFID tags may greatly facilitate the surreptitious collection of personal data. The privacy of consumers of RFID enabled products may be violated which will seriously undermine consumer confidence in the trustworthiness of commercial organisations. Within the European Union, RFID technology may facilitate actions designed to undermine the Internal Market. RFID technology is in its infancy, however, the speed of technological development in this area will require a range of legislative and non‐legislative responses in the near future. Solutions to the privacy problem must be holistic, and encompass responses from a range of stakeholders. Firstly, at the design stage, RFlD technology must be privacy promoting. Thereafter, utilisation of RFID technology must be accompanied by the adoption of privacy protecting legislation, voluntary self and coregulation, codes of conduct and technological tools.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

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Article

Neil Cranston, Bill Mulford, Jack Keating and Alan Reid

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a national survey of government primary school principals in Australia, investigating the purposes of education, in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a national survey of government primary school principals in Australia, investigating the purposes of education, in terms of the importance and level of enactment of those purposes in schools.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2009, an electronic survey was distributed to government primary school principals in Australia seeking their views on the purposes of education. The survey comprised 71 items of a closed format and three items of an open‐ended format. Respondents rated first the importance they ascribed to particular purposes of education, then second the degree to which they believed these purposes were actually enacted in their particular school. Factor analyses were conducted on the item responses. Differences between importance and enactment of purposes are discussed together with reasons for these differences.

Findings

The findings overwhelmingly point to tensions between what they, the principals, believe ought to be the purposes of education and what the strategies to achieve those purposes might be, and the realities of what is actually happening. It could be argued that the results indicate a major shift away from public purposes of education to those more aligned with private purposes. Many of the barriers to achieving a greater focus in schools on public purposes are seen to be related to external (to the school) issues, such as government policy decisions, differential funding and resourcing across school sectors and emerging community and societal factors.

Research limitations/implications

This research complements other aspects of this project into the purposes of education in Australia. There are some limitations to the reported findings in so far as only government principals participated in the survey. Non‐government school principals were invited but declined to participate.

Originality/value

This is the only piece of research of its kind in Australia and provides unique insights – those of principals – into what schools are focusing on and what the leaders think they ought to be focusing on. There are clearly policy and practice implications of the research.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article

Wilfrid Snape, Ruth Thompson, Alan Duckworth, David Reid and Wilfred Ashworth

IN LESS than sixteen years time—on June 30 1997 to be precise—the lease on Kowloon beyond Boundary Street, and on the New Territories, will, according to British Law…

Abstract

IN LESS than sixteen years time—on June 30 1997 to be precise—the lease on Kowloon beyond Boundary Street, and on the New Territories, will, according to British Law, expire. Naturally Hong Kong is concerned as the Peking Lease nears its end. Writing in the Daily telegraph on September 28 1981 Graham Earnshaw commented that China ‘obviously wants to keep Hong Kong as it is for at least the immediate future because of its immense economic value, and that is the main thread of hope that Hong Kong people keep returning to when discussing the future’. Kevin Rafferty concluded a lead article ‘The first city in Asia’ in the Financial times special supplement on Hong Kong (June 15 1981)—‘China and Hong Kong are two different worlds and it will take a lot of effort and patience to bring them together’. David Bonavia writing in the Times on October 3 1981 sees in China's recent ‘seemingly generous offer to Taiwan of easy terms for a political reunion’, ‘the true way to a possible solution for the eventual re‐absorption of Hong Kong into the People's Republic’.

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New Library World, vol. 83 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Roman Iwaschkin, David Reid, Alan Day, Jim Francis and Stuart Hannabuss

FOR MOST of us, public library history usually amounts to scarcely more than rapidly dimming recollections of a handful of acts and commissions; dry facts memorised during…

Abstract

FOR MOST of us, public library history usually amounts to scarcely more than rapidly dimming recollections of a handful of acts and commissions; dry facts memorised during library school lectures and retained just long enough to put the exams behind us. Of course, we remember the great names— Carnegie, Dewey, McColvin, and perhaps a few others—but apart from retiring old‐timers' regular assurances that it was all so much better and worse back then, we tend to know little of the day‐to‐day routines of our predecessors.

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New Library World, vol. 83 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

GWW Young, B Hawkins, B Kelley, E Mee, P Scott, Mike Cornford, Alan Day and David Reid

PROVIDING PRACTICAL work for student librarians is now an accepted part of library work. We undertake it because of a sense of responsibility to the profession, but there…

Abstract

PROVIDING PRACTICAL work for student librarians is now an accepted part of library work. We undertake it because of a sense of responsibility to the profession, but there seems to have been little research into the question whether libraries gain or lose by accepting students for periods of practical work, looking at the question selfishly and without regard to the important issues involved.

Details

New Library World, vol. 80 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Neil Cranston, Megan Kimber, Bill Mulford, Alan Reid and Jack Keating

The paper aims to argue that there has been a privileging of the private (social mobility) and economic (social efficiency) purposes of schooling at the expense of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to argue that there has been a privileging of the private (social mobility) and economic (social efficiency) purposes of schooling at the expense of the public (democratic equality) purposes of schooling.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a literature review, policy and document analysis.

Findings

Since the late 1980s, the schooling agenda in Australia has been narrowed to one that gives primacy to purposes of schooling that highlight economic orientations (social efficiency) and private purposes (social mobility).

Practical implications

The findings have wider relevance beyond Australia, as similar policy agendas are evident in many other countries raising the question as to how the shift in purposes of education in those countries might mirror those in Australia.

Originality/value

While earlier writers have examined schooling policies in Australia and noted the implications of managerialism in relation to these policies, no study has analysed these policies from the perspective of the purposes of schooling. Conceptualising schooling, and its purposes in particular, in this way refocuses attention on how societies use their educational systems to promote (or otherwise) the public good.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Book part

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

Details

Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

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Article

Dilek Düştegör, Mariam A. Elhussein, Amani Alghamdi and Naya Nagy

This study aims to investigate how a very particular learning environment, namely, partition rooms, affect students’ teaching experience and further explore if students…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how a very particular learning environment, namely, partition rooms, affect students’ teaching experience and further explore if students’ learning styles is a pertinent determinant. Partition rooms are very common in Saudi Arabia when lectures are held by male instructors for female students. The male instructor delivers his lesson behind a glass wall, creating an environment of limited visual and auditory interaction. Various digital tools are present, meant to overcome the gap caused by the lack of direct student–teacher contact.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers collected data from a sample of 109 female students who are studying at Level 4 Computer Science Department, College of Computer Sciences and Information Technology, at a public university in Saudi Arabia. All of them experienced a minimum of two courses undertaken in a partition room. The survey consists of two parts with a total of 53 questions. The first 20 questions were adopted from the perceptual learning style preference questionnaire (PLSP).

Findings

Research findings reveal that students are affected differently by the various dimensions of the partition room depending on their learning style.

Originality/value

There are fewer results in the literature that study learners of our particular group, namely, Saudi females. The study focuses on students studying IT and related fields. This study is almost unique, as most studies of the kind are related to the experience of females learning English as a foreign language. Therefore, the authors’ research gives much-needed insight into the conditions and perceptions of female students studying toward their degree in a technical field.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article

BOOKS and Libraries for the Blind form the subject of a paper by Dr. Robert C. Moon in the May Library Journal. The writer is the son of William Moon, the inventor of the…

Abstract

BOOKS and Libraries for the Blind form the subject of a paper by Dr. Robert C. Moon in the May Library Journal. The writer is the son of William Moon, the inventor of the system of embossed writing bearing his name. He describes the systems of writing for the blind in use, and the various agencies for circulating literature. After examining the existing departments for the blind in Public Libraries, he comes to the conclusion that “all the libraries need more books, and if they are to reach and teach the adult blind they must have a fair proportion of them in the Moon type. All Public Libraries should possess a few works printed in the various types, care being taken to have a good supply of those embossed in the special type which is taught in the schools for the blind of the immediate locality, in order that the pupils in vacation time, and the graduates of the schools may be provided with reading matter, but the infirm and aged blind will be found in almost all communities, and for them books printed in the Moon type are indispensable. Alice S. Tyler describes the League of Library Commissions. “The success of the experiment in co‐operation which was inaugurated in 1901 by the library commissions of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa, whereby printed matter of common interest and equal necessity and value to these commissions was issued jointly, led to the suggestion that a national organization might more economically carry forward these and other lines of co‐operative work, leaving to the overcrowded state commission workers more time and money for the peculiar problems of each state.” This suggestion was brought up at the St. Louis conference, and resulted in an organization being formed under the title of the League of Library Commissions, consisting of one representative from each of the commissions included. The particular directions in which the League will promote co‐operative work are: carefully prepared lists of books for first purchase for small libraries; lists of new books which, upon examination, had been found desirable ; handbook of suggestions and direction as to the organization and management of small libraries; printed statement regarding the aims and methods of state library commissions, with comparison of their laws; definite help and suggestions on the subject of library buildings, especially floor‐plans arranged for economic administration, growing out of the experience of the library commissions in connection with the erection of Carnegie and other library buildings within the last few years; united effort to bring to the attention of book publishers the urgent need of good, durable binding, adequate indexing, &c.

Details

New Library World, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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