Search results

1 – 10 of 532
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Alan Murray and Rosa Palladino

The main objective of this exploratory study is to analyze the range of human capitals necessary for the modern entrepreneur and the nature of the barriers to effectively…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this exploratory study is to analyze the range of human capitals necessary for the modern entrepreneur and the nature of the barriers to effectively support the development of these capitals. Human capital is one of the three dimensions of intellectual capital and this document examines the role of education and training for entrepreneurial success.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a broad review of the main contributions to research and practice in the field of intellectual capital and entrepreneurship issues, we conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews on a sample of 10 professionals expert in business support. They represent a cross section of the main corporate agencies in Scotland. In addition, an interview guide was used to ensure that some questions, or “key questions”, were asked to all participants, also allowing for the flexibility to obtain updated information.

Findings

The interviews identified 21 key human capitals needed by today's entrepreneurs. However, the study also identifies the existence of obstacles to providing effective support for the development of human capital in the entrepreneur in terms of attention, process and resources.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations–The study is based on data collected by a sample of 10 professionals, according to a qualitative approach that focuses on a specific social field and therefore the results cannot be immediately generalized to other fields.

Practical implications

Practical implications–The study identifies the key human capital needed to run a successful company, directing the professional to direct support interventions more effectively in order to increase productivity and improve success rates for its customers.

Social implications

The value the long-term benefits of even a marginal increase in the efficiency of enterprise support to business through targeted entrepreneurial learning cannot be overstated.

Originality/value

There is a lack of empirical data linking the development of human capital and entrepreneurship. This work has resonance for providers of enterprise support seeking to remain relevant to the entrepreneurial development needs of the entrepreneur.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Antonio Usai, Veronica Scuotto, Alan Murray, Fabio Fiano and Luca Dezi

Entrepreneurial knowledge spurs innovation and, in turn, generates a competitive advantage. This paper aims to explore if entrepreneurial knowledge combined with the…

Downloads
1294

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial knowledge spurs innovation and, in turn, generates a competitive advantage. This paper aims to explore if entrepreneurial knowledge combined with the attitude to innovate can overcome the key “imperfections” of the innovation process generated by dynamic, current technological progress in the knowledge-intensive sector. The “imperfections” identified in risk management, asymmetric information in the knowledge management process and hold-up problems can all disrupt collaborative partnerships and limit opportunities for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A theory-building approach is applied which offers a case study analysis of two small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). These two SMEs operate in Europe but in two different territories: the UK and Italy. The study explores three key imperfections, risk management, asymmetric information in the knowledge management process and hold-up problems, which occur in the innovation process.

Findings

The entrepreneurs face these imperfections by adopting an open innovation model. Notwithstanding, both entrepreneurs had to deal with all “imperfections”, and their skills, attributes, attitude and aptitude allowed them to grow their business and continually develop new products. Therefore, the imperfections do not limit the innovative capacity of an entrepreneur but rather enhance their challengeable attitude. In this regard, the case studies induce a further analysis on entrepreneurial knowledge intertwined with entrepreneurial risk management and networking skills.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical significance of the two cases does not allow theorisation. However, this research offers interesting results which can be strengthened by a comparative case study with other countries or deeper investigation by applying a quantitative approach.

Originality/value

By leveraging entrepreneurial knowledge, the imperfections noted in the innovation process can be overcome. Entrepreneurial knowledge is recognised as the main asset of an enterprise if it is combined with external talent or human resources. Entrepreneurs aim to develop innovative approaches and ideas through establishing both formal and informal collaborative partnership relationships which are used thanks to the entrepreneurs’ networking skills, knowledge and abilities.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Alan Murray and Robert James Crammond

This paper analyses the transition of university students from initial perceptions of enterprise to potentially heightened levels of proclivity towards creative behaviours…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyses the transition of university students from initial perceptions of enterprise to potentially heightened levels of proclivity towards creative behaviours and future entrepreneurial activity.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a positivist approach, an intention-based scorecard survey targeted to two cohorts totalling 75 undergraduate students leading to 150 responses at a Scottish university. These were circulated at start and end sessions of four relevant courses, to establish a measure for self-evaluation with respect to perception and proclivity.

Findings

The data gathered from the Entrepreneurial Scorecard emphasised differences in perception and proclivity between the two cohorts, namely creativity, risk-taking, leadership and business aspiration. This re-emphasised the three identified themes: awareness through trait identification; autonomy through developing enterprising skills; and achievement through practicing entrepreneurial activities. This formed the basis for our novel model in supporting the entrepreneurial development of students: The Perception to Proclivity Process Model.

Research limitations/implications

This study focusses on a single case and further research within other institutions and domains is encouraged to contextually test the transferability of the two key outputs: the Entrepreneurial Scorecard and the Perception to Proclivity Process Model.

Practical implications

The practical output of this research is a novel tool for evaluating entrepreneurial perceptions and proclivity through the scorecard. This study adds to the existing research base around entrepreneurial intention and action whilst providing a new model for a guiding framework for the entrepreneurial student and educator journey.

Originality/value

This paper's approach outlines many themes and inherent questions of concern to enterprise educators and university management towards the creation, maintenance, or development of an enterprise course or programme. This research introduces the concepts of entrepreneurial perception and entrepreneurial proclivity, explaining the important role they play in developing students. Additionally, the scorecard has potential for application in a longitudinal context as a means of establishing potential shifts in entrepreneurial perception and proclivity. However, the application is not limited to the scope of higher education, with clear potential to apply this tool and approach within other domains.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Alan Murray

The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on how assessment is used to support the aims of enterprise education leading to recommendations for improvements to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on how assessment is used to support the aims of enterprise education leading to recommendations for improvements to the current approach to the assessment of enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a review of entrepreneurship education literature and a qualitative case study conducted on a sample of enterprise educators at University of the West of Scotland. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Paradoxically, the traditional enterprise education paradigm harms that which it attempts to nurture: entrepreneurial thinking and activity. The rationalised approach to education conflicts with the aims of enterprise educators, and there is evidence of a visible and growing disconnect between academia (the theory) and industry (the practice).

Research limitations/implications

The work is limited as it concentrates on a single case study. The qualitative approach focusses on a specific social field and therefore the findings cannot be generalised to other settings. These limitations can be addressed in future research.

Practical implications

This work has resonance for enterprise educators delivering and assessing entrepreneurial learning in an academic setting and will also be of interest to decision makers within this sector concerned with ensuring academic practice remains aligned to policy and industry requirements.

Originality/value

Enterprise education is well researched; however, there is a gap in the area of enterprise assessment which is under researched and not well understood.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Robert Crammond, Kingsley Obi Omeihe, Alan Murray and Kirstin Ledger

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise social media usage (SMU) as a contributory, knowledge management (KM) tool towards entrepreneurial behaviour amongst small…

Downloads
1242

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise social media usage (SMU) as a contributory, knowledge management (KM) tool towards entrepreneurial behaviour amongst small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Although an underdeveloped concept in entrepreneurship, the conceptual analysis of KM presents evidence which links SMU as complementary to changing KM conventions.

Design/methodology/approach

The pertinent KM and SMU literatures of the SME context were reviewed to form an understanding of this context. Employing a mixed-methods approach, a pragmatic, thematic investigation of SMU-enhanced KM was facilitated.

Findings

Substantial benefits of innovative SMU, as a management tool towards SME entrepreneurialism, were witnessed. SMU enhances the administration of real-time knowledge, encouraging creativity. However, longer-term costs of employing requisite personnel, and anticipated organisational restructuring, present challenges. The paper identifies the potentials of social media technologies in overcoming KM issues. The authors propose a reasoned process model towards entrepreneurial exploitation by acknowledging systematic phases of research, concept, institutionalise, develop, target and assess, referred to as the RCIDTA model.

Practical implications

The authors argue that KM, through social media, facilitates interactions to execute innovative processes within SMEs ever-changing infrastructures. It also informs nascent entrepreneurs, in considering the benefits of systematic KM, and novel SMU, opportunities. The RCIDTA model for SMEs can be utilised in improving knowledge ecosystems of entrepreneurial SMEs, promoting innovation towards sustained organisation growth.

Originality/value

This paper embraces the growing approach of SMEs applying SMU. SMU and its cost efficiency support the start-up activity. This paper highlights central issues concerning the exploitation of sector-specific KM, including organisational strategy, structure, brand formation, fiscal and personnel resource allocation and market share.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2016

Alan Murray, Armando Papa, Benedetta Cuozzo and Giuseppe Russo

The Internet of Things represents the network connection of people, processes, data and things. Due to the relevant position that this intelligent infrastructure is…

Downloads
3164

Abstract

Purpose

The Internet of Things represents the network connection of people, processes, data and things. Due to the relevant position that this intelligent infrastructure is acquiring, the goal of the paper is to investigate the effects of Internet of Things on the companies’ value, with specific reference to the Intellectual Capital value.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on a single case study approach with an empirical analysis which aims to analyse whether and how the introduction of the Internet of Things’ innovations influences the value of the Intellectual Capital owned by a company. The evaluation method used for the empirical analysis is the Economic Value Added (EVA). The application is carried out on the company “Cisco Systems Inc.” by analysing the company’s financial reports covering the period 2007-2014.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the impact of the innovation of Internet of Things on Intellectual Capital owned by a high intensity cognitive company by determining its economic value. The results demonstrate that the introduction of projects involving the use of the Internet of Things has increased the value of Intellectual Capital over the years.

Originality/value

As the Internet of Things can guarantee efficiency, social and individual benefits, the effects of the Internet of Things on company performance and, particularly, on intangible corporate dimensions are analysed. Hence, the paper is directed to fill the literature gap on the analysis and evaluation of the Internet of Things’ impact on Intellectual Capital owned by high intensity cognitive companies. The research proposes strategic advice for decision making of companies interested in new technology investments.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Mansour Javidan, Alan Murray and Gilbert Reschenthaler

A case study of an organisation intransition is examined. It describes aCanadian regional airline which is facingmajor environmental changes andchallenges, and attempts to…

Abstract

A case study of an organisation in transition is examined. It describes a Canadian regional airline which is facing major environmental changes and challenges, and attempts to make the required organisational adjustments. The dynamics of strategic change at that company are then related to the available literature. Of particular interest are the stakeholder model and the literature on organisational learning.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Alan Murray, Kathryn Haynes and Lucian J. Hudson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibilities and problems for collaboration in the area of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability. The…

Downloads
2720

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibilities and problems for collaboration in the area of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability. The paper explores the nature and concept of collaboration and its forms, and critically evaluates the potential contribution a collaborative approach between agencies might offer to these agendas.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores different forms of research on collaboration, together with a UK Government report on collaboration, to evaluate how the issue is addressed in theory and practice.

Findings

Sustainable development creates extensive challenges for a wide range of agencies, including governments, non‐governmental organizations, businesses and civil society. It is unlikely, however, that solutions will be found in any one quarter. Collaboration between agencies in some form would seem a logical step in supporting measures towards a more responsible and environmentally sustainable global economy.

Originality/value

The paper offers new insights into developing a research and praxis agenda for collaborative possibilities towards the advancement of CSR and sustainability.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Alan Murray, Donald Sinclair, David Power and Rob Gray

The purpose of the paper is to explore whether there is any relationship(s) between social and environmental disclosure and the financial market performance of the UK's…

Downloads
9346

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore whether there is any relationship(s) between social and environmental disclosure and the financial market performance of the UK's largest companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two data sets were used in the study. The CSEAR database of UK companies provided the social and environmental disclosure component. The second data were the stock market returns earned by the largest UK companies as listed by The Times 1,000. A series of statistical tests was performed to examine whether any relationship could be detected in either the cross sectional or longitudinal data over a period of ten years.

Findings

No direct relationship between share returns and disclosure was found. Neither had such a relationship been expected, in keeping with the prior literature. However, the longitudinal data revealed a convincing relationship between consistently high(low) returns and the predilection to high(low) disclosure. There is no single convincing theoretical explanation as to why this might be.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the importance of examining a range of hypotheses on longitudinal data when other research suggests that any relationships are unlikely to be unstable year on year. More significantly, this paper is motivated not by a concern to understand better how investors' already‐high returns may be bettered, but rather to explore how the alleged potential of financial markets to contribute to social responsibility and sustainability might be engaged.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Jesse Dillard and Madeleine E. Pullman

Downloads
486

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

1 – 10 of 532