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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2015

Vincent K. Chong and Chanel Y. Loy

This paper examines the effectiveness of the reliance on a leader’s reputation as an informal control tool to mitigate subordinates’ budgetary slack. In addition, it seeks…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the effectiveness of the reliance on a leader’s reputation as an informal control tool to mitigate subordinates’ budgetary slack. In addition, it seeks to explain whether this relationship is mediated by subordinates’ truthfulness in revealing their private information.

Methodology/approach

A laboratory experiment was conducted involving 60 undergraduate business students who participated in the experiment. A 1 × 2 between-subjects design was employed for the experimental study. Each subject assumed the role of a production manager responsible for setting a budget target. The experimental task employed involved a simple decoding task adapted from Chow (1983).

Findings

The results of this study indicate that budgetary slack is lower when a leader’s reputation is favourable than when it is unfavourable. In addition, it is found that subordinates’ truthfulness in revealing private information fully mediates the relationship between a leader’s reputation and budgetary slack.

Originality/value

This paper extends the limited literature on the reliance of informal controls in mitigating budgetary slack by examining a leader’s reputation as an informal control. The findings of this study provide important implications for the design of effective management control systems.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-650-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

M.S. Rao

– The purpose of this paper is to embrace change effectively to achieve organizational development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to embrace change effectively to achieve organizational development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the case studies on two turnaround leadersAlan Mulally and Lou Gerstner. It explains various aspects of organizational change and development. It unveils a blueprint to embrace change effectively.

Findings

It underscores that the only thing constant in the current global business environment is change and competition. It enlightens that change requires a new mindset, tool set and skill set. The only successful leaders are the ones who accept and mould themselves as per the changing times and technologies.

Practical implications

The methodologies adopted by turnaround leaders can be applied to any type of organizational change, in any industry and any size of organization.

Social implications

The social implications of this research suggests that turnaround leaders can do much better by communicating clearly to overcome resistance to lead change effectively.

Originality/value

It differentiates between change and growth. It justifies the need to effect change swiftly in the present dynamic business environment. It concludes that change is inevitable to achieve organizational excellence and effectiveness.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Prasad L. Kaipa

The purpose of this paper is to help leaders to reflect on how to make difficult decisions by developing practical wisdom based on Indian traditions. In complex scenarios…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help leaders to reflect on how to make difficult decisions by developing practical wisdom based on Indian traditions. In complex scenarios, when leaders are is crisis, they often tend to rush into decisions without proper reflection, rely too heavily on data and analytics, and demonstrate an inability to decide based on subtle, intangible and often very important elements like emotion, intuition and spiritual discernment. In this paper, the author discusses what it means to make wise decisions based on the Hindu concept of discrimination (viveka) – that is, the ability to perceive and make fine distinctions and also to notice and value quality which is very important part of spiritual discernment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses four decision-making scenarios from an Indian epic Mahabharata to cast light on dilemmas that seem to trip up so many twenty-first century leaders. The author draws lessons from the four stories and highlight key challenges in decision making – developing spiritual discernment to support logic based and emotion-laden decision making.

Findings

Allowing crisis to drive decisions, failing to recognize and account for the biases and attachments, and not developing good role clarity keep leaders from making the decisions they need to, from a place of ethical clarity. The subtle but essential spirit of ethical decision making is discernment and quality of discernment increases when leaders develop “viveka” or discrimination capability and use it regularly.

Research limitations/implications

It is important to remember that developing skills in using viveka in discernment suggested in this paper requires “unlearning” some of the beliefs and practices that served leaders in the past. This framework might be thought provoking and rich conceptually but only action and practice using this framework with awareness makes managers wise leaders.

Practical implications

This paper proposes a framework for making difficult decisions and has implications for developing managers and leaders who can make decisions with discernment. Especially in these days of complexity and turbulence, we need to develop people to resolve dilemmas wisely and effectively. The framework for developing discernment by using intuition, instinct and emotions along with data effectively can help leader using this framework make wise decisions. The stories of leadership success and failure in the Mahabharata serve to remind us that reactive or unreflective decision making are not the answer to rapid change and uncertainty. Yet, leaders need to be able to make sound decisions rapidly in a complex and changeable context by paying attention to both explicit and tacit factors. Stories open up other paths to cultivating this ability of paying attention to viveka that is at the root of spiritual discernment. With clear engagement with the role of leader; the will to detach from desired outcomes; and a stance of courage, humility and ethical clarity, we have the tools we need to manage accelerating complexity, whatever its source.

Originality/value

Decision-making process is examined holistically – by bringing in recent developments in brain research along with stories and lessons from an ancient epic from India to recognize that making decisions is complex and important element that distinguishes wise leaders from smart leaders. This paper could help smart leaders gain ethical clarity by developing discernment integrating fine qualities of discrimination.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management,the engineering manager has a crucial role to play. The history of theengineer is reviewed and his/her…

Abstract

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, the engineering manager has a crucial role to play. The history of the engineer is reviewed and his/her possible present role in management is considered. Management objectives are outlined and defined and the specific role of the engineer emphasised. The best managers are leaders, in particular effective leaders of teams, and this is a management task well within the grasp of the engineer. The engineer′s specific training and initial experience give him/her special qualifications in this area. Indeed, there seems to be no reason why the engineer should not climb the management ladder right to the top, especially these days when technology is continually growing in importance. The demands made on the effective chief executive are outlined. It would seem that engineering management has come of age and that with the appropriate management training the engineer should be well capable of filling a senior management role.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Alan Hankinson

This regional survey involved 90 small manufacturing firms over the three‐year period, 1997‐2000. Ninety face‐to‐face interviews using a personal, open, unstructured…

Abstract

This regional survey involved 90 small manufacturing firms over the three‐year period, 1997‐2000. Ninety face‐to‐face interviews using a personal, open, unstructured approach were conducted in 90 cluster‐located small manufacturing (engineering) firms with up to 50 employees (but with 75 per cent below 20 staff) in the Hampshire, Sussex, Dorset and Wiltshire region. Selected follow‐up discussions also occurred during the three‐year period. The objectives of the undertaking were: to identify the key factors in the profiles of small firm owner‐managers that influence business performance; and to contribute to the body of knowledge in this area. The full report comprised some 43,000 words and this paper can only be a mere summary of an investigation of immense scope and complexity.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Graham Towl

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1966

It might be said that librarians and documentalists are citizens of two countries—their own and Holland. It therefore came as no surprise when The Hague, with its…

Abstract

It might be said that librarians and documentalists are citizens of two countries—their own and Holland. It therefore came as no surprise when The Hague, with its associations of FID, Donker Duyvis and NIDER (the Dutch equivalent of Aslib) was chosen as the venue for the first Aslib annual conference to be held abroad.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 18 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Daniel Barrett, Janette Benson, Rhiannon Foster and Alan Leader

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conceptual basis and development of Prosper: an emerging and evolving self-directed network and movement for people with lived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conceptual basis and development of Prosper: an emerging and evolving self-directed network and movement for people with lived experience of mental health problems in South West London.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual principles from which Prosper emerged – co-production, recovery and social movement approaches – are outlined. The ways in which these ideas were translated into action, the guiding principles and operation of Prosper are then described.

Findings

An evolving self-directed network and movement has been developed that comprises around 150 “members” and a wider network of 20 service user groups across South West London. As well as open forums, collective actions fall under the themes of “create” (peer support, outreach, campaigns, training) and “collaborate” (partnership working with user-led organisations and a Recovery College, peer support networks, supporting the development of personal health budgets and local commissioning, and consultancy). This network has initially been funded by South West London and St George's Mental Health Trust with a view to it becoming an independent entity.

Originality/value

The innovative and evolving social network and movement for people with lived experience of mental health problems that is continuously influenced and changed by the skills, ideas and energy of its growing and developing membership could act as a useful model for others to follow.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1981

On 19th August, 1981, the Airworthiness Division of the Civil Aviation Authority published the following Grey Paper, which constitutes an amendment to British Civil…

Abstract

On 19th August, 1981, the Airworthiness Division of the Civil Aviation Authority published the following Grey Paper, which constitutes an amendment to British Civil Airworthiness Requirements effective from that date:—

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 53 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Rikki Abzug and Susan Phelps

What are the implications of assuming that employees have the knowledge and ability to direct their own work and make valuable contributions to achieving organizational…

Abstract

What are the implications of assuming that employees have the knowledge and ability to direct their own work and make valuable contributions to achieving organizational success? This article explores some answers to this question by, among others: reviewing ideas of early management thinkers; establishing the pedigree of current management concepts of empowerment and participation; and by extracting lessons from successful management implementation of the latter two concepts in two types of organizations rarely discussed in the management literature: non‐profits and partnerships. Among the lessons for managers is the need to recognize the important roles that strong missions, genuine trust, and widely dispersed information play in attaining organizational success via empowerment and participation. Also examined are some unique and paradoxical challenges presented to leaders if they truly obtain the participation acknowledged as crucial for organizational survival in a postmodern age.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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