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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2019

Shahrokh Nikou, Malin Brännback, Alan L. Carsrud and Candida G. Brush

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the conceptualization and measurement of entrepreneurial intentions. Significant studies anchored in the Theory of Planned Behavior…

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1376

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the conceptualization and measurement of entrepreneurial intentions. Significant studies anchored in the Theory of Planned Behavior use causal statistical approaches to entrepreneurial intentions. This methodological approach, leads to the conclusion that there is a single pathway for all groups of people to achieve business start-up. Even though theory suggests approaches by women entrepreneurs to start a business may be influenced by different factors from those influencing men, results are inconclusive in these analyses. The authors argue that methodological preferences for linear, causal analytical approaches limit the understanding of gender similarities and differences in the business start-up process. The authors propose that when considering diverse samples, it is unreasonable to assume there is only a single pathway leading to business start-up.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA) and data set of 2,038 respondents, the authors investigate factors predicting the intentions to start a business and evaluate the alternative conjunctive paths that emerge.

Findings

The fsQCA results shows that the relationship among conditions leading to entrepreneurial intentions is complex and is best represented as multiple and conjectural causation configurations. In other words, there are multiple significant pathways (refers to equifinality) that predict intentions to start a business start-up, and there are significant differences by gender.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine the roll of gender as a sperate condition in the analysis. This paper offers implications for theory and future research and highlights the complexity of this domain.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

James J. Chrisman and Alan L. Carsrud

How pre‐venture and established business clients perceived thevalue of the strategic, administrative and operating assistance providedby the Small Business Development…

Abstract

How pre‐venture and established business clients perceived the value of the strategic, administrative and operating assistance provided by the Small Business Development Centre (SBDC) is investigated. For both groups the results suggest that clients who received strategic assistance perceived the value of SBDC consulting to be greater than those who did not.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Malin Brännback, Alan Carsrud and William D. Schulte

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the family business succession process using Nonaka's theory of knowledge creation and conceptualisation of a knowledge‐creating

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1421

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the family business succession process using Nonaka's theory of knowledge creation and conceptualisation of a knowledge‐creating place, Ba to enhance one's understanding of critical managerial challenges in family business succession.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on literature review, Nonaka's theory of knowledge creation and knowledge‐creating space is applied to the family business succession process.

Findings

Through literature review and synthesis thereof the paper concludes that Nonaka's theory of knowledge creation is a highly valid framework for analyzing and supporting the family business succession process. The paper proposes that Ba is a perception of a place – the family firm – and a shared purpose among family members in that firm. It is posited that the absence of Ba can be a significant barrier to a family firm adopting a successful succession process. Creating a Ba is essential for family firms to survive.

Research limitations/implications

Only propositions are presented, but they serve as valid research questions for future research.

Originality/value

Previous research of knowledge management processes and applications in family business context is scarce. Moreover, research on succession in family firms has not been considered as a knowledge creating and sharing process. This paper applies a valid and widely used model to the context of family firms and adopts the view that a succession process in essence is a knowledge creating and sharing process.

Details

VINE, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Akin Kocak, Alan Carsrud and Sonyel Oflazoglu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of market, technology, and entrepreneurial orientations (EOs) on both innovation and firm performance. It analyzes the…

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3375

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of market, technology, and entrepreneurial orientations (EOs) on both innovation and firm performance. It analyzes the mediating effects of incremental and radical innovation within the context of entrepreneurial firms in Turkey, an emerging economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically analyses the impact of strategic orientations on firm performance through innovation with a sample of 818 small and medium enterprises in Turkey. To test the proposed model, LISREL is used.

Findings

Proactive market orientation (MO) and technology orientation (TO) lead to radical innovation, while responsive MO strongly affects incremental innovation. EO impacts performance directly and indirectly via both incremental and radical innovation.

Practical implications

Finding suggests that senior management of firms, especially in emerging economies should encourage marketing managers to focus on key trends of markets, both existing and emerging. These marketing managers should find and work with lead users to improve radical product development. This means that those managing marketing need to be well schooled in technology, and they should also possess a proactive MO.

Originality/value

The present study employs a two-part view of the MO construct (responsive and proactive MO). This conceptualization provides a greater degree of precision in the use of the MO concept which was rarely employed in prior studies. Moreover, this paper views strategic orientations as drivers of innovation and examines how radical and incremental innovation mediate the effects of MO, EO and TO on firm performance. Finally, this is one of the few studies to look at all of these factors simultaneously and to include the two-part view of MO.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Rob Smith

Family businesses do not perpetuate themselves. Entrepreneurs must nurture and propagate the values that led to the creation of the very thing most precious to them‐their…

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1143

Abstract

Family businesses do not perpetuate themselves. Entrepreneurs must nurture and propagate the values that led to the creation of the very thing most precious to them‐their business.This of course depends on stability. Nor do these cherished values propagate themselves. To be made meaningful for others, and for future generations, family experiences, values, and achievements must be communicated to others via language, narrative and storytelling, or other forms embedded in the narrative such as symbols. Often a variety of different socially constructed stories may be necessary contingent upon situation, purpose, or need.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2011

Norris Krueger, David J. Hansen, Theresa Michl and Dianne H.B. Welsh

If we are to better understand what it means to think “sustainably,” the entrepreneurship literature suggests that entrepreneurial cognition offers us two powerful tools…

Abstract

If we are to better understand what it means to think “sustainably,” the entrepreneurship literature suggests that entrepreneurial cognition offers us two powerful tools. Human cognition operates with two nearly parallel systems for information processing, intentional and automatic. Entrepreneurial cognition has long focused on how entrepreneurial thinking and action are inherently intentional. Thus, intentions-based approaches are needed to understand how to encourage the identification of actionable sustainable opportunities. But first, however, we need to address key elements of our automatic processing, anchored on deep assumptions and beliefs. In short, if sustainable entrepreneurship is about addressing sustainable opportunities, then before we can take advantage of research into entrepreneurial intentions, we need a better understanding of how we enact our deep mental models of constructs such as “sustainable.”

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Social and Sustainable Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-073-5

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Barbara Bird

This chapter looks at the development of the original contribution “Toward a Theory of Entrepreneurial Competency” in the 1995 volume of the Advances series. The…

Abstract

This chapter looks at the development of the original contribution “Toward a Theory of Entrepreneurial Competency” in the 1995 volume of the Advances series. The reflection discusses the conceptual and career issues underlying that original work. What follows is a reflection on the impact of the original chapter and on the key concept of the competency of learning itself. Among major ideas that emerge from this analysis is that entrepreneurship education helps individuals develop self-concepts and the social roles of entrepreneurs, that the intersection of personality, learning style, and learning effectiveness could be a useful focus of future work, that reflection is an under-developed competency, that success-related competencies need to be the focus going forward, that the atemporality of entrepreneurship and competencies should be tested, that critical entrepreneurship competencies may be industry-specific, and that the relative weights of competencies also need to be considered.

Details

Seminal Ideas for the Next Twenty-Five Years of Advances
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-262-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Robert Alan Baron

The purpose of this paper is to examine the human costs of innovation – the personal difficulties, aside from economic ones, experienced by persons whose jobs are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the human costs of innovation – the personal difficulties, aside from economic ones, experienced by persons whose jobs are permanently eliminated by innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis of the negative personal effects (i.e. intra-individual) resulting from job loss due to innovation was used. These include reduced self-esteem, hope for the future, increased stress and increased and disturbing cognitive inconsistencies.

Findings

Proposals are developed concerning the harmful effects experienced by whose jobs are made unnecessary by innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper, being conceptual, does not involve empirical research; rather it offers suggestions for future research.

Practical implications

Attention is called to the potential “downside” of innovation in terms of the persons whose jobs it renders superfluous. Reasons why entrepreneurship may be especially attractive to these persons are reviewed.

Social implications

Innovation generates many economic benefits but also makes many jobs unnecessary. As a resut, a growing number of persons lose jobs they can never hope to regain. These personal costs adversely affect both their psychological and physical well-being. Further, job loss due to innovation can add to income inequality and so be a source of conflict in society. Efforts to reduce these problems are essential for the continued well-being of both individuals and the societies in which they live.

Originality/value

Past research concerning innovation has focused primarily on its economic effects. This paper extends this research by examining innovations' potentially harmful effects on persons it makes unemployed.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Mohammad Saud Khan, Robert J. Breitenecker and Erich J. Schwarz

The purpose of this paper is to examine how diversity in need for achievement (nfA) a well-established entrepreneurial personality trait impacts team performance…

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1956

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how diversity in need for achievement (nfA) a well-established entrepreneurial personality trait impacts team performance (effectiveness and efficiency) in Austria. In addition, it investigates the interaction effects of Team Mean nfA and relationship conflicts on the nfA diversity-performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data originated from 44 entrepreneurial teams based in nine business incubators in Austria. Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to estimate the model.

Findings

Results indicate that, in general, nfA diversity has a negative impact on entrepreneurial team effectiveness and efficiency. However, acknowledging the importance of nfA for being entrepreneurial, diversity in nfA could improve team effectiveness when the prevailing team nfA (mean) is low. The dysfunctional role of relationship conflicts for entrepreneurial team performance is confirmed; nonetheless, similarity in nfA could help teams to cope more successfully with these potentially negative consequences.

Originality/value

The paper puts forth one of the first empirical investigations of nfA and performance at a team level in an entrepreneurial field setting. Moreover, a contextually specific contribution of examining nfA diversity, team nfA (mean), relationship conflicts and team performance also augments team deep-level diversity and conflict literature. Finally, this study highlights that entrepreneurial teams could effectively leverage their human capital by realizing that some types of deep-level homogeneity (nfA) might prove helpful in neutralizing the damaging effects of relationship conflicts.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Rolland LeBrasseur, Huguette Blanco and John Dodge

A survey of young microfirms was conducted to investigate their growth intentions. The findings confirm the distinct profiles of four types of firms categorized on the…

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1006

Abstract

A survey of young microfirms was conducted to investigate their growth intentions. The findings confirm the distinct profiles of four types of firms categorized on the basis of current and future employment: Lifestyler, Entrepreneur, Manager, and Mover. They differ in terms of the owner's perceptions of the desirability and practicality of growing their firm, and with respect to the moderating variables of industry affiliation, business location, and investment level. Research issues and service implications for business support agencies are identified.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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