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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Pádraig Cotter, Sara Hollwey and Alan Carr

The purpose of this paper is to appraise “transference” and “countertransference” when working with people with intellectual disabilities (PWID).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to appraise “transference” and “countertransference” when working with people with intellectual disabilities (PWID).

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature was conducted, followed by a discussion.

Findings

No research articles were found. Potential reasons for this are discussed. Historical influence, complexity of the topic and resistance among professionals may be contributing factors. Despite this, these phenomena are important for several reasons. These include the high levels of trauma these clients experience; the manner in which they have been marginalised by mainstream society; the strong likelihood of PWID evoking difficult countertransference from therapists; and the myriad of coping mechanisms and defences that these clients may employ.

Research limitations/implications

Research is needed to further current understanding of these issues.

Practical implications

An awareness of these issues amongst practitioners and other key members of a PWID’s system is important.

Originality/value

This is the first review and commentary on these issues.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Sinead O'Connell, Maeve Henchion and Alan Collins

This paper seeks to investigate Irish hoteliers' customer service requirements of their food suppliers and to measure the trade‐offs that hotel buyers are willing to make…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate Irish hoteliers' customer service requirements of their food suppliers and to measure the trade‐offs that hotel buyers are willing to make during the purchase decision.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a quota sample of 100 hotels throughout the Republic of Ireland. Drawing on earlier research and applying conjoint analysis, the study demonstrates how customer service improvements may be achieved through variations in the customer service mix.

Findings

Findings indicate that, for short shelf‐life products, frequency of deliveries and the ability to carry out emergency deliveries generate the highest levels of utility. More utility is created by lower prices in the case of long shelf‐life products. Small food suppliers are found to perform better on product quality and are more responsive in terms of product delivery than larger suppliers. They are perceived to be weaker on pricing, product assortment, and innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of observations for both four‐ and five‐star hotels in the sample limited the effectiveness of cluster analysis, which would greatly assist suppliers targeting specific markets with customer service bundles.

Practical implications

By highlighting the trade‐offs that buyers use in evaluating customer service, the findings provide suppliers with the basis for assessing their own particular service mix. An improvement in perceived customer service may be achieved by reallocating the given resources and effort in favour of those parts of the mix that generate most value for the buyer. The identified trade‐offs also provide manufacturers with the criteria that can be usefully applied to evaluate competing distributors for their products.

Originality/value

By focusing on the hotel sector, the paper provides insights into a much ignored market for food suppliers, which differs considerably from mainstream grocery in terms of concentration, buyer processes and buying criteria.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

J. Goggins

The purpose of this paper is to focus on a number of initiatives in civil engineering undergraduate programmes at the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on a number of initiatives in civil engineering undergraduate programmes at the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) that allow students to complete engineering projects in the community, enabling them to learn by doing.

Design/methodology/approach

A formal commitment to civic engagement was undertaken by the NUIG in 2001 with the establishment of the Community Knowledge Initiative (CKI) to work on mainstreaming civic engagement (service learning) within the curriculum across the institution. Today, the majority of undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes in the College of Engineering and Informatics at NUIG have embedded service learning into their curriculum. These initiatives allow students to work with and in local communities, international communities and multi‐disciplinary groups as part of their academic courses. The paper investigates and shows that community‐based projects can enhance student learning and engagement in a number of ways. At NUIG, these projects are framed by a research orientation, commitments to civic engagement and building university‐community partnerships, city‐university partnerships and partnerships with other official agencies, so that community users can provide real learning problems and contexts for students and researchers and benefit from the results.

Findings

It was found that the students got a sense of pride and satisfaction out of the knowledge that their work may be helping communities and that learning is not just to get marks to pass the exam! The projects can increase the students’ sense of ownership of their own learning. Learners are more motivated when they can see the usefulness of what they are learning and when they can use that information to do something that has an impact on others.

Research limitations/implications

The work represents work done in one institution affecting a region in a country. This can be extended to include more institutions and other regions. This paper presents evidence from the aforementioned projects that by creating service‐based learning the students’ energy in learning can have a positive impact on the community.

Practical implications

The energy and enthusiasm of learners can be better utilised (and increased) by setting assignments as real community‐based projects.

Originality/value

This lies in the design of projects and assessment involving education providers and public for the benefit of learners and the society at large.

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Emir Mangan and Alan Collins

This paper investigates the threats to brand integrity in the hospitality sector where the brand owner is separated from the service provider and runs the risk of falling…

2673

Abstract

This paper investigates the threats to brand integrity in the hospitality sector where the brand owner is separated from the service provider and runs the risk of falling foul of cheating behaviour. It takes the case of the Shamrock bed and breakfast brand in the Irish tourist market. The analysis uses both the perceived risk literature and the “lemons” model developed by Akerlof to highlight potential dangers to the brand emerging on both the demand and supply sides of the bed and breakfast market. The findings suggest that quality variations may encourage the suppliers of high quality services to exit the brand, thereby reducing the average level of quality within the brand. The analysis also demonstrates that as consumers’ perceptions of quality variations increase, their trust in the Shamrock diminishes.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Brian R. Duffy, Gregory M.P. O'Hare, John F. Bradley, Alan N. Martin and Bianca Schoen

In investing energy in developing reasoning machines of the future, one must abstract away from the specific solutions to specific problems and ask what are the…

1074

Abstract

Purpose

In investing energy in developing reasoning machines of the future, one must abstract away from the specific solutions to specific problems and ask what are the fundamental research questions that should be addressed. This paper aims to revisit some fundamental perspectives and promote new approaches to reasoning machines and their associated form and function.

Design/methodology/approach

Core aspects are discussed, namely the one‐mind‐many‐bodies metaphor as introduced in the agent Chameleon work. Within this metaphor the agent's embodiment form may take many guises with the artificial mind or agent potentially exhibiting a nomadic existence opportunistically migrating between a myriad of instantiated embodiments. The paper animates these concepts with reference to two case studies.

Findings

The two case studies illustrate how a machine can have fundamentally different capabilities than a human which allows us to exploit, rather than be constrained, by these important differences.

Originality/value

Aids in understanding some of the fundamental research questions of reasoning machines that should be addressed.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 34 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Nora Hegarty and Alan Carbery

The purpose of this paper is to describe the pilot information literacy programme for undergraduate nursing students as recently developed at Waterford Institute of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the pilot information literacy programme for undergraduate nursing students as recently developed at Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) libraries. The paper outlines the background to the programme, discusses its design and delivery and summarises participating students' initial response to it.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a broadly practical, case study approach in terms of recounting experiences of designing and delivering a dedicated information literacy programme for undergraduate nursing students at WIT.

Findings

Although the project is still at an early or pilot stage, the feedback from the undergraduate students who attended training is very positive. The fact that the programme was so well received in its first year of operation is encouraging and inspiring, going forward.

Practical implications

The paper should be of interest to anyone involved in developing information literacy programmes or in the supply of information to nursing students.

Originality/value

This paper is likely to be of practical interest to academic librarians, who are looking for a fresh approach to information literacy training for undergraduate nursing students at third level institutions of similar scale and size to WIT.

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Alan Brown, Julie Eatock, Dorian Dixon, Brian J. Meenan and John Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to compare a range of quality and continuous improvement strategies and to investigate whether there is a best choice of strategy for use…

5077

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare a range of quality and continuous improvement strategies and to investigate whether there is a best choice of strategy for use within the medical devices sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief literature‐based review of a number of continuous improvement strategies. Comparison of these strategies and a subsequent discussion of the rationale that guides the choice of strategy based on the prevailing conditions. An overview of this process in the context of the medical devices sector is provided.

Findings

Quality and continuous improvement strategies can be differentiated in terms of their cultural or process focus. Moreover, the favoured leadership style of an organisation may play a part in determining which strategies are likely to be most appropriate. From the medical device and healthcare product perspective, regulatory and purchasing considerations will have a role in determining the strategy adopted.

Practical implications

For managers seeking to implement a strategy for continuous improvement, a review of organisational leadership styles may help the decision–making process. For the medical devices sector, in particular, the need to align the strategy adopted with regulatory requirements is perhaps self‐evident. However, only by a detailed understanding of the issues involved in continuous improvement, can all of the attendant benefits be gained.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a link between a given organisation's favoured leadership style and the applicability of a particular continuous improvement strategy. The implications for the medical device and healthcare technologies sector are specifically addressed.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Michele Lloyd

Media power plays a role in determining which news is told, who is listened to and how subject matter is treated, resulting in some stories being reported in depth while…

Abstract

Media power plays a role in determining which news is told, who is listened to and how subject matter is treated, resulting in some stories being reported in depth while others remain cursory and opaque. This chapter examines how domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is reported in mainstream and social media encompassing newspapers, television and digital platforms. In the United Kingdom, newspapers have freedom to convey particular views on subjects such as DVA as, unlike radio and television broadcasting, they are not required to be impartial (Reeves, 2015).

The gendered way DVA is represented in the UK media has been a long-standing concern. Previous research into newspaper representations of DVA, including our own (Lloyd & Ramon, 2017), found evidence of victim blaming and sexualising violence against women. This current study assesses whether there is continuity with earlier research regarding how victims of DVA, predominantly women, are portrayed as provoking their own abuse and, in cases of femicide, their characters denigrated by some in the media with impunity (Soothill & Walby, 1991). The chapter examines how certain narratives on DVA are constructed and privileged in sections of the media while others are marginalised or silenced. With the rise in digital media, the chapter analyses the changing patterns of news media consumption in the UK and how social media users are responding to DVA cases reported in the news. Through discourse analysis of language and images, the potential messages projected to media consumers are considered, together with consumer dialogue and interaction articulated via online and social media platforms.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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