Search results

1 – 10 of 79
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

Michael Messenger, Roger Jones, Bob Usherwood, Frank Windrush, Kenneth Whittaker, Paul Sykes, Alan Duckworth and Alan Day

WHAT is this thing called… accountability?

Abstract

WHAT is this thing called… accountability?

Details

New Library World, vol. 77 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1977

Graham Barnett, Joseph D Hendry, Alan Duckworth, Gerry M Smith and Peter Jackaman

BEFORE THE French Revolution a number of libraries were open to the public, often the result of public‐spirited donations on the part of local men of letters or wealthy…

Abstract

BEFORE THE French Revolution a number of libraries were open to the public, often the result of public‐spirited donations on the part of local men of letters or wealthy bourgeois. Books were generally scholarly and of little interest to the majority of the population, who for the most part were in any case illiterate.

Details

New Library World, vol. 78 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1975

MIKE PEARCE, ALAN DAY, ALAN DUCKWORTH, K SUBRAMANYAM and COLIN STEELE

ONE OF THE questions I get thrown at me at fairly frequent intervals by undiscerning friends is ‘Why don't you go on Mastermind/Brain of Britain/ etc? You're a librarian…

Abstract

ONE OF THE questions I get thrown at me at fairly frequent intervals by undiscerning friends is ‘Why don't you go on Mastermind/Brain of Britain/ etc? You're a librarian. You could do it easily.’

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1975

DON REVILL, GODFREY THOMPSON, ALAN DAY, ALAN DUCKWORTH, BRIAN GRIFFIN, PETER JORDAN and JOHN TEAGUE

ONE CAN BE forgiven for worrying about the ‘Peter principle’ when taking up a post on the practising side of the profession after nine years teaching librarianship.

Abstract

ONE CAN BE forgiven for worrying about the ‘Peter principle’ when taking up a post on the practising side of the profession after nine years teaching librarianship.

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1982

Brian Griffin, Mike Harkin, Alan Day, Alan Duckworth, David Reid and Michael Wills

MY VOTE for the Most Depressing Spectacle of the Month goes to a shelf of leather‐bound, gold‐tooled ‘video classics’ seen in my local video rentals shop. The leather…

Abstract

MY VOTE for the Most Depressing Spectacle of the Month goes to a shelf of leather‐bound, gold‐tooled ‘video classics’ seen in my local video rentals shop. The leather binding and gold lettering looked quite impressive until you touched one of the volumes—Wuthering heights, for example—and realised that this ‘book’ was plastic, every single molecule of it. And empty, unless you counted the video tape.

Details

New Library World, vol. 83 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1975

JOCK MURISON, BRIAN GRIFFIN, ALAN DUCKWORTH, NAZIR AMAD, DON REVILL and LEENA MIEKKAVAARA

THE August issue of NLW excelled itself, perhaps because it seemed to highlight what is the root cause of the malaise in library service and probably the reason in public…

Abstract

THE August issue of NLW excelled itself, perhaps because it seemed to highlight what is the root cause of the malaise in library service and probably the reason in public libraries for our miserable public image, viz, our continuing failure to recognise that the most important elements in our service are people, the contacts we have with the community and the working relationships among the staff, both posing problems of communication.

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1978

Fred Ayres, Alan Duckworth, Margot Lindsay, Mike Pearce and Sarah Lawson

THE PROPHETESSES of Ancient Greece, who were said to provide the Delphic oracles, claimed to have gained their inspiration by breathing a mysterious vapour that rose from…

Abstract

THE PROPHETESSES of Ancient Greece, who were said to provide the Delphic oracles, claimed to have gained their inspiration by breathing a mysterious vapour that rose from a cleft in the floor. This then gave them convulsions and put them in a fit state for Apollo to make use of them to deliver his messages to mankind. The whole operation was highly suspect, since the output was in the form of mutterings, and a sort of ancient information officer in the guise of a priest was needed to interpret them to the enquirer. The end product was often sound advice, although the answer to an awkward question was given in such a way that whatever happened it could be claimed to have come true.

Details

New Library World, vol. 79 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1981

Paul Sykes, Gordon Johnson, Alan Samways, Valerie Belsey, Alan Duckworth and George McMurdo

AT FIRST glance the leading article in NLW for June, entitled ‘Reform again’, suggested a stirring of the loins of that dormant beast local government reorganisation and…

Abstract

AT FIRST glance the leading article in NLW for June, entitled ‘Reform again’, suggested a stirring of the loins of that dormant beast local government reorganisation and not—as it turned out—the structure of the Library Association. Of the former some might exclaim, ‘Not that again!’ in the belief that the 1974 upheaval is too fresh and painful in the memory for objective consideration. But, for a number of reasons, a re‐appraisal of the situation is timely. First, although the polemics of victors may fashion a version of history for a few years, unsound principles do not remain dominant forever. Secondly, a number of district councils are renewing their efforts to reclaim some services, including libraries, lost to the English counties in 1974. And, even if they fail, it is probable that when there is a new government in a year or so (of whatever hue) the botched job emanating from the 1972 Local Government Act will be tidied up. Then, at the very least, the politicians will see to it that there is a major revision of boundaries, if only to recognise the existence of modern communications and living styles, both of which have a marked effect on that which politicians hold most dear— voting patterns. Therefore, in the profound hope that local government lunacy cannot continously triumph over commonsense, it can be assumed that at the next re‐organisation the nature of local government functions and their distribution will not be regarded as favours to be horse traded in the same way that some senior posts were allocated in 1974. (‘Our borough engineer for your librarian and public health inspector’…remember?)

Details

New Library World, vol. 82 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1978

Alan Duckworth, Margot Lindsay, Bernard Palmer and Wilfred Ashworth

WITH ‘STAR WARS’ established as the brightest phenomenon since the skateboard, and inter‐galactic adventures all the rage, perhaps it is not a bad time to speculate on the…

Abstract

WITH ‘STAR WARS’ established as the brightest phenomenon since the skateboard, and inter‐galactic adventures all the rage, perhaps it is not a bad time to speculate on the librarian's role in outer space. Not that I've seen the film yet, and don't expect to for a while, seeing as we're still waiting for ‘The jazz singer’ at our local cinema. Nevertheless, as someone who may live long enough to see the start of real space adventure, if not long enough to see ‘Star wars’, I can't help but wonder just how the librarian will fit in.

Details

New Library World, vol. 79 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1976

Alan Duckworth

‘'E'S ASLEEP,’ said Jock and nodded towards the enquiry desk. Ciderman looked up from the evening paper, which he now knew by heart, having already that day memorised the…

Abstract

‘'E'S ASLEEP,’ said Jock and nodded towards the enquiry desk. Ciderman looked up from the evening paper, which he now knew by heart, having already that day memorised the Daily mirror, Sun, Daily mail and Daily express. He had some of the Guardian, Times and Daily telegraph off pat too, and even though his politics denied him such intimacy with the Morning star, he was pretty hot on current affairs. His dreams, when he was sleeping the ‘Strongbow’ off in the hostel were as much like Henry Kissinger's as anybody's, though perhaps it was as well for the world that he wasn't in the same position to realise them when he woke up. He looked at the enquiry desk and saw the librarian's grey head cradled on his arms.

Details

New Library World, vol. 77 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of 79