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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Alan M. Collins and Richard G. George

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether or not mavens’ dissemination activities are likely to promote or hinder retailers’ store brand premiumisation attempts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether or not mavens’ dissemination activities are likely to promote or hinder retailers’ store brand premiumisation attempts, by revealing the relationship between mavens’ price and non-price on-pack extrinsic cue search and their store brand purchasing behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a hypothetic-deductive approach and develops a model of mavens’ store brand purchasing behaviour. The model is tested using SEM on a US data set containing 457 respondents. A full discussion of the direct, indirect and total effects is provided.

Findings

Mavens’ store brand purchasing behaviours are strongly linked to their price search activities and negatively related to their use of non-price on-pack extrinsic cues. This indicates that their dissemination activities are likely to stress lower prices and hence price competition rather than promote other cues used to infer quality. Thus, mavens are likely to inhibit retailers’ store brand premiumisation attempts. Mavens’ investments in time engaged in search activities are strongly linked to social returns rather than private financial savings.

Research limitations/implications

The work is based on data collected using an online survey in one region of the USA where store brands are not as prevalent in other countries such as the UK.

Practical implications

The investigation of non-price on-pack extrinsic cues reduces mavens’ store brand purchasing behaviours while the use of price cues increases them. This suggests that even with mavens’ market expertise that a non-price extrinsic cue deficit continues to exist for these products. Consequently, retailers need to re-examine and rework the cues contained on pack to convey more positive consumption-related information if mavens are to become store brand advocates.

Originality/value

Rather than conceptualising the maven as possessing market wide knowledge, this research adopts a domain specific perspective arguing that price mavenism can be distinguished from product-related mavenism with consequences for the set of extrinsic cues used as part of the maven’s search process. In doing so, it reveals the conflicting effects that these maven dimensions have on purchasing behaviours and the likely effects on mavens’ dissemination activities.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Alan Collins, Maeve Henchion and Paul O’Reilly

The Irish food industry is of significant importance to the Irish economy. Given its dependence on UK multiple retailers, their supply chain management practices have…

Abstract

The Irish food industry is of significant importance to the Irish economy. Given its dependence on UK multiple retailers, their supply chain management practices have considerable implications for the whole of the Irish economy. Retailers’ attempts at improving efficiency at their regional distribution centres have resulted in the growing use of consolidation centres whereby food products from several manufacturers are consolidated into full loads for delivery into RDCs. Results of three case studies suggest that the use of a particular form of consolidation (i.e. coupled‐consolidation where in‐bound logistics are coupled with consolidation services) results in the imposition of costs, especially in terms of lost flexibility, to food manufacturers. The distribution of these costs is asymmetric, with smaller firms bearing the greater costs.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Sarah Jane Flaherty, Mary McCarthy, Alan M. Collins, Claire McCafferty and Fionnuala M. McAuliffe

Health apps offer a potential approach to support healthier food behaviours but a lack of sufficient engagement may limit effectiveness. This study aims to use a user…

Abstract

Purpose

Health apps offer a potential approach to support healthier food behaviours but a lack of sufficient engagement may limit effectiveness. This study aims to use a user engagement theoretical lens to examine the factors that influence app engagement over time and may prompt disengagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological exploration of the lived experience was used. Women from a lower socioeconomic background (based on the occupation and employment status of the household’s primary income earner) were randomly assigned to use one of two apps for a minimum of eight weeks. Multiple data collection methods, including accompanied shops, researcher observations, interviews, participant reflective accounts and questionnaires, were used at different time-points to examine engagement. Theoretical thematic analysis was conducted to explore the engagement experience and relevant social, personal and environmental influences.

Findings

Healthy food involvement appears to drive app engagement. Changes in situational involvement may contribute to fluctuation in engagement intensity over time as the saliency of personal goals change. Negatively valenced engagement dimensions may contribute to the overall expression of engagement. A lack of congruency with personal goals or an imbalance between perceived personal investment and value was expressed as the primary reasons for disengagement.

Research limitations/implications

Situational involvement may act as a trigger of different engagement phases. There is a need to better distinguish between enduring and situational involvement in engagement research.

Practical implications

Individual characteristics may shape engagement and propensity for disengagement, which highlights the practical importance of incorporating tailored features into app design.

Originality/value

Findings broaden the current conceptualisation of engagement within the digital space and prompt a reconsideration of the role of situational involvement and negatively valenced dimensions throughout the engagement process.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Allan Collins

The Japanese are investing in the development function — experimental design techniques contribute an estimated 50% towards the quality of Japanese goods and processes…

Abstract

The Japanese are investing in the development function — experimental design techniques contribute an estimated 50% towards the quality of Japanese goods and processes. Quality specialist Alan Collins reveals how SPD can help you enhance the final uality of your product to achieve the competitive edge.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Stephen McClelland

Build a better card reader and the world will beat a path to your door Emerson might have said. For one Cardiff‐based company it may be turning out to be true.

Abstract

Build a better card reader and the world will beat a path to your door Emerson might have said. For one Cardiff‐based company it may be turning out to be true.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Sinead O'Connell, Maeve Henchion and Alan Collins

This paper seeks to investigate Irish hoteliers' customer service requirements of their food suppliers and to measure the trade‐offs that hotel buyers are willing to make…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate Irish hoteliers' customer service requirements of their food suppliers and to measure the trade‐offs that hotel buyers are willing to make during the purchase decision.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a quota sample of 100 hotels throughout the Republic of Ireland. Drawing on earlier research and applying conjoint analysis, the study demonstrates how customer service improvements may be achieved through variations in the customer service mix.

Findings

Findings indicate that, for short shelf‐life products, frequency of deliveries and the ability to carry out emergency deliveries generate the highest levels of utility. More utility is created by lower prices in the case of long shelf‐life products. Small food suppliers are found to perform better on product quality and are more responsive in terms of product delivery than larger suppliers. They are perceived to be weaker on pricing, product assortment, and innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of observations for both four‐ and five‐star hotels in the sample limited the effectiveness of cluster analysis, which would greatly assist suppliers targeting specific markets with customer service bundles.

Practical implications

By highlighting the trade‐offs that buyers use in evaluating customer service, the findings provide suppliers with the basis for assessing their own particular service mix. An improvement in perceived customer service may be achieved by reallocating the given resources and effort in favour of those parts of the mix that generate most value for the buyer. The identified trade‐offs also provide manufacturers with the criteria that can be usefully applied to evaluate competing distributors for their products.

Originality/value

By focusing on the hotel sector, the paper provides insights into a much ignored market for food suppliers, which differs considerably from mainstream grocery in terms of concentration, buyer processes and buying criteria.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Samuel Cameron, Alan Collins and Ford Hickson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of visible body piercings (VBP) in explaining the extent of self‐reported workplace sexual orientation discrimination.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of visible body piercings (VBP) in explaining the extent of self‐reported workplace sexual orientation discrimination.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the 2002 wave of the UK Gay Mens’ Sex Survey, OLS and logit equations are estimated to analyse the extent of self‐reported denial of job opportunities.

Findings

The possession of visible body piercings is shown to increase the level of discriminatory activity. There is evidence that tongue piercings are the major contributory type of body decoration. The overall effect is seemingly ameliorated for those gay men who engage in more extensive concealment effort with regard to their sexual orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is to some extent self‐selecting, which may affect the results. Further studies using alternative methodologies would be required to explore this issue.

Practical implications

This paper sheds light on the importance, or otherwise, of presumed visual clues such as body piercing in triggering discriminatory behaviour towards gay men.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the self‐reported experience of post‐entry discrimination by gay men using a major national survey comprising over 15,000 observations.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Alan Collins, Maeve Henchion and Paul O’Reilly

Customer service in logistics, through its direct impact on a firm’s market share, its total logistics costs and ultimately its profitability, is a critical determinant of…

Abstract

Customer service in logistics, through its direct impact on a firm’s market share, its total logistics costs and ultimately its profitability, is a critical determinant of competitiveness. Examines what customer service means from a logistics perspective and traces out UK retailers’ changing requirements. It provides the results of a survey which investigates the importance UK grocery retailers place on particular elements of customer service and assesses Irish food exporters’ relative performance, vis‐à‐vis their competitors on the UK market. A comparison of these results with previous research by the same authors concerned with Irish food exporters’ internal measurement of customer service finds that Irish food exporters are perceived to lack flexibility by their grocery customers and that internal measures of customer service are limited. Furthermore, the measures exporters employ for monitoring purposes are not appropriately aligned with those logistics variables which UK retailers consider important. Reconfiguring the supply chain with respect to inventory location is found to be one means of improving perceived flexibility.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Alan M Collins, James Martin Cronin, Steve Burt and Richard J. George

This paper aims to investigate the role of store brands as a time- and money-saving heuristic in the context of an omnipresent store brand hierarchy. Drawing on the work…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of store brands as a time- and money-saving heuristic in the context of an omnipresent store brand hierarchy. Drawing on the work of Tversky and Kahneman (1982), it proposes that the store brand hierarchy is characterised by many of the traits of frequently used heuristics employed by grocery shoppers.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on Chaiken’s (1980) model of information processing and Stigler’s (1961) perspective on the economics of information search, the study deductively establishes a model of store brand proneness to reveal the role of store brands as time- and money-saving heuristic. The model is tested on a sample of 535 US households using structural equation modelling and subsequent multigroup analysis based on two subsamples of households experiencing high financial pressure but who differ in terms of time pressure.

Findings

The findings provide strong support for store brands as a time- and money-saving heuristic and as a substitute for price search among households experiencing financial and time pressures.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that the study is based on a sample of households located in one region of the US market.

Practical implications

Retailers need to be aware that any extension of the store brand portfolio beyond the traditional multi-tiered price/quality hierarchy risks undermining what has emerged to be a valuable heuristic used by certain shoppers.

Originality/value

This study extends our understanding of the role of store brands in the marketplace by going beyond their conceptualisation as a competitive device used by retailers to instead position them as a decision-making tool used by consumers. It also deepens our understanding of the boundary between rational search activities and the transition to the use of frequently flawed heuristics within the shopping process.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

Details

Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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