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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Dania Mouakhar-Klouz, Alain d’Astous and Denis Darpy

The aim of the research presented in this paper is to enhance our understanding of self-gift giving behavior. Self-regulatory theory is used as a conceptual support to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research presented in this paper is to enhance our understanding of self-gift giving behavior. Self-regulatory theory is used as a conceptual support to achieve this objective. The main idea that is explored is that consumers’ self-gift purchase intentions vary across contexts and situations to the extent that these are compatible or not with their self-regulatory mindset, whether it is chronic or situational.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies, using a scenario-based experiment, were conducted to investigate the effects that regulatory focus has on consumers’ intentions to buy themselves a gift.

Findings

The results support the proposition that the chronic form of regulatory focus in success and failure situations has a significant impact on the intention to purchase a gift to oneself and show that the situational form of regulatory focus has an influence on self-gift purchase intention as well. They also confirm that situations that are congruent with consumers’ self-regulatory mindset lead to stronger self-gift purchase intentions.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this research lies in delineating the role that some specific dispositional and situational factors play in shaping consumers’ perceptions of success and failure events and how this impacts the eventual purchase of a gift to oneself. This contrasts with previous research on self-gift giving, where success and failure situations are assumed to be perceived similarly by consumers. Marketing managers wishing to stimulate consumers’ propensity to buy themselves gifts should consider using regulatory focus as a segmentation basis. Marketing communications should be adapted to consumers’ self-regulatory mindset.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

François A. Carrillat, Alain d’Astous and Emilie Morissette Grégoire

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate how firms can use social media such as Facebook to recruit top job prospects.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how firms can use social media such as Facebook to recruit top job prospects.

Design/methodology/approach

In the context of a fictitious event presumably sponsored by a potential employer, a sample of university students became members of a new private and secret Facebook user group dedicated to this event for a period of four days. They were exposed to event sponsorship activation messages varying systematically with respect to the mode of processing (i.e. passive or active) and their focus (i.e. the brand or the event).

Findings

The results show that their expectations as regards the salary that they would require to become employees were higher in the active mode of processing. Also, their attitude toward the sponsor as an employer was more favorable when the activation messages focussed on the brand rather than on the event. In addition, further analyses showed that the effects of message focus and mode of processing on the attitudinal responses toward the sponsoring employers were mediated by the degree of elaboration and richness of social interactions of the Facebook group's members as well as their attitude toward the activation messages.

Practical implications

Managers seeking to gain a recruiting edge through their social media presence should use online messages that stimulate more active processing and that have high entertainment value since this leads to more favorable responses toward the employer. These messages should insist more on the brand than on the event that is sponsored.

Originality/value

This study is the first study to foray into the usage of social networking sites for recruitment purposes. It represents one of the few research efforts to monitor the interactions of users in a social media platform by means of a controlled experiment performed in situ through the creation of an ad hoc Facebook group.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Sadrudin A. Ahmed and Alain d'Astous

This article presents the results of a survey of 250 Canadian male consumers. In this study consumer judgements of products made in both highly and newly industrializing…

Abstract

This article presents the results of a survey of 250 Canadian male consumers. In this study consumer judgements of products made in both highly and newly industrializing countries were obtained in a multi‐attribute and multidimensional context. The results show that younger and less affluent respondents react more favorably towards products made in newly industrializing East Asian countries. The country‐of‐origin image of East Asian countries is less negative for products that generate a medium level of involvement (e.g., a VCR). This negative image of East Asian countries is attenuated by providing other product‐related information to consumers such as brand name and warranty. East Asian countries are perceived more negatively as countries of design than as countries of parts and assembly. In comparison with products made in highly developed countries, products made in East Asia are perceived to be poorer in terms of performance, quality and originality but more economical.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2013

François A Carrillat and Alain d'Astous

The complementarity factor stipulates that a sponsorship leveraging strategy can lead to suboptimal consumer responses unless advertising complements, rather than…

Abstract

The complementarity factor stipulates that a sponsorship leveraging strategy can lead to suboptimal consumer responses unless advertising complements, rather than reinforces, the nature of the event-sponsor relationship. Study 1 showed that the best strategy when the sponsor is an official product provider for the event is to leverage the sponsorship through advertisements that emphasise its overall image and value as opposed to its products. However, the reverse is true when the sponsor is an official event partner, where a product-oriented sponsorship leveraging yields the best outcomes. Study 2 replicated the complementarity factor effect using a different event and different set of stimulus brands. It showed that consumer attributions, with respect to the sponsor's motivations, are the key mediating psychological mechanism.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Alain d'Astous and Sadrudin A. Ahmed

This paper presents the results of a survey of 187 male consumers in Morocco. In this study, country‐of‐origin information was manipulated along three dimensions: country…

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a survey of 187 male consumers in Morocco. In this study, country‐of‐origin information was manipulated along three dimensions: country of design, country of assembly and country of materials origin. Consumer judgments of the quality and purchase value of automobiles, televisions and shoes were obtained in a multi‐cue context. The results show that Moroccan consumers make a distinction between the different dimensions of country‐of‐origin information and that their perceptions are significantly affected by each dimension. However, the pattern of effects varies across dependent variables and products. Differences in the evaluations of countries are greatly attenuated when country‐of‐origin information is presented along with other informational cues such as price and brand name.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Alain d'Astous and Dong Li

The purpose of this paper is to examine country perceptions in China from the point of view of the personality concept.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine country perceptions in China from the point of view of the personality concept.

Design/methodology/approach

A country personality scale developed in a Western country was adapted to the Chinese social context and used to position 11 different countries, including China, on six personality dimensions. This was accomplished by means of a survey of 184 adult Chinese people from the city of Beijing.

Findings

The results show that the adapted scale has good psychometric properties, that it behaves appropriately with respect to some theoretical expectations, and that it brings about results that are consistent with common sense and with previous country image research.

Research limitations/implications

The study should be replicated with a more representative sample of Chinese people and a larger array of country stimuli.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the country personality scale can be used to better understand how Chinese consumers think of a product's country of origin and suggest appropriate product positioning strategies to help multinational corporations define their strategic actions with respect to China.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Sadrudin A. Ahmed, Alain d’Astous and Christian Champagne

This article presents the results of a survey of 202 male Taiwanese consumers. In this study, consumer judgements of two technological products varying in their level of…

Abstract

This article presents the results of a survey of 202 male Taiwanese consumers. In this study, consumer judgements of two technological products varying in their level of complexity made in highly, moderately, and newly industrialised countries were obtained in a multi‐attribute context. The results show that the country‐of‐origin image of moderately and newly industrialised countries was less negative for technologically simpler products (i.e. a television) than they were for technologically complex products (i.e. a computer). It appears that the negative image of moderately and newly industrialised countries can be attenuated by making Taiwanese consumers more familiar with products made in these countries and/or by providing them with other product‐related information such as brand name and warranty. Newly industrialised countries were perceived more negatively as countries of design than as countries of assembly, especially in the context of making technologically complex products. The image of foreign countries as producers of consumer goods was positively correlated with education. The more familiar consumers were with the products of a country, the more favourable was their evaluation of that country. Consumer involvement with purchasing a technologically complex product such as a computer was positively associated with the appreciation of products made in moderately industrialised countries. Managerial and research implications are derived from these results.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Sadrudin A. Ahmed and Alain d'Astous

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in‐depth examination of country‐of‐origin (COO) perceptions of consumers in a multinational setting. It shows how explanatory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in‐depth examination of country‐of‐origin (COO) perceptions of consumers in a multinational setting. It shows how explanatory factors like demographics, familiarity with a country's products, purchase behaviour and psychological variables jointly work to explain consumers' COO perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study using a drop‐off and pick‐up survey among three samples of consumers in Canada, Morocco and Taiwan. The final sample size was comprised of 506 male consumers. The data were analyzed using factor analysis to group countries of origin and analyses of variance to relate COO perceptions to the explanatory variables.

Findings

The familiarity with products made in a country was the strongest predictor of country perceptions, followed by nationality and the manufacturing process and product complexity dimensions of country evaluation. Canadians had the highest propensity to distinguish between countries of origin on the basis of product technological complexity and manufacturing dimensions and Moroccans the least. Taiwanese appeared to show animosity towards China.

Research limitations/implications

The study used an only‐male sample from a limited number of countries. Future research should seek to develop a multi‐dimensional scale for the familiarity construct. They should also explore the concept of consumer capacity to distinguish between COOs. Cross‐national studies using cognitive style scales should be carried out. A qualitative examination of Taiwanese's COO perceptions is also recommended.

Practical implications

It seems important to increase consumers' familiarity with a COO and its products to improve its overall perception. Products made in Latin American countries have the lowest level of familiarity in general. Thus, increasing familiarity with their products is particularly important to achieve export success.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the marketing and international business literatures and provides insights to international marketers by bringing valuable information that can help make decisions as to where to manufacture and how to promote global products. It provides guidance as to what types of nations are likely to require multi‐dimensional information about countries of origin.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Alain d'Astous and Valérie Landreville

This paper reports the results of an experimental study where four characteristics of premium‐based sales promotions were manipulated in the context of a computer…

Abstract

This paper reports the results of an experimental study where four characteristics of premium‐based sales promotions were manipulated in the context of a computer purchase: the attractiveness of the premium, the extent to which it fits the product category, the reception delay of the premium, and the mention of its value. The results show that these factors had interactive effects on consumer reactions. Thus, although the attractiveness of the premium generally had a positive impact on consumer appreciation of the promotional offer, a promotion including an unattractive premium was nevertheless positively evaluated if the premium was a good fit to the product category. Sales promotions, including a premium that fits well the product category, were less likely to be perceived as manipulative. However, if the product‐premium fit was poor and the premium was not attractive, mentioning the value of the premium helped to reduce the perceptions of manipulation intent. It is concluded that more research is needed on this managerially relevant topic in light of the complex dynamics that appear to underlie the relationships between the characteristics of premium‐based promotions and consumer reactions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Sadrudin A. Ahmed and Alain d'Astous

This article presents the results of a survey of 209 Mainland Chinese male consumers carried out in the late 1990s. In this study, consumer judgements of products made in…

Abstract

This article presents the results of a survey of 209 Mainland Chinese male consumers carried out in the late 1990s. In this study, consumer judgements of products made in both highly and newly industrialised countries were obtained in a multi‐attribute and multi‐dimensional context. As expected, the results showed that Chinese consumers' perceptions of country of design and country of assembly were much more positive for products made in highly industrialised countries than for those made in newly industrialised countries. However, some exceptions to this are addressed. A multi‐attribute analysis with country‐of‐origin variables indicates that the perception of a T‐shirt quality was strongly related to price and product satisfaction assurance, whereas the perception of a T‐shirt purchase value was mainly linked to satisfaction assurance. It is therefore concluded that Chinese consumers, having recently emerged from a totalitarian state‐controlled market condition, are in the process of forming enduring attitudes towards products made in foreign countries. This provides excellent opportunities for countries/brands that wish to build an image of fashion leadership in the Chinese market to gain a first‐mover advantage.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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