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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Alexander John Heeren, Ajay S. Singh, Adam Zwickle, Tomas M. Koontz, Kristina M. Slagle and Anna C. McCreery

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of sustainability knowledge to pro-environmental behaviour. A common misperception is that unsustainable…

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2632

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of sustainability knowledge to pro-environmental behaviour. A common misperception is that unsustainable behaviours are largely driven by a lack of knowledge of the underlying societal costs and the contributing factors leading to environmental degradation. Such a perception assumes if individuals “only knew better” they would engage in more sustainable behaviours. The “knowledge deficit model” has been critiqued for not including social psychological research about how knowledge is incorporated into decision-making and its subsequent effect on human behaviour. The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model has been used extensively to examine intention to engage in a variety of behaviours, therefore this model is applied to examine the effect knowledge has in predicting behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

To better understand these relationships, the authors examined the relationships between sustainability behaviours through an online survey of over 500 students at a large university in the USA.

Findings

Results indicate that knowledge had a significant, albeit weak, bivariate correlation with behaviour (r = 0.113, p < 0.001). However, when controlling for TPB variables (attitudes, norms and perceived behavioural control), knowledge was not a significant predictor of behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude with several implications to guide university sustainability programmes.

Originality/value

This study places sustainable knowledge in the context of other social psychological factors which also influence behaviour. The results show that as the students are educated about sustainability, fostering behaviour change will require education not only about how actions affect sustainability but also about social norms, attitudes towards sustainable behaviours and the level of self-efficacy in doing those behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Sanjay Kumar Singh and Ajai Pratap Singh

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine relevant organizational “human” aspects that support circular economy (CE); and second, to investigate the…

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2077

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine relevant organizational “human” aspects that support circular economy (CE); and second, to investigate the influence of perception of organizational justice (OJ), psychological empowerment on job satisfaction (JS) through mediating role of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

The study used survey questionnaire. The data were statistically analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) to test hypotheses of the study.

Findings

OJ positively and significantly influences psychological empowerment. Also, it was found that OCB and psychological empowerment to positively and significantly influence JS. Furthermore, OCB positively and significantly mediates the influence of OJ and psychological empowerment on JS.

Practical implications

Employees should be provided with fair and empowering environment to derive positive outcomes in terms of organizational citizenship behavior and JS. The study also suggests recognizing the importance of OCB in an organization to enhance JS and support CE.

Originality/value

The study presents empirical evidence in Indian context on how to encourage employees to display voluntary job behaviors and keep them job satisfied.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Deepti Verma, Vaibhav Tripathi and Ajai Pratap Singh

This study aims to identify factors affecting generation Z as the early adopters of mobile commerce (m-commerce). The research seeks to explore their behavioral intention…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify factors affecting generation Z as the early adopters of mobile commerce (m-commerce). The research seeks to explore their behavioral intention to adopt m-commerce in India with consideration of gender differences while providing empirical validation for the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a modified TPB model has been used to explain generation Z’s intention to adopt m-commerce. The proposed model was tested using a survey method with a sample of 245 students from a private university in Northern India. Subgroup analysis was performed to find gender differences in the process of adopting m-commerce.

Findings

All three independent constructs have a positive influence on the behavioral intention of generation Z to adopt m-commerce. Further, the male subgroup has a lower beta value for attitude and higher beta value for subjective norm in comparison to the female subgroup. For perceived behavioral control, no significant difference in beta value across gender could be established.

Practical implications

A better understanding of generation Z behavioral intentions will be of great use to telecom companies, marketers and electronic commerce companies to formulate strategies to expedite the use of m-commerce. As gender plays an important role in attitude and subjective norms, companies are advised to target their communication tactics in accordance to gender.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is one of the first to test TPB and generation Z association in the context of m-commerce adoption in India. Data regarding the difference between the two genders has also shed light on the uniqueness of the context.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Ajay Kumar and Anil Kumar Kashyap

Shopping motivation has been extensively explored in traditional marketing context but less in online shopping. Utilitarian attribute of online shopping is one of the…

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3610

Abstract

Purpose

Shopping motivation has been extensively explored in traditional marketing context but less in online shopping. Utilitarian attribute of online shopping is one of the success factors of e-retailing. The purpose of this paper is to explore the utilitarian shopping motivation in online shopping and validate these factors through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from the 183 regular online shoppers. The collected data were analysed through exploratory factor analysis and CFA using Amos 22 version.

Findings

This paper explored the utilitarian shopping motivation of online shopping into five factors, i.e. information availability, accessibility, searchability, product availability and convenience.

Research limitations/implications

The research is conducted on online shoppers to measure their utilitarian motives of shopping online. Further research may be conducted to investigate other motives of online shopping. The sample is taken from Central India which is not enough to generalise the findings. Research may be conducted in other regions and on different segment of respondents to know the impact of geographical variance on utilitarian perspectives of online shoppers.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a significant input in online retailing platform, and it will contribute to the theory of shopping motivations in online shopping context and provide valuable inputs for developing online marketing strategies. The findings of the study also aid to retail practitioners in analysing retailing’s current transformation due to digitalization.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2009

Peter Hwang and Ajai S. Gaur

We argue that multinational enterprises (MNEs) not only strive to minimize transaction costs but also attempt to maximize transaction values when interacting with local…

Abstract

We argue that multinational enterprises (MNEs) not only strive to minimize transaction costs but also attempt to maximize transaction values when interacting with local firms in foreign markets. We put forth our thesis regarding MNE governance structure, that it is contingent on the institutional environment of the host country and the characteristics of the transaction. Specifically, we suggest that MNEs’ choice of market, hierarchy or hybrid (joint ventures) form of governance, depends on the interplay between the costs and benefits of a transaction relationship. For high knowledge content products/services, MNEs choose hierarchy when the institutional environment is not well developed. As the institutional environment develops, hybrid replaces hierarchy. However, in a very strong institutional environment, hierarchy again turns out to be optimal for MNEs. For low or no knowledge content products/services, the presence of market is possible in a very advanced institutional environment.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Vibhash Kumar, Sonal Jain and Ajay Kumar Singh

This study investigates the various factors which lead to the higher employer brand and studies the relationship of employer branding (EBR) with essential aspects of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the various factors which lead to the higher employer brand and studies the relationship of employer branding (EBR) with essential aspects of corporate life, namely, corporate social responsibility (CSR), levels of motivation experienced by employees and the intention to stay (ITS).

Design/methodology/approach

The study solicited a research sample from employees working in five sectors, information technology, hospitality, banking and consulting sector (n = 296). The study employed structural equation modeling (SEM) to test the nomological network of EBR.

Findings

The study underpins the sub-constructs of EBR. A direct positive and significant relationship was found between EBR and CSR and motivation fully mediated between EBR and ITS.

Originality/value

This study uniquely contributes to the literature by exploring the mediating role of motivation on EBR and ITS's relationship. The study validates the nomological network of EBR by considering its various organizational aspects and the corresponding intertwined relationships.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Hyun Gon Kim, Ajai S. Gaur and Debmalya Mukherjee

As multinational companies enter different countries, the extent of cultural unfamiliarity they face depends on their most recent entry. We examine this pattern of added…

Abstract

Purpose

As multinational companies enter different countries, the extent of cultural unfamiliarity they face depends on their most recent entry. We examine this pattern of added cultural distance between a newly entered target country and the closest previous one and its effect on ownership decisions in each cross-border acquisition (CBA). We also examine the combined effect of added cultural distance and time between successive acquisitions on such decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample came from the Thomson Financial Securities Data Corporation (SDC) Platinum database, which spans different source and target countries for a 25-year period (1980–2014). We collected firm- (acquirer and target), industry-, country-, and transaction-level variables from SDC. After merging information from the different sources, the final sample comprised 10,423 CBA observations from 138 target countries.

Findings

Our findings reveal that the ownership share decision is affected negatively by added cultural distance but positively by the time between two successive acquisitions. In addition, prior ownership and geographic distance moderate the relationship between added cultural distance and ownership in CBAs.

Practical implications

Our findings suggest that MNCs' managers who consider CBAs need to carefully examine closest previous target information and CBA experience, rather than focusing on direct cultural distance between the focal firm and target firm. Additionally, they should also consider the relevance of key contingency factors.

Originality/value

We disentangle the effects of added cultural distance on CBA ownership decisions and explore the boundary conditions of this relationship.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Surya Prakash, Gunjan Soni and Ajay Pal Singh Rathore

The purpose of this paper is to assist a manufacturing firm in designing the closed-loop supply chain network under risks that are affecting its supply quality and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assist a manufacturing firm in designing the closed-loop supply chain network under risks that are affecting its supply quality and logistics operations. The modeling approach adopted aims at the embedding supply chain risks in a closed-loop supply chain (CLSC) network design process and suggests optimal supply chain configuration and risk mitigation strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The method proposes a closed-loop supply chain network and identifies the network parameter and variables required for closing the loop. Mixed-integer-linear-programming-based mathematical modeling approach is used to formulate the research problem. The solutions and test results are obtained from CPLEX solver.

Findings

The outcomes of the proposed model were demonstrated through a case study conducted in an Indian hospital furniture manufacturing firm. The modern supply chain is mapped to make it closed loop, and potential risks in its supply chain are identified. The supply chain network of the firm is redesigned through embedding risk in the modeling process. It was found that companies can be in great profit if they follow closed-loop practices and simultaneously keep a check on risks as well. The cost of making the supply chain risk averse was found to be insignificant.

Practical implications

Although the study was conducted in a practical case situation, the obtained results are not indiscriminate to the other circumstances. However, the approach followed and proposed methodology can be applied to many industries once a firm decides to redesign its supply chain for closing its loop or model under risks.

Originality/value

By using the identified CLSC parameters and applying the proposed network design methodology, a firm can design/redesign their supply chain network to counter the risk and accordingly come up with planned mitigation strategies to achieve a certain degree of robustness.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Surya Prakash, Gunjan Soni, Ajay Pal Singh Rathore and Shubhender Singh

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to analyze the risks present in perishable food supply chain and to determine the most effective risk mitigation…

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3580

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to analyze the risks present in perishable food supply chain and to determine the most effective risk mitigation strategies. It is achieved by understanding the dynamics between various risks in perishable food supply chain and modeling them using interpretive structural modeling (ISM).

Design/methodology/approach

Four categories and 17 types of risk are established from literature and conducting brainstorming sessions with managers/engineers in Indian dairy firms. A methodology is proposed using ISM, risk priority number and risk mitigation number to prioritize risk mitigation strategy decisions for the dairy industry.

Findings

For a perishable food supply chain, risk positioned at lower levels (levels 1 or 2) in the hierarchy should be targeted first, while formulating mitigation strategies. To investigate further, risk- enabling factors which are identified for an Indian dairy firm for these levels 1 and 2 risks and mitigation strategy prioritization show that supplier side risks are more dominant followed by market risks and process risks.

Research limitations/implications

This proposed methodology has not been statistically validated or empirically tested, and factors taken are in the Indian context, but the authors believe that the study is highly relevant to other markets as well because the ISM-based analysis is for generic perishable food supply chain environment.

Practical implications

This study provides a useful approach to managers/decision makers to identify, analyze and prioritize risk in the supply chain. It also provides insights into the mutual relationships of supply chain risks which would help them to focus on the effective risk mitigation strategies formulation. The study provides the insights to benchmark and risk management in the dairy industry environment with priority considerations.

Originality/value

This paper provides an integrated approach to identifying, quantify, analyze, evaluate and mitigate the risks of perishable food (in the dairy environment) in the Indian context.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Case study
Publication date: 13 October 2017

Abhinandan Kumar Jain and Kaveri Misra

In early 2013, Mr. Deepak Kumar, Chairman and Group CEO of MakeMyTrip1 (MMT), summoned a meeting to discuss about redesigning the MMT Homepage2. It was a three-hour…

Abstract

In early 2013, Mr. Deepak Kumar, Chairman and Group CEO of MakeMyTrip1 (MMT), summoned a meeting to discuss about redesigning the MMT Homepage2. It was a three-hour meeting at the Hindustan Conference Room at the company's head office in Gurgaon, India. Theis meeting was attended by key members of the homepage website redesign team comprising the CBO, Analytics head, User Experience (UX) head, Product head and the Tech head (CTO). As a pre-read for the meeting, Ajay Singh, Product Head, shared his findings3 that could help in defining the issues faced by visitors to the homepage of MMT.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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