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Case study
Publication date: 28 March 2014

Shamkant Damle and Debjit Roy

Quality management among multiple business units of a large organization is often difficult if each unit is run independently in terms on their quality standards. In this…

Abstract

Quality management among multiple business units of a large organization is often difficult if each unit is run independently in terms on their quality standards. In this case, participants will discuss how Bukhari Group of Companies should establish a common brand image through standardized quality. Participants should also understand that common brand image for diverse products does not mean identical level of rejection or customer complaints. It should be understood that different markets have different tolerance for product failures. The participants can chalk out the measures the protagonist of the case should be able to take to effectively steer the Bhukari Group to achieve profits and excellence.

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Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Abstract

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Sajad Fayezi, Andrew O’Loughlin, Ambika Zutshi, Amrik Sohal and Ajay Das

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of behaviour-based and buffer-based management mechanisms on enterprise agility using the lens of the agency theory.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of behaviour-based and buffer-based management mechanisms on enterprise agility using the lens of the agency theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on data collected from 185 manufacturing enterprises using a survey instrument. The authors employ structural equation modelling for data analysis.

Findings

The results of this study show that buffer-based mechanisms used for dealing with agency uncertainty of supplier/buyer not only have a positive impact on agility of enterprises, but are also contingent on the behavioural interventions used in the relationship with a supplier/buyer. Behaviour-based mechanisms also positively impact enterprise agility through mitigating the likelihood of supplier/buyer opportunism.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that buffer- and behaviour-based management mechanisms can be used as complementary approaches against agency uncertainties for enhancing enterprise agility. Therefore, for enterprises to boost their agility, it is vital that their resources and capabilities are fairly distributed across entities responsible for creating buffers through functional flexibility, as well as individuals and teams dealing with stakeholder engagement, in particular, suppliers and buyers.

Originality/value

The authors use the lens of the agency theory to assimilate and model characteristic agency uncertainties and management mechanisms that enhance enterprise agility.

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Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Ajay Das and Rina Shah

Similar to Western countries, the early origins of special education in India started with Christian missionaries and nongovernmental agencies which stressed a charity…

Abstract

Similar to Western countries, the early origins of special education in India started with Christian missionaries and nongovernmental agencies which stressed a charity model of serving populations such as the visually, hearing, and cognitively impaired. However after its independence from Great Britain in 1947, the Indian government became more involved in providing educational, rehabilitation, and social services. Thus over the past four decades, India has moved gradually toward an inclusive education model. This chapter discusses the implementation of such a model related to the prevalence and incidence rates of disability in India as well as working within family environments that often involve three to four generations. Also included are challenges that an inclusive education system faces in India, namely, a high level of poverty, appropriate teacher preparation of special education teachers, a lack of binding national laws concerned with inclusive education, a dual governmental administration for special education services, and citizen’s and special education professionals strong concern about whether inclusive education practices can be carried out.

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Special Education International Perspectives: Practices Across the Globe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-096-4

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Ahmed Doha, Ajay Das and Mark Pagell

The purpose of this study is twofold. First, to examine the contingent role of the product life cycle on the efficacy of purchasing practices. Second, to use the results…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold. First, to examine the contingent role of the product life cycle on the efficacy of purchasing practices. Second, to use the results of the first investigation to explore the adequacy of the profit‐maximization framework for explaining purchasing decision making. This second investigation is motivated by growing evidence on the role of institutional factors in explaining supply chain management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from a sample of North American manufacturing firms, across four standard industry sectors, are analysed using ANOVA and linear regression, to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that product life cycle has a contingent effect on the efficacy of some purchasing practices but not on others. Interestingly, the results suggest that the profit‐maximization framework is capable of explaining only some purchasing decisions but not others; firms adopt certain purchasing practices in certain product life cycle stages, even when these practices have no apparent effect on purchasing performance. This raises a need for an alternative framework to profit‐maximization, to better understand purchasing decision making.

Originality/value

The paper pioneers an empirical examination of how product life cycle moderates the relationship between purchasing practices and purchasing performance. The paper presents novel insights on the inadequacy of the rational profit‐maximization framework to explain purchasing decision making. Furthermore, the paper presents testable propositions on the role of institutional factors that are potentially driving purchasing decision making in managing the product life cycle contingency.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Ajay Das and Robert B. Handfield

Just‐in‐time (JIT) has been written about since the early 1970s. Studies have investigated the growth of JIT sourcing and its implications. However, there has not been as…

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Abstract

Just‐in‐time (JIT) has been written about since the early 1970s. Studies have investigated the growth of JIT sourcing and its implications. However, there has not been as much discussion of the issues faced by companies involved in the pursuit of JIT sourcing in a global supply chain. Undertakes a systematic review of the JIT sourcing and logistics literature and highlights key findings. Notes a number of key problems and best practice issues in the area, followed by an empirical examination of the potential benefits of adopting JIT policies in global sourcing and logistics relative to non‐JIT global buyers. Compares results attained with those of a group of buyers employing JIT sourcing and domestic suppliers. Significant differences in a number of performance areas are found in the sourcing and logistics practices between companies following JIT practices with their global suppliers, as compared to companies not doing so. Finds that some aspects of domestic JIT sourcing and logistics are applicable across borders, while others are not. Concludes with a research agenda for future investigations in the area.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

S. Tamer Cavusgil and Ajay Das

Methodological consistency and rigour continue to be remaining challenges in cross‐cultural research. Scholars need to reach a degree of standardization in the choice and…

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3352

Abstract

Methodological consistency and rigour continue to be remaining challenges in cross‐cultural research. Scholars need to reach a degree of standardization in the choice and application of research methods in conducting research across national and cultural boundaries. Seeks to propose a general framework for conducting cross‐cultural research and to demonstrate the use of such a framework to a specific research domain ‐ global sourcing activities. In the process reviews the existing empirical work in global sourcing and illustrates the application of appropriate research procedures.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Abstract

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Special Education International Perspectives: Practices Across the Globe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-096-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Bibhu Prasad Mishra, Bibhuti Bhusan Biswal, Ajay Kumar Behera and Harish Chandra Das

In spite of the fact that literature shows that big data analytics (BDA) pass on a distinct corporate ability, little is thought about their performance impacts…

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the fact that literature shows that big data analytics (BDA) pass on a distinct corporate ability, little is thought about their performance impacts, specifically logical conditions. Establishing this research in the dynamic capability view (DCV) and corporate culture and dependent on an sample of 310 Indian production industries, the purpose of this paper is to experimentally study the impacts of BDA on corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate green performance (CGP) using variance-based structural equation modeling (for example, PLS).

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to accumulate data sets to examine research hypothesis. The authors pre-examined the survey with six scholastics and six directors from production firms in India. With the help of their sources of data, the authors have adjusted their wordings to improve the transparency and guarantee that length of the survey is accurate. Finally, the questionnaire was prepared for definite data collection.

Findings

The authors conclude that BDA has noteworthy effect on CSP/CGP. Notwithstanding, the authors did not find proof for directing role of flexible direction and control direction in the connections among BDA and CSP/CGP. This research offers a more nuanced comprehension of the performance ramifications of BDA, and in this way, it is tending to the critical inquiries of how and when BDA can improve in supply chains.

Originality/value

This investigation makes helpful commitments to the BDA research and its effect on CSP/CGP. To the authors’ best of information, this is the first hypothesis-focused approach to clarify the effect of BDA on ecological and social supportability. Second, this investigation likewise gives empirical proof that BDA impact on CSP/CGP and is free of flexible or control direction of the industry.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Yogesh P. Gadekar, B.D. Sharma, Ajay Kr. Shinde, Arun Kr. Das and S.K. Mendiratta

This paper aims to evaluate the effects of inulin (3 per cent), chitosan (1 per cent) and carrageenan (0.5 per cent) addition on the physico-chemical, sensory and textural…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the effects of inulin (3 per cent), chitosan (1 per cent) and carrageenan (0.5 per cent) addition on the physico-chemical, sensory and textural attributes of restructured goat meat products. Health conscious consumers are much more interested in product with added health benefit. Keeping this in mind, this study was undertaken to find out effective ingredient for low fat restructured goat meat product.

Design/methodology/approach

Formulation for restructured goat meat blocks was optimized and four different formulation containing different ingredients, namely, control, inulin (3 per cent), chitosan (1 per cent) and carrageenan (0.5 per cent), were used to find out best ingredient for healthier goat meat product and various physicochemical and sensory properties of the product were evaluated.

Findings

Results showed that addition of carrageenan improved (p < 0.01) the product yield (86.0 per cent) significantly. The proximate composition, expressible water and water activity were similar. The moisture retention percentage was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced (86.0 per cent) due to addition of inulin. Carrageenan significantly (p < 0.05) increased the lightness (42.4) and yellowness (10) values. Significantly (p < 0.05) lower shear force values were observed in inulin (0.5) and chitosan (0.4) containing samples than control (0.7 kg/1.5 cm2). Hardness values were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in restructured product containing chitosan (56.1 N/cm2) and carrageenan (59.4 N/cm2). Similarly, springiness values were significantly (p < 0.05) lower (0.7 vs 0.8 cm) in carrageenan containing product. Inulin, chitosan and carrageenan did not significantly influence the sensory attributes of restructured goat meat product. It is concluded that inulin, chitosan and carrageenan could be used to improve technological and functional attributes of the healthier restructured goat meat product.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may benefit from efforts to modify shelf life of the product by modifying packaging condition.

Originality/value

The healthier meat-based restructured goat meat product has been developed, and the effect on its quality characteristics have been extensively examined, limited research has focused on this aspect.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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