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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Ajantha Sisira Kumara and Ramanie Samaratunge

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of health insurance ownership of individuals in the Sri Lankan labor force and to examine how insurance ownership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of health insurance ownership of individuals in the Sri Lankan labor force and to examine how insurance ownership impacts healthcare utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first used logit model to explore determinants of health insurance ownership. The authors then employed propensity score matching method to estimate impact of insurance ownership on healthcare utilization. Data were obtained from national survey of self-reported health in Sri Lanka – 2014 (n=59,276). National survey of self-reported health in Sri Lanka – 2014 was conducted by the Department of Census and Statistics from January to December 2014.

Findings

Results showed that individuals with higher educational attainments, headed by literate-heads, based in urban sector, employed in formal sector, and with health adversities and higher degree of risk propensity are more inclined to have a health cover. Health insurance ownership reduces the likelihood of utilizing public facilities while increasing the likelihood of utilizing private facilities for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and acute illnesses. Welfare consequences of expanding insurance ownership are doubtful due to oligopolistic private healthcare market and adverse selection issue faced by insurers in Sri Lanka.

Originality/value

This is the first study examining health insurance–healthcare utilization nexus based on Sri Lanka-wide microdata. Also, the study applies bias-corrected matching methods to establish causal links between two constructs. Without being so generalized, healthcare utilization is examined in terms of NCD care and Acute illnesses care, which improves robustness of results and leads to evidence-based healthcare policies.

Peer review

The peer review history for this paper is available at: https//publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-05-2019-0333.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Asankha Pallegedara and Ajantha Sisira Kumara

Compared to other neighbouring South Asian countries, Sri Lanka performs well in terms of education outcomes. Education is provided by the government for free from primary…

Abstract

Purpose

Compared to other neighbouring South Asian countries, Sri Lanka performs well in terms of education outcomes. Education is provided by the government for free from primary school level to the first-degree University level, yet households’ private education expenses are steadily increasing over time. Thus, this paper analyses trends and determinants of household private education expenditures using the country-wide micro-data from 1990 to 2013.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) 1990/91, 2002 and 2012/13 data along with annual school census data, this paper examines the relationship between private education expenditure patterns and the observed changes of reported both demand-side and supply-side factors. In particular, the present paper analyses determinants of household private education expenditures within the two-part model econometric framework by taking into account location and time fixed-effects.

Findings

The results show that trend of spending privately for education is increasing over time with rising household income. Rural, Tamil and Islamic households and those headed by less-educated members are less likely to spend privately for education. The results also confirm that improved-supply-side factors can significantly lower the household burden arising from out-of-pocket education expenditure.

Research limitations/implications

Unavailability of panel data and missing data on several districts due to security concerns are limitations of the study.

Social implications

The trend of increasing private education expenses has implications on equity concerns of education in Sri Lanka, and it can undermine the purpose of free public education policy.

Originality/value

To our knowledge, this is the first study for Sri Lanka that examines patterns and determinants of private education expenditures using nationwide data for last two decades. This paper applies novel econometric techniques to account for various issues in household survey data analysis.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-07-2019-0445

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Ajantha Sisira Kumara and Vilani Sachitra

The World Health Organization issued its global action plan on physical activities 2018–2030, emphasizing the importance of context-specific evidence on the subject…

Abstract

Purpose

The World Health Organization issued its global action plan on physical activities 2018–2030, emphasizing the importance of context-specific evidence on the subject. Accordingly, this study aims to provide unique and important policy insights on trends and drivers of participation in physical exercises by academic community in Sri Lankan universities.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, we collected cross-sectional data (n = 456) in 2020 using a survey, and first, estimated a double-hurdle model to uncover covariates influencing likelihood and intensity of physical exercises overall. Second, count-data models are estimated to capture regularity of key exercises.

Findings

The results reveal that about 50% of members do not participate in any general physical exercise. Older members (marginal effect (ME) = 3.764, p < 0.01), non-Buddhists (ME = 54.889, p < 0.01) and alcohol consumers (ME = 32.178, p < 0.05) exhibit a higher intensity of participating in exercises overall. The intensity is lower for rural members (ME = −63.807, p < 0.01) and those with health insurance covers (ME = −31.447, p < 0.05). Individuals diagnosed for chronic illnesses show a higher likelihood of exercising but, their time devotion is limited. The number of children the academic staff members have as parents reduces the likelihood, but for those who choose to exercise have higher time devotion with increased number of children. The covariates play a similar role in determining regularity of key exercises: walking, jogging and exercising on workout machines.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply a need to promote exercising in general and particularly among younger, healthy, insured and female individuals living in rural sector.

Originality/value

The study covers an under-researched professional sub-group in an under-researched developing context, examining both the likelihood and regularity of exercising as both dimensions are equally important for individuals to maintain healthy lives.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Nilupama Wijewardena, Ramanie Samaratunge, Ajantha Sisira Kumara, Alex Newman and Lakmal Abeysekera

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether family-to-business support acts as a job resource that attenuates the negative effects of work demands on the stress and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether family-to-business support acts as a job resource that attenuates the negative effects of work demands on the stress and creativity of women micro-entrepreneurs in the informal sector in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 359 women micro-entrepreneurs and their respective case officers in local government were used to test the hypothesized relationship between work demands and their creativity through the mediating mechanism of stress and the moderating effect of family-to-business support on the said relationship.

Findings

Work demands reduced creativity through heightening the levels of stress faced by women micro-entrepreneurs. However, family-to-business support reduced the negative influence of work demands on creativity through stress.

Practical implications

Women micro-entrepreneurs should build strong family ties to obtain support from family members. In addition, government training programs that target women micro-entrepreneurs should be extended to include their immediate family members.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by examining whether family-to-business support buffers the negative effects of work demands for women micro-entrepreneurs in the informal sector. In doing so it makes a theoretical contribution by testing the key tenets of the JD-R model in entrepreneurial settings.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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