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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Aizzat Mohd Nasurdin, Cheng Ling Tan and Sabrina Naseer Khan

This paper aims to examine the effects of high-performance work practices (HPWPs) (participation, training and compensation) on nurses’ job performance (task and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of high-performance work practices (HPWPs) (participation, training and compensation) on nurses’ job performance (task and contextual) through the mediating role of job satisfaction. As nurses form the bulk of health-care professionals, their performance at work is crucial in determining patient satisfaction regarding care quality. HPWPs have been recognized as having the ability to affect employees’ work attitudes and behaviours positively. Specifically, these practices foster job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect the survey data on 639 staff nurses working in large private hospitals in Malaysia. Data were subsequently analysed using the partial least squares method.

Findings

The findings indicate that job satisfaction serves to mediate the relationships between the three HPWPs (participation, training and compensation) and the two dimensions of job performance (task performance and contextual performance).

Research limitations/implications

First, as all variables were measured using self-reports, a common-method bias could exist (Podsakoff et al., 2003). Hence, future researchers may want to combine self-assessments and supervisory or peer assessment to improve the validity of the outcomes. Second, the cross-sectional nature of this study limits our ability to make causal inferences. Bias could happen because the study examined both exogenous and endogenous variables at the same time. Thus, a longitudinal approach taken in the future could cross-validate the current findings and provide additional support regarding the causality of the HPWPs-job performance relationship. Third, the data were collected from staff nurses working in large private hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia. Thus, one should be careful to generalize the findings to different health-care professional groups and organizations.

Practical implications

From the practical perspective, it is evident from the findings that as job satisfaction is able to enhance job performance and given the need for nurses to provide quality health-care services, private hospital authorities concerned with encouraging greater job performance among their nursing workforce need to provide adequate support to their employees. This could be achieved through the implementation of HPWPs. Perceptions of the extent of a hospital’s HPWPs in terms of participation, training and compensation, have significant and positive effects on nurses’ level of job satisfaction. Therefore, it would be worthwhile for private hospitals to encourage more opportunities for nurses to participate in decision-making regarding their work. In addition, frequent training activities will be able to enhance nurses’ knowledge, skills and abilities, resulting in greater satisfaction

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to investigate the effects of HPWPs on nurses’ job performance in the Malaysian private health-care context. As studies using Eastern samples are relatively limited, the findings from this study would serve to expand the extant literature from a cross-cultural perspective.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2006

Aizzat Mohd. Nasurdin, T. Ramayah and Yeoh Chee Beng

The aim of this study is to determine the effects of organizational structure (formalization and centralization) and organizational climate on job stress in a non‐Western…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to determine the effects of organizational structure (formalization and centralization) and organizational climate on job stress in a non‐Western context. Data were collected from a sample of 151 salespersons working in the stock broking industry of Malaysia. Regression results demonstrated that both structural variables (formalization and centralization) have a positive influence on job stress. Organizational climate dimension, however, has no effect on stress. Implications for managerial practice and future research are provided.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Choo Ling Suan and Aizzat Mohd Nasurdin

This study aims to examine the impact of supervisor support and to assess the moderating role of gender on employee work engagement in the context of the Malaysian…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of supervisor support and to assess the moderating role of gender on employee work engagement in the context of the Malaysian hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 438 customer-contact employees in Malaysian upscale hotels and tested using the partial least squares technique.

Findings

The findings indicated that supervisor support positively influences work engagement and that this positive relationship was stronger for male employees than female employees.

Research limitations/implications

The results highlight that supervisor support plays a critical role in fostering greater employee work engagement. In addition, different approaches need to be utilized by supervisors in supporting their male and female subordinates.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing literature by examining the role of gender in moderating the relationship between supervisor support and work engagement, especially within the context of a developing country (i.e. Malaysia), using structural equation modelling.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Choo Ling Suan and Aizzat Mohd Nasurdin

– This study aims to examine the impact of specific human resource management practices on employees’ work engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of specific human resource management practices on employees’ work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered using surveys from a sample of 438 customer-contact employees attached to 34 upscale hotels throughout Malaysia and analyzed using partial least squares technique.

Findings

The findings showed that service training and performance appraisal have a positive and significant influence on work engagement. The proposed model was able to explain 16.2 per cent of the variance in work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The findings indicate that hotel authorities can enhance work engagement of their customer-contact employees by improving service training and refining performance appraisal practices.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies that focus on the specific effect of individual human resource management practices on work engagement, especially within the context of a developing country (i.e. Malaysia) using structural equation modelling.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Aizzat Mohd. Nasurdin and Soon Lay Khuan

The paper aims to examine the links between organizational justice (distributive justice and procedural justice) and job performance (task performance and contextual…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the links between organizational justice (distributive justice and procedural justice) and job performance (task performance and contextual performance). The moderating role of age in the above‐mentioned relationship was also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered using self‐administered questionnaires from a sample of 136 customer‐contact employees within the telecommunications industry of Malaysia.

Findings

The results demonstrated that distributive justice had a significant and positive relationship with task performance. In a similar vein, procedural justice was found to be significantly and positively related to contextual performance. Age, however, did not moderate the justice‐performance relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The participants in this study were customer‐contact workers employed by one established telecommunication company in Malaysia. Thus, generalization of the results may be limited. Besides, other variables relating to the organization, job, and individual could be included in future studies. Using multiple raters for assessing job performance is also recommended.

Practical implications

The results from this study can be used to gain a better insight into how justice perceptions affect job performance of Malaysian employees.

Originality/value

The impact of organizational justice dimensions as direct antecedents to performance has been examined in many studies across industries and countries. Nonetheless, to the best of one's knowledge, this is the first study that has sought to test the moderating role of age in the justice‐performance connection in a Malaysian setting.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Halil Zaim, Veland Ramadani, Sait Revda Dinibutun, Shqipe Gërguri-Rashiti and Dina Sabry Said

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of knowledge management (KM) processes on human resource management’s (HRM’s) performance in family-owned…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of knowledge management (KM) processes on human resource management’s (HRM’s) performance in family-owned organizations. Therefore, a model is proposed to explain the core processes of KM and their effects on HRM's performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A field study is conducted based on data collected from family-owned companies in Turkey. The survey instrument is a self-administered questionnaire composed of 36 questions in total. There are three demographic questions, 18 questions aim to investigate KM processes and 15 questions aim to investigate HRM practices.

Findings

The results show that KM processes have significant positive relationships with HRM performance. Among the processes of KM, knowledge generation (KG) is found to have the most significant effect. This study shows that KM processes are enhancing HRM performance in family-owned organizations.

Research limitations/implications

First of all, it is conducted on family-owned companies. Hence, the results may change based on types of organizations. Second, convenience sampling was used in data collection. The majority of data were collected through HRM departments who were available, reliable and easy to access. Despite many advantages of this sampling technique on major disadvantage is lacking clear generalizability. For this reason, it is presumed that HRM awareness is high in the selected participants. Different sampling methods may lead to different results. Thus, for future research, it would be useful to make cross-cultural and cross-sectorial studies to compare the business cultures and to find more accurate outcomes related to KM and HRM implementations.

Originality/value

Nowadays, most of the family-owned companies are well aware of the statement that both KM and HRM have significant positive impacts on organizational outcomes. This research's findings indicate that KM processes enhance HRM performance in family-owned organizations. Therefore, family-owned organizations should pay more attention on KM processes and the linkage between KM and HRM in order to obtain better HRM results.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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