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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1968

NOT perhaps the most vintage of Farnboroughs from the point of view of new aircraft and new technology, but undoubtedly one of the most successful in relation to the…

Abstract

NOT perhaps the most vintage of Farnboroughs from the point of view of new aircraft and new technology, but undoubtedly one of the most successful in relation to the business done. Some fifteen major orders worth over £32½ million were announced, bringing the total order book for the industry this year to more than £782 million already. This exceeds by a handsome margin the new business won by the industry in any nine‐month period in the past, and it is expected that by the end of the year orders worth well over £800 million will have been received. Highlights of the new British hardware on show were the Hawker Siddeley Nimrod and production Harriers on the military side; the B.A.C. One‐Eleven 500, the Handley Page Jetstream, the Garrett‐engined Short Skyvan, and the Beagle Pups showed the resurgence of the industry's civil interests. The number of foreign aircraft that appeared, sponsored in the main by Rolls‐Royce, bore witness to the strength of Britain's aero engine and aircraft equipment industry, and further evidence of this was found in the exhibition proper with many examples of major items of equipment having been adopted for overseas markets. The overall impression at Farnborough was a new‐found confidence in the future of the industry exemplified by a more aggressive and effective export sales policy that has already proved our ability to deliver the goods. It is not possible to cover all the exhibits shown at Farnborough, but the report following describes many of the interesting items.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 40 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1975

APPLIED Technology, Middle East and European marketing and technical support representative of PF Industries Inc, will exhibit ground support equipment supplied to…

Abstract

APPLIED Technology, Middle East and European marketing and technical support representative of PF Industries Inc, will exhibit ground support equipment supplied to airlines worldwide.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1970

Accles & Pollock Ltd. of Oldbury, Worcestershire, a TI Steel Tube Division company, will be exhibiting a comprehensive range of precision steel tube and tubular products…

Abstract

Accles & Pollock Ltd. of Oldbury, Worcestershire, a TI Steel Tube Division company, will be exhibiting a comprehensive range of precision steel tube and tubular products, including plain, annularly convoluted and thin wall tube, at Farnborough.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Abstract

Details

Strategic Airport Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-58-547441-0

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1992

AEM will be exhibiting in Hall 4, Stand G1. The exhibit will illustrate AEM's comprehensive range of accessory repair and overhaul services for electrical, hydraulic…

Abstract

AEM will be exhibiting in Hall 4, Stand G1. The exhibit will illustrate AEM's comprehensive range of accessory repair and overhaul services for electrical, hydraulic, avionic and safety equipment. Farnborough will also be used as the official launch of AEM's Boeing 737 Landing Gear Total Support Pro‐gramme, which encompasses a complete exchange and overhaul service. Copies of Aviation Accessory News will be available on the stand.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 64 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1964

TO say that the Twenty‐fourth S.B.A.C. Show was an unqualified success is perhaps to gild the lily. True there were disappointments— the delay which kept the TSR‐2 on the…

153

Abstract

TO say that the Twenty‐fourth S.B.A.C. Show was an unqualified success is perhaps to gild the lily. True there were disappointments— the delay which kept the TSR‐2 on the ground until well after the Show being one—but on the whole the British industry was well pleased with Farnborough week and if future sales could be related to the number of visitors then the order books would be full for many years to come. The total attendance at the Show was well over 400,000—this figure including just under 300,000 members of the public who paid to enter on the last three days of the Show. Those who argued in favour of allowing a two‐year interval between the 1962 Show and this one seem to be fully vindicated, for these attendance figures are an all‐time record. This augurs well for the future for it would appear that potential customers from overseas are still anxious to attend the Farnborough Show, while the public attendance figures indicate that Britain is still air‐minded to a very healthy degree. It is difficult to pick out any one feature or even one aircraft as being really outstanding at Farnborough, but certainly the range of rear‐engined civil jets (HS. 125, BAC One‐Eleven, Trident and VCIQ) served as a re‐minder that British aeronautical engineering prowess is without parallel, while the number of rotorcraft to be seen in the flying display empha‐sized the growing importance of the helicopter in both civil and military operations. As far as the value of Farnborough is concerned, it is certainly a most useful shop window for British aerospace products, and if few new orders are actually received at Farnborough, a very large number are announced— as our ’Orders and Contracts' column on page 332 bears witness. It is not possible to cover every exhibit displayed at the Farnborough Show but the following report describes a wide cross‐section beginning with the exhibits of the major airframe and engine companies.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1982

Normalair‐Garrett Ltd., (Stand No. N31) part of the Westland plc Group of Yeovil, Somerset, is exhibiting a wide range of products which demonstrate the company's diverse…

Abstract

Normalair‐Garrett Ltd., (Stand No. N31) part of the Westland plc Group of Yeovil, Somerset, is exhibiting a wide range of products which demonstrate the company's diverse capabilities in control systems and precision components for the aerospace industry.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

SungKwan Ku, Hojong Baik and Taehyoung Kim

The surveillance equipment is one of the most important parts for current air traffic control systems. It provides aircraft position and other relevant information…

Abstract

Purpose

The surveillance equipment is one of the most important parts for current air traffic control systems. It provides aircraft position and other relevant information including flight parameters. However, the existing surveillance equipment has certain position errors between true and detected positions. Operators must understand and account for the characteristics on magnitude and frequency of the position errors in the surveillance systems because these errors can influence the safety of aircraft operation. This study aims to develop the simulation model for analysis of these surveillance position errors to improve the safety of aircrafts in airports.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates the characterization of the position errors observed in airport surface detection equipment of an airport ground surveillance system and proposes a practical method to numerically reproduce the characteristics of the errors.

Findings

The proposed approach represents position errors more accurately than an alternative simple approach. This study also discusses the application of the computational results in a microscopic simulation modeling environment.

Practical implications

The surveillance error is analyzed from the radar trajectory data, and a random generator is configured to implement these data. These data are used in the air transportation simulation through an application programing interface, which can be applied to the aircraft trajectory data in the simulation. Subsequently, additionally built environment data are used in the actual simulation to obtain the results from the simulation engine.

Originality/value

The presented surveillance error analysis and simulation with its implementation plan are expected to be useful for air transportation safety simulations.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 90 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

6001

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1979

The Paris/Le Bourget International Air and Space Show is the world's oldest international show and is of considerable importance. It will have 548 exhibitors from 23…

Abstract

The Paris/Le Bourget International Air and Space Show is the world's oldest international show and is of considerable importance. It will have 548 exhibitors from 23 countries and there will be 165,000 square metres of display area — with 10,000 square metres for the out‐door static exhibits. The numbers of chalets is to be increased by 55.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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