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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1972

The Airlite 71 headset has a clip in facility on a boom arm for the rapid interchange of microphones. This includes the Dyn‐A‐Mike microphone plus pre‐amplifier for the…

Abstract

The Airlite 71 headset has a clip in facility on a boom arm for the rapid interchange of microphones. This includes the Dyn‐A‐Mike microphone plus pre‐amplifier for the replacement of carbon microphones.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 44 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1970

Accles & Pollock Ltd. of Oldbury, Worcestershire, a TI Steel Tube Division company, will be exhibiting a comprehensive range of precision steel tube and tubular products…

Abstract

Accles & Pollock Ltd. of Oldbury, Worcestershire, a TI Steel Tube Division company, will be exhibiting a comprehensive range of precision steel tube and tubular products, including plain, annularly convoluted and thin wall tube, at Farnborough.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

This is our report on this first international assembly of Aircraft Maintenance and Engineering, held in Zurich 6th–9th February 1979. This was AIRMEC 79 — and, as was…

Abstract

This is our report on this first international assembly of Aircraft Maintenance and Engineering, held in Zurich 6th–9th February 1979. This was AIRMEC 79 — and, as was foreseen in our Comment in the January issue, the significance of this innovation among aviation occasions was taken up by thirty‐six countries who sent 276 delegates to the convention, which was supported by the Exhibition, attracting 112 exhibitors from 17 countries. There is every chance that this event will take its place with Farnborough, Paris and Cranfield as a regular feature of the aviation scene and of considerable interest to all engaged in aircraft maintenance. The organisers did announce at the end of that Show that AIRMEC 81 would take place, again in Zurich, in February of that year. And perhaps it is interesting to comment at this stage about the decision to return to Zurich. While it might be said that the event was a success, the fact that the convention was held in a venue separate from the Exhibition, did have some disadvantages and the consensus among the exhibitors was that this did discourage many of the 2260 in attendance from really taking in the Exhibition. Perhaps the only exception to this were the Chinese whose delegation spent almost all of every day in the Exhibition halls, visiting every stand and spending considerable time at each one.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1974

Aeronautical & General Instruments Ltd, will exhibit their R 128 recording cameras, designed to photograph the information displayed on the cathode ray tube of an aircraft

Abstract

Aeronautical & General Instruments Ltd, will exhibit their R 128 recording cameras, designed to photograph the information displayed on the cathode ray tube of an aircraft's reconnaissance radar.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1968

IN the two years since the last Farnborough Air Show was held by the Society of British Aerospace Companies the aircraft industry has achieved an almost complete…

Abstract

IN the two years since the last Farnborough Air Show was held by the Society of British Aerospace Companies the aircraft industry has achieved an almost complete metamorphosis from the body blows in the form of major programme cancellations that almost felled it in 1965 to the very healthy position that it holds today.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1971

On show for the first time, a new and unique super lightweight headset to be known as the Minilite will be the main feature of the Amplivox Communications stand at the Paris Salon.

Abstract

On show for the first time, a new and unique super lightweight headset to be known as the Minilite will be the main feature of the Amplivox Communications stand at the Paris Salon.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

I. T. Chondrou, G Mavrantonakis, N Tsagarakis, E Vergis, D Pangalos and T. G. Chondros

– The purpose of this paper is to study the main landing gear (MLG) mechanism configuration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the main landing gear (MLG) mechanism configuration.

Design/methodology/approach

Mechanism kinematics and dynamics, stress analysis and sizing of the MLG structural members, and fatigue issues related with the mechanism operation. Spreadsheet solutions were incorporated to this survey to analyze the most conceivable loading situations, and important factors of the mechanism design for an initial evaluation of safety implications.

Findings

MLG design approach along with conservative fatigue design factors lies in the area of accepted limits in commercial aircraft industry.

Research limitations/implications

MLG loading associated with landing as well as those associated with ground maneuvers (steering, braking and taxiing) contribute significantly to fatigue damage, along with the stresses induced by manufacturing processes and assembly. The application of FEA methods for the design of the landing gear does not always guarantee a successful approach to the problem solution, if precise analytical solutions are not available in advance.

Practical implications

From the investigation of this incident of fractured struts of the MLG it is confirmed that the reduction in Pintle Housing diameter on the upper part has contributed to the avoidance of damaging the fuel tank above the MLG that would lead to a catastrophic event. On the other hand, the airframe of the SKY-Jet was proved efficient for a belly landing with minor damages to the passengers and heavier damages for the aircraft.

Social implications

On-line vibration monitoring sensors hooked up to the landing gear strut and Pintle House would greatly enhance safety, without relying in optical surveys in hard to access and inspect areas of the landing gears mechanisms housings.

Originality/value

Analytic methods were adopted and spreadsheet solutions were developed for the MLG main loading situations, along with design issues concerning mechanism kinematics and dynamics, stress analysis and sizing of the MLG structural members, as well as fatigue issues related with the mechanism operation. Spreadsheet solutions were incorporated to this survey to analyze the most conceivable loading situations, and important factors of the mechanism design for an initial evaluation of safety implications.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1943

Alexander Klemin

THE eleventh annual meeting of the Institute was for the first time held simultaneously in three centres—in New York City at Columbia University, in Detroit at Rackham…

Abstract

THE eleventh annual meeting of the Institute was for the first time held simultaneously in three centres—in New York City at Columbia University, in Detroit at Rackham Educational Memorial, and in Los Angeles at the University of Southern California—from January 25 to 29. The purpose of the three simultaneous meetings was to minimize travel by executives and engineers from important war jobs in the present emergency. The same programme was offered at all three centres, papers being sometimes presented by proxies—experts in the same field as far as possible. In spite of the fact that attendance was divided between three centres, there was splendid representation at each place and a wide range of subjects was covered in the many papers. Naturally these were restricted more to analysis, and technology and information as to the latest design or production features of current aircraft or engines was withheld. The same ban applied to striking developments in accessories, instruments and armaments. All papers had to be approved by the Army or Navy and to be read substantially as written. While off‐the‐record discussions were permitted, these discussions were not made public. In particular there was a ban on comparisons between foreign and American materials, equipment or methods. The formula for control of comparison performance stated that the manufacturer's smooth curve calibrations and performance figures might be quoted, but no Wright field performance figures or data could be revealed. In spite of such restrictions a tremendous amount of valuable technical information was presented to the assembled engineers.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Al Arsh Basheer

Smart materials also called intelligent materials are gaining importance continuously in many industries including aerospace one. It is because of the unique features of…

Abstract

Purpose

Smart materials also called intelligent materials are gaining importance continuously in many industries including aerospace one. It is because of the unique features of these materials such as self-sensing, self-adaptability, memory capabilities and manifold functions. For a long time, there is no review of smart materials. Therefore, it is considered worthwhile to write a review on this subject.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough search of the literature was carried out through SciFinder, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, Wiley Online Library and reputed and peer-reviewed journals. The literature was critically analyzed and a review was written.

Findings

This study describes the advances in smart materials concerning their applications in aerospace industries. The classification, working principle and recent developments (nano-smart materials) of smart materials are discussed. Besides, the future perspectives of these materials are also highlighted. Much research has not been done in this area, which needs more extensive study.

Originality/value

Certainly, this study will be highly useful for academicians, researchers and technocrats working in aerospace industries.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 92 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

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