Search results

1 – 10 of 14
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Tariq Al-Shbail and Aini Aman

Electronic government (e-government) is perceived as an effective tool to enhance accountability in public organizations. However, e-government implementation to enhance…

1242

Abstract

Purpose

Electronic government (e-government) is perceived as an effective tool to enhance accountability in public organizations. However, e-government implementation to enhance accountability is still unclear and involves many complex processes because of the multiple accountabilities disorder. The e-government elements that contribute to mitigate the disorders and dysfunctions of accountability relationships are still underdeveloped in the current literature. This paper aims to provide understanding on how e-government enhances public organizations’ accountability by highlighting the key elements of e-government that mitigate the disorders and dysfunctions of accountability relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative case study approach by using the case of Jordan Customs. Data were collected using a triangulation approach that involved semi-structured interviews, document reviews and observation.

Findings

The findings revealed that the e-government elements that mitigate the disorders and dysfunctions of accountability relationships are classified into three contexts, namely, technological, environmental and organizational aspects. The technological elements include systems integration, single window and electronic connectivity. The environmental elements embrace public participation and partnership council. The organizational elements comprise having well-defined strategic plan and risk management approach.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes and gives further insight into how to address the confusion, fuzziness and dysfunctions in accountability relationships existing in the literature by providing several success elements that mitigate the problematic of disorder between accountability relationships in public organizations. The paper highlights the need to investigate further elements, particularly, in the organizational context, to assist public organizations in improving their performance to enhance accountability in their operations.

Practical implications

This study provides guidelines for future e-government implementation strategy in public organizations, particularly, in the context of developing countries, as most of the recent studies of e-government in developing countries indicated that they are suffering from difficulty of managing e-government implementation to promote accountability successfully and are struggling with a lack of resources and experiences to handle this new trend of technology.

Originality/value

This study is of a significant value, as it is one of the preliminary studies that empirically extend the accountability dimensions suggested by Koppell (2005) with the key success elements of e-government that enhance accountability proposed by Heeks (1998b) and other current literature. This paper enriches the body of literature by providing some new key success elements of e-government that enhance accountability in public organizations. It also contributes to the expansion of the boundaries of knowledge by adding further interpretation on how these elements reduce the existing confusions and dysfunctions in accountability relationships.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Nori Yani Abu Talib, Radziah Abdul Latiff and Aini Aman

This paper aims to improve the understanding of the institutional pressures that shape the intention to adopt waqf accounting and reporting. The study seeks to answer two…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve the understanding of the institutional pressures that shape the intention to adopt waqf accounting and reporting. The study seeks to answer two research questions as follows: what are the challenges in the adoption of waqf accounting and reporting in waqf institutions; and how do institutional pressures influence the adoption of waqf reporting in Malaysia. Drawing on the work of DiMaggio and Powell and Scott of institutional theory, this paper provides empirical evidence of institutional pressures on the adoption of waqf reporting in Malaysia and the challenges faced in adopting waqf accounting and reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses qualitative research method with an explanatory case study approach. Data are collected through semi-structured interviews with the accountants of State Islamic Religious Council and Customs of Terengganu, an informal conversation with the Deputy Director of Accountant Generals Department of Malaysia and document reviews, mainly the Malaysian Accounting Standard Board Research paper.

Findings

The findings show that coercive pressure such as government regulation contributes to challenges in the adoption of waqf accounting and reporting. Normative pressures contribute to challenges in formulating standardised waqf accounting and reporting, whereas mimetic pressure contributes to challenges in the comparability of the waqf accounting and reporting among the state Islamic religious councils in Malaysia. In the efforts towards the standardisation of waqf accounting and reporting practice, a similarity of the process of the standard implementation or the institutional isomorphism of the State Islamic Religious Council in Terengganu is strongly influenced from the result of the mandate of its Board members and Fatwa council members (coercive isomorphism and religion logic) and minor influence from the normative isomorphism (the result of the participants’ education and profession) as well as the result of imitating other State of Islamic Religious Councils (SIRCs) because of the ambiguity of the process or certain practice.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the knowledge by extending institutional theory and the possible role of religion logic in Islamic perspective to organisational behaviour and accounting development in SIRCs. This study is limited to the understanding of the challenges in the adoption of waqf accounting and reporting but could also be applicable to the adoption of other accounting standards or regulations.

Practical implications

This paper offers key implications for research, in improving the understanding of contextual factors and decision to adopt waqf accounting and reporting. The standard setter needs to be aware of the influence of contextual factors that shape decision towards standardisation of accounting and reporting for waqf.

Originality/value

The interplay of institutional pressures and implications of religion logic provides an interesting approach to understanding the waqf institutions’ intention to adopt accounting and reporting for waqf.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Ruhanita Maelah, Zakiah Muhammaddun Mohamed, Rosiati Ramli and Aini Aman

This study utilises an internship framework to justify the need for feedback from all three groups of internship stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to determine…

2417

Abstract

Purpose

This study utilises an internship framework to justify the need for feedback from all three groups of internship stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to determine the benefits, skills, and outcomes students gained through internships from the perspective of students, university and employers.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of structured questionnaires was used to survey the perceptions of students, university and employers of an accounting internship. A total of 172 responses were analysed.

Findings

Findings show that all three groups of stakeholders perceived that students benefit from the internship programme. They also perceived that an internship provides the students with both the technical and soft skills required in the marketplace. However, the mean score and ranking differ among the students, university and employers.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted based on feedback on a single accounting programme. Therefore any characteristics inherent in this sample that differ from the overall population of accounting programmes could bias the results and limit its generalisability and any associated inferences. Questionnaire responses should be interpreted with caution as perceptions and self-insights are subjective and may or may not be reflective of reality. This study falls short of putting forward any reasons why results differ from previous studies or why the mean scores of the three stakeholders all differ. Further research may take into consideration a comparison of internship programmes across institutions and disciplines. Future studies can also use the reflection approach and interview to better explain the benefits and skills developed through accounting internship programmes.

Practical implications

Practically, findings from this study provide feedback to the students, university and employers to continuously improve accounting internship for undergraduate accounting programmes.

Social implications

Social implications lie within the research framework that emphasises the student learning experience, university support through theoretical understanding and employer contribution through the practical component.

Originality/value

Internships have become part of an accounting curriculum in many universities globally. To date, most studies on internship practices are limited in scope and focus on feedback from a single perspective. This study fills the gap in the literature by conducting a perception-based survey of internship stakeholders: students, university and employers, on benefits and skills acquired through internship.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Aini Aman, Noradiva Hamzah, Rozita Amiruddin and Ruhanita Maelah

Finance and accounting (FA) offshore outsourcing is a growing trend involving a relocation of business processes to Asia but only few studies focus on understanding the…

1903

Abstract

Purpose

Finance and accounting (FA) offshore outsourcing is a growing trend involving a relocation of business processes to Asia but only few studies focus on understanding the issues that underlie the relocation of FA services. This paper aims to provide understanding of transaction costs economics (TCE) issues in FA offshore outsourcing using a case study of the Malaysia outsourcing industry which is growing and experiencing significant change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative case study approach. Interviews cover several foreign firms, which are based in Malaysia and involved in FA offshore outsourcing services worldwide. Interviews also include related regulatory bodies in Malaysia.

Findings

Using TCE and management control theoretical framework, findings indicate issues and challenges faced by the firms and the need for contract management skills to mitigate the issues.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to a broad discussion of FA offshore outsourcing, TCE and contract management but it could be a basis for future studies on specific issues of managing attrition in FA offshore outsourcing. This study contributes to prior works in TCE and FA offshore outsourcing by establishing controls to minimise costs at contact, contract and control stage. Specifically, this study emphasises contract management such as negotiating contract and using long‐term contractual arrangement.

Practical implications

This study not only identifies TCE issues in offshore FA outsourcing, but also provides suggestions for minimising transaction costs. For example, firms should consider the type of transaction costs involved and plan for appropriate contract management to mitigate the costs.

Originality/value

There is no study yet that discusses in‐depth the issues of TCE in FA offshore outsourcing especially in Malaysia and the need for contract management in mitigating such issues.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Sofiah, Auzair, Aini Aman, Ruhanita Maelah, Rozita Amiruddin and Noradiva Hamzah

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of accounting outsourcing practices in Malaysia and the management control strategies undertaken by these practising firms…

14755

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of accounting outsourcing practices in Malaysia and the management control strategies undertaken by these practising firms to mitigate inherent risks.

Design /methodology/approach

This study employs survey methodology using structured questionnaires and case studies using interviews. A total of 51 companies responded to the questionnaires and two companies participated in the interview.

Findings

The survey data revealed that the primary reason for engaging in accounting outsourcing was to gain quality accounting service from the experts. With regard to management control strategies, it was shown that respondents place high emphasis of behavior, output and social controls. Further investigation using case studies involving a vendor and client companies reveal that the control mechanisms involved were stated in the outsourcing contract, namely the use of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and penalties. Informal controls were also used in both cases to assist in solving conflicts and dissatisfaction among vendors and clients.

Research limitations/implications

The identification the control strategies in the accounting outsourcing process is useful for companies to manage the inherent risks in outsourcing relationships. The knowledge on the control practices by firms involved in accounting outsourcing provides additional assurance to potentials interested in seeking accounting services in this country.

Originality/value

This paper is driven by the lack of empirical evidence of accounting outsourcing practices in Malaysia and paucity of research into the role of management control in an outsourcing relationship. Despite the growth of the outsourcing industry in Malaysia, little has been done to understand the contribution of a professional service sector such as the accounting services to this industry.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Rozita Amiruddin, Aini Aman, Sofiah, Auzair, Noradiva Hamzah and Ruhanita Maelah

A shared service (SS) arrangement involves an intra‐firm interrelationship, since the SS centre (SSC), operated as an independent business unit, provides services to…

1496

Abstract

Purpose

A shared service (SS) arrangement involves an intra‐firm interrelationship, since the SS centre (SSC), operated as an independent business unit, provides services to clients who are other independent business units in the same company group. The purpose of this study is to provide an understanding of risks and controls used in mitigating SS risks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative approach using a case study of a SSC in a bank group in Malaysia. The risks and control framework developed by Das and Teng was used to analyse the appropriate control mechanisms for mitigating internal outsourcing risks, namely relational risk and performance risk.

Findings

The main relational risk identified is the possibility of opportunistic behaviour. However, this risk could be mitigated through social control especially when both parties share norms and values. Performance risks in SSC are mainly related to unsatisfactory services in terms of incomplete information, system errors and human mistakes. These risks could be mitigated using either behaviour control or output control. Behaviour control can be exercised through performance reporting, while output control can be achieved through key performance indicators (KPIs) and service level agreements (SLA).

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to a single case study of a SSC with a certain type of arrangement and discusses business process outsourcing (BPO) in general. Future research may examine cases with other SS arrangements, detailed examination of each BPO and incorporate multi‐perspective views from both SSC and their clients. Issues concerning changes in control in the evolving situation of SSC and bargaining power and trust in mitigating SSC risks are also worth exploring.

Practical implications

The study's findings enable practitioners to draw insights to develop effective control strategies to mitigate risks in intra‐organizational relationships such as SSC.

Originality/value

The paper adds to our knowledge of control mechanisms for mitigating risks in the SS relationship, which is a relatively new concept in the literature.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Ruhanita Maelah, Aini Aman, Rozita Amirruddin, Sofiah, Auzair and Noradiva Hamzah

Firms in Malaysia are in an enviable position in view of Malaysia's standing as a leading outsourcing hub in the region. Despite that, little is known about the accounting…

6459

Abstract

Purpose

Firms in Malaysia are in an enviable position in view of Malaysia's standing as a leading outsourcing hub in the region. Despite that, little is known about the accounting outsourcing practices, risks and control in Malaysia. This paper aims to explore the practices, decisions, processes and perception of risks and control in accounting outsourcing.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is written based on survey data which were collected using a questionnaire. The questionnaires were directed to the head of the accounts and finance department of each company. A total of 51 companies participated in this study and approximately 47.1 percent of the respondents are involved in accounting outsourcing.

Findings

Findings show that the most common outsourcing activities are financial reporting and auditing while the main reasons to outsource are quality service, core competencies and scale economies. The decision to outsource accounting services is related to the type of industry and expertise in the firms. Most of the firms outsource their preparation of account and audit work as well as tax for better quality services. Firms rely more on formal contracts and concerns about confidentiality and security of accounting data.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the limited number of responses, the findings may not be generalized to the overall population. Nevertheless, they can be used as background information for subsequent research in accounting outsourcing activities. Future research may consider the use of in‐depth case studies for understanding challenges in accounting outsourcing particularly in making decisions, managing processes and mitigating risks.

Originality/value

While it can be regarded as exploratory, this study makes an attempt to uncover the risks and control issues in accounting outsourcing. The findings will contribute to the body of knowledge in accounting outsourcing and enhance the understanding of the current accounting outsourcing practices in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Ruhanita Maelah, Aini Aman, Noradiva Hamzah, Rozita Amiruddin, Sofiah and Auzair

The purpose of this paper is to provide understanding on the process of accounting outsourcing turnback from the client's perspective. The aim is to understand the issues…

3289

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide understanding on the process of accounting outsourcing turnback from the client's perspective. The aim is to understand the issues faced by clients during turnback process, and provide recommendations to resolve them.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative interpretive case study approach. Data were collected based on documentation, archival records, direct observation, and interviews to allow for triangulation.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence of accounting outsourcing turnback process. Some of the issues faced by clients include lack of management support, limited financial and human resources, and uncooperative vendors.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, this study extends Elliot's model by providing empirical evidence on process, identifying issues, and discussing recommendations on accounting outsourcing turnback. The limitation is the use of a single case study of a small company in Malaysia.

Practical implications

Practically, this study enhances understanding on accounting outsourcing turnback process and issues. The recommendations provided can serve as guidelines for clients who are considering outsourcing turnback as a strategic move.

Originality/value

There has been limited research in the area of accounting outsourcing focusing on turnback process. This study contributes to the field of accounting outsourcing by describing an accounting turnback process and issues faced by clients. The study recommends communication, financial support, top management support, back‐up exit plan, and vendor management throughout the turnback period. Finally, gradual reduction of accounting outsourced works rather than immediate termination is favored to reduce the risk in accounting outsourcing turnback.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Aini Aman and Hasmiah Kasimin

Many countries worldwide have identified e‐procurement as a priority of e‐government agenda and have implemented, or are in the process of implementing, e‐procurement…

7582

Abstract

Purpose

Many countries worldwide have identified e‐procurement as a priority of e‐government agenda and have implemented, or are in the process of implementing, e‐procurement systems. The purpose of this paper is to understand the challenges of e‐procurement implementation in the government sector and efforts taken to overcome the challenges, using a Malaysia government case.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative case study approach of an e‐procurement project, which is one of Malaysia's e‐government initiatives. Data were collected using a triangulation approach that involved semi‐structured interviews, document reviews and observation.

Findings

The theoretical framework draws on Croom and Brandon‐Jones and was further developed during data analysis. Findings show that challenges of e‐procurement implementation in government sector are not only related to software integration, data management and roll‐out strategy, but also to legal and administration procedures, information technology (IT) infrastructure, outsourcing contract and IT skills. Findings show the importance of creating an IT facilities centre in rural areas and working closely with a third‐party vendor for users' training and skills development.

Research limitations/implications

The findings extend key issues of e‐procurement implementation using a case study in the Malaysia government. The paper highlights the need to understand challenges and limitations faced by a developing countries such as Malaysia in implementing e‐government projects. The paper provides a basis for further thought and analysis on important issues such as lack of IT infrastructure and skills, as well as high dependency on third‐party developers that needs to be overcome in order to gain the impact of an e‐procurement system.

Practical implications

This paper has explored implementation issues of e‐procurement in government sectors, particularly in developing countries, and hence provides guidelines for future implementation strategy for system developers, government officials and ministry.

Originality/value

Only limited studies examine the implementation issues of e‐procurement in the government sector, especially in developing countries. While current studies focus more on the readiness of implementing e‐procurement, this study posits to understand the challenges faced by a developing country in e‐procurement implementation.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Brian Nicholson and Aini Aman

Managing attrition is a major challenge for outsourcing vendors. Literature on management control in offshore outsourcing is dominated by the formal approaches to control…

1069

Abstract

Purpose

Managing attrition is a major challenge for outsourcing vendors. Literature on management control in offshore outsourcing is dominated by the formal approaches to control design, which do not adequately consider the influence of contextual factors. This article aims to adopt the lens of institutional theory, and use empirical data gathered from case studies in both the UK and India to improve the understanding of the institutional logics that shape the control of attrition.

Design/methodology/approach

This article draws on in‐depth qualitative research undertaken with directors and senior managers in client and vendor firms engaged in outsourcing relationships that span both corporate and national boundaries. Drawing on empirical data from the UK and India, the interplay between the management control of attrition and contextual factors is analysed, and the practices adopted to manage these contextual factors are also identified and discussed.

Findings

The analysis presents relevant aspects of the regulative, normative and cognitive institutions inhabited by vendor firms and the challenges such aspects present for managing attrition. The dynamics of institutions and control are discussed in the area of attrition, and the interplay between institutions and control is outlined. The regulative, normative and cognitive institutions inhabited by vendor firms contrast markedly to that of the client in relation to social and legal rules, norms and practices.

Research limitations/implications

The paper develops a theoretical basis for linking control and context in offshore outsourcing, drawing on the work of Scott in institutional theory, and Friedland and Alford, in institutional logics. This paper offers an alternative conceptualisation of control in attrition based upon rationalistic modelling through institutional logics.

Practical implications

This paper offers key implications for research, in improving the understanding of contextual factors and management control in global outsourcing relationships. Both clients and vendors in offshore outsourcing need to be aware of the influence of contextual factors when managing attrition.

Originality/value

The interplay of institutional logics and implications on the control of attrition provides an interesting approach to understanding how firms manage attrition in offshore outsourcing.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

1 – 10 of 14