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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2018

Guro Øyen Huby, Ailsa Cook and Ralf Kirchhoff

Partnership working across health and social care is considered key to manage rising service demand whilst ensuring flexible and high-quality services. Evidence suggests…

Abstract

Purpose

Partnership working across health and social care is considered key to manage rising service demand whilst ensuring flexible and high-quality services. Evidence suggests that partnership working is a local concern and that wider structural context is important to sustain and direct local collaboration. “Top down” needs to create space for “bottom up” management of local contingency. Scotland and Norway have recently introduced “top down” structural reforms for mandatory partnerships. The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare these policies to consider the extent to which top-down approaches can facilitate effective partnerships that deliver on key goals.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compare Scottish (2015) and Norwegian (2012) reforms against the evidence of partnership working. The authors foreground the extent to which organisation, finance and performance management create room for partnerships to work collaboratively and in new ways.

Findings

The two reforms are held in place by different health and social care organisation and governance arrangements. Room for manoeuvre at local levels has been jeopardised in both countries, but in different ways, mirroring existing structural challenges to partnership working. Known impact of the reforms hitherto suggests that the potential of partnerships to facilitate user-centred care may be compromised by an agenda of reducing pressure on hospital resources.

Originality/value

Large-scale reforms risk losing sight of user outcomes. Making room for collaboration between user and services in delivering desired outcomes at individual and local levels is an incremental way to join bottom up to top down in partnership policy, retaining the necessary flexibility and involving key constituencies along the way.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Emma Miller, Margaret Whoriskey and Ailsa Cook

There is currently much policy emphasis on both partnership working between health and social services in the UK and on the outcomes delivered by services. This article…

Abstract

There is currently much policy emphasis on both partnership working between health and social services in the UK and on the outcomes delivered by services. This article provides an account of two consecutive projects centred on these two themes. The first project, at the University of Glasgow, sought to address the lack of evidence about the outcomes delivered to service users by partnerships. Following from this project, the Joint Improvement Team of the Scottish Government commissioned the researchers to develop a toolkit to involve users and unpaid carers in performance management in community care in Scotland. The remit of this second project expanded during 2007 as it became linked with the development of the emerging National Outcomes Framework for community care in Scotland. This article outlines the outcomes‐based piloting work currently under way in Scotland.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2007

Ailsa Cook, Alison Petch, Caroline Glendinning and Jon Glasby

Successful development of health and social care partnerships is contingent on the contribution of all stakeholder groups to overcome the ‘wicked’ issues that beset the…

Abstract

Successful development of health and social care partnerships is contingent on the contribution of all stakeholder groups to overcome the ‘wicked’ issues that beset the field. This article explores four key issues, identified by a network of diverse stakeholders as vital to the future of health and social care partnerships, and proposes ways in which individuals and organisations from all stakeholder groups can support health and social care organisations to work together to deliver good outcomes to service users and their carers.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Alison Petch, Ailsa Cook and Emma Miller

Policy and practice documents are increasingly adopting a focus on outcomes. This article seeks to clarify what is meant by the term ‘outcome’, the outcomes that have been…

Abstract

Policy and practice documents are increasingly adopting a focus on outcomes. This article seeks to clarify what is meant by the term ‘outcome’, the outcomes that have been highlighted in key policy documents, and the extent to which they reflect the outcomes prioritised by service users. The discussion will draw on the early stages of a DoH‐funded project exploring the effectiveness of health and social care partnerships from the perspectives of service users.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Ailsa Cook, John Harries and Guro Huby

The purpose of this paper is to consider how postgraduate education can contribute to the effective integration of health and social care through supporting public service…

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236

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how postgraduate education can contribute to the effective integration of health and social care through supporting public service managers to develop the skills required for collaborative working.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of documentation from ten years of delivery of a part-time postgraduate programme for health and social care managers, critical reflection on the findings in light of relevant literature.

Findings

The health and social care managers participating in this postgraduate programme report working across complex, shifting and hidden boundaries. Effective education for integration should: ground learning in experience; develop a shared language; be inter-professional and co-produced; and support skill development.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in the literature relating to the educational and development needs of health and social care managers leading collaborative working.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Peter Thistlethwaite

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Jon Glasby, Robin Miller and Sue White

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134

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

National Health Service cooks and trainee cooks have been competing in the 1985 Flour Advisory Bureau 60p Menu Challenge, and recently the winners of the competition were…

Abstract

National Health Service cooks and trainee cooks have been competing in the 1985 Flour Advisory Bureau 60p Menu Challenge, and recently the winners of the competition were announced.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 85 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Pearse McCusker, Gillian MacIntyre, Ailsa Stewart and Jackie Jackson

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of user and carer involvement in a new one‐year postgraduate certificate course for Mental Health Officers…

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551

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of user and carer involvement in a new one‐year postgraduate certificate course for Mental Health Officers (MHOs) in Scotland, covering the first year of its delivery (2009‐2010).

Design/methodology/approach

This was explored in two ways: first, by assessing the level of user and carer involvement against a modified framework; and second, by measuring students' confidence in working with people with mental health issues over the duration of the course, and through interviews with students and service users and documentary analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate user and carer “influence” and “partnership” over the design and delivery of the learning, teaching and assessment strategy, but no degree of “control” over any aspect of the course. Teaching provided by users and carers was associated with marked improvement in students' confidence in engaging with and upholding the rights of users and carers in the context of the MHO role. Students reported increased awareness of the lived reality of compulsory treatment. Users reported benefits from feeling they had helped facilitate future good practice.

Research limitations/implications

The research design does not allow for causal links to be made between increases in student confidence and user and carer involvement.

Practical implications

The study identified substantial barriers to effective user and carer involvement but confirmed its potential as a positive change agent for post‐qualifying social work education.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the evidence base by demonstrating the value of service user and carer involvement in post qualifying social work education.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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