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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Siobhan Fox, Niamh O'Connor, Johnathan Drennan, Suzanne Guerin, W. George Kernohan, Aileen Murphy and Suzanne Timmons

The Model for Dementia Palliative Care Project will develop a service-delivery model for community-based dementia palliative care. Many countries provide dementia…

Abstract

Purpose

The Model for Dementia Palliative Care Project will develop a service-delivery model for community-based dementia palliative care. Many countries provide dementia palliative care services, albeit with considerable variability within these. However, little is known about what service providers consider to be the most important components of a dementia palliative care model. This study aimed to address this knowledge gap.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory design using a survey method was used as an initial phase of the wider project. A web-based survey was developed, piloted (n = 5), revised, and distributed within five healthcare jurisdictions: the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, England, Scotland, and Wales. The target population was health and social care professionals, policymakers, and academics interested in dementia and palliative care. Content analysis of open-ended questions identified common themes; descriptive statistics were applied to the closed-ended questions.

Findings

Overall, N = 112 complete surveys were received. Key care principles incorporated the philosophies of palliative care and dementia care; many described “holistic” and “person-centred care” as the core. Important individual service components were the support for carers, advanced care planning, information, education and training, activities for “meaningful living”, comprehensive disease management, coordinated case management, and linking with community health services and social activities. Barriers included poor availability and organisation of healthcare services, stigma, misconceptions around dementia prognosis, insufficiently advanced care planning, and dementia-related challenges to care. Facilitators included education, carer support, and therapeutic relationships.

Originality/value

This study, as part of the larger project, will directly inform the development of a novel service delivery Model of Dementia Palliative Care for Ireland. The results can also inform service planning and design in other countries.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2018

Ann Kirby, Aileen Murphy and Colin Bradley

Internationally, healthcare systems are moving towards delivering care in an integrated manner which advocates a multi-disciplinary approach to decision making. Such an…

Abstract

Purpose

Internationally, healthcare systems are moving towards delivering care in an integrated manner which advocates a multi-disciplinary approach to decision making. Such an approach is formally encouraged in the management of Atrial Fibrillation patients through the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. Since the emergence of new oral anticoagulants switching between oral anticoagulants (OACs) has become prevalent. This case study considers the role of multi-disciplinary decision making, given the complex nature of the agents. The purpose of this paper is to explore Irish General Practitioners’ (GPs) experience of switching between all OACs for Arial Fibrillation (AF) patients; prevalence of multi-disciplinary decision making in OAC switching decisions and seeks to determine the GP characteristics that appear to influence the likelihood of multi-disciplinary decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

A probit model is used to determine the factors influencing multi-disciplinary decision making and a multinomial logit is used to examine the factors influencing who is involved in the multi-disciplinary decisions.

Findings

Results reveal that while some multi-disciplinary decision-making is occurring (64 per cent), it is not standard practice despite international guidelines on integrated care. Moreover, there is a lack of patient participation in the decision-making process. Female GPs and GPs who have initiated prescriptions for OACs are more likely to engage in multi-disciplinary decision-making surrounding switching OACs amongst AF patients. GPs with training practices were less likely to engage with cardiac consultants and those in urban areas were more likely to engage with other (non-cardiac) consultants.

Originality/value

For optimal decision making under uncertainty multi-disciplinary decision-making is needed to make a more informed judgement and to improve treatment decisions and reduce the opportunity cost of making the wrong decision.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Edel Walsh and Aileen Murphy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of having minor children on parents' life satisfaction. Given the demands on working parents in terms of their time and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of having minor children on parents' life satisfaction. Given the demands on working parents in terms of their time and financial resources, the authors suspect a complex interaction between employment and parenthood and explore the effect of parenthood on life satisfaction of mothers and fathers, working parents and those with children of various ages.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from three rounds of the European Social Survey (R3 2006/07, R5 2010/11 and R8 2016/17) are used to account for Ireland's changing economic landscape. Three ordered probit models are estimated examining parents, and mothers and fathers separately.

Findings

The findings indicate that any life satisfaction benefits derived from having children appear to be eroded for working parents. There is a negative association between life satisfaction for working mothers with child(ren) aged between 5 and 12 years. Furthermore, when both parents are working, mothers' life satisfaction is also significantly reduced.

Practical implications

Family policies and supports can shape the effects of parenthood on individual wellbeing and decisions regarding parenthood. Such policies need to be purposeful for working parents of school going children and consistent with economic strategy and labour market goals.

Originality/value

Much of the existing economic research on individual wellbeing and parenthood are focused on the fertility decision rather than examining the factors affecting the life satisfaction of different cohorts of parents thus leading to more targeted and informed policies. Contemporary weighting methodology is employed.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1960

OUR ISSUES DO NOT PROVE ANYTHING? “READING is finished” is the portentious quotation from Richard Hoggart's address to the School Libraries Association which we find in…

Abstract

OUR ISSUES DO NOT PROVE ANYTHING? “READING is finished” is the portentious quotation from Richard Hoggart's address to the School Libraries Association which we find in small type at the foot of a column of the American L.A. Bulletin. A year or two ago, with apprehension and gravity, an American writer asserted that one of the darker signs of life in the U.S.A. was that a generation had arrived that had lost not only the art but the willing power to read, or perhaps never had them to lose. The first American report we have opened this year is The Brooklyn Public Library Salutes its Readers, its 61st annual one. Mr. Francis R. St. John, the chief librarian, says in his first paragraph “this has been a record year” and continues, “This year readers were responsible for the greatest circulation in our history”. Yes, 9½ millions of it. The question occurs: if no one reads and books are finished, how can these statements and figures be reconciled?

Details

New Library World, vol. 61 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Seham Ghalwash, Ahmed Tolba and Ayman Ismail

This study aims to explore the characteristics and backgrounds of social entrepreneurs, particularly in relation to what motivates them to start new social ventures…

4809

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the characteristics and backgrounds of social entrepreneurs, particularly in relation to what motivates them to start new social ventures, through an empirical examination of the phenomenon of social entrepreneurship in the specific context of Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative methodological approach based on a triangulation of data sources, including extensive interviews from five social entrepreneurs, interviews with senior executives in their organisations and industry experts, as well as secondary data.

Findings

The paper proposes a model that integrates common characteristics and motivations among individuals who start social ventures. Findings confirm the characteristics of social entrepreneurs as compassionate risk-takers with entrepreneurial mindsets who seek to address social issues in innovative ways. They also have the perseverance to face the inefficient institutional frameworks prevalent in developing economies. Social entrepreneurs are motivated by social problems and challenges, inspiration, and previous personal experiences, as well as their social networks.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations pertaining to the limited sample size and single country focus.

Practical implications

This research offers useful and practical insights for current and future social entrepreneurs, particularly in developing economies. Moreover, the study contributes to expanding future research on social entrepreneurship in similar contexts.

Originality/value

This study makes several contributions to the literature on social entrepreneurship. First, by presenting an integrated model for the characteristics/traits and motivations of social entrepreneur. Second, it provides deeper understanding of social entrepreneurship in emerging economies. Third, it highlights the importance of personal inspiration and informal social networks as two sources of motivation for social entrepreneurs, in emerging countries.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2022

Laurence Ferry, Henry Midgley and Aileen Murphie

English local government audit has gone through fundamental change in the last decade and this period of instability looks certain to continue. Since 2014, councils have…

Abstract

English local government audit has gone through fundamental change in the last decade and this period of instability looks certain to continue. Since 2014, councils have been audited by private sector auditors appointed theoretically by the councils themselves (though an overwhelming majority of councils have delegated this responsibility). The scope of audit after 2014 reduced to focus mainly on top-down financial management, rather than value for money or inspection. After growing concerns about the scope and quality of audit however, in 2020, the government commissioned Sir Tony Redmond to review local audit arrangements in England. The Redmond review identified several problems with the reformed structure and made recommendations for change. Currently, the sector is uncertain about what changes will be adopted to solve the issues discovered by Redmond.

Details

Auditing Practices in Local Governments: An International Comparison
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-085-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Clare Holdsworth

The study of family mobilities necessitates an examination of how practices are orchestrated in time as well as space. Conventional approaches to the study of family time…

Abstract

The study of family mobilities necessitates an examination of how practices are orchestrated in time as well as space. Conventional approaches to the study of family time use either quantitative analysis of time-use data or qualitative studies of time pressure and work/life balance. The limitation with these approaches is that they assume a rather static family structure that is dominated by parents with young children. Moreover, these studies do not capture the dualistic quality of time; that time constitutes and is a constituent of family life. In this chapter, I use one-day diaries on organising and experiencing time, collated as part of the UK Mass Observation Project in Autumn 2017, to interrogate the relationality of family time. The analysis examines how family practices maybe sequential, synchronous, planned or serendipitous and how these different temporalities permeate the busyness of time pressure. These one-day accounts confirm how time is experienced through and by family and intimate relationships.

Details

Families in Motion: Ebbing and Flowing through Space and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-416-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Elaine Chan and Vicki Ross

We introduce this volume featuring the work of C. L. Clarke and D. A. Hutchinson with references to existing literature addressing complexities of teacher knowledge…

Abstract

We introduce this volume featuring the work of C. L. Clarke and D. A. Hutchinson with references to existing literature addressing complexities of teacher knowledge development. Drawing from their metaphor of the muskeg, we write about ways in which notions of teacher knowledge intersect with prior personal and professional experiences across time, place, and social interaction. Clarke and Hutchinson write about ways in which identities that they view as having developed at the edges of their communities have contributed to shaping their sense of professional and personal identity in profound ways. They examine the potential impact of these experiences in: shaping their research and the building of research relationships with their participants using a narrative inquiry approach; and developing ways in which the use of poetic expression and word images enriched their understanding of the development of teacher identity and knowledge and informed their curriculum making. A chapter written by their dissertation supervisor offers further insight into ways in which their use of a narrative inquiry approach shaped their research work and writing, and offered a unique glimpse into their research phenomenon. We position this work in relation to existing research in the area of teacher knowledge and highlight ways in which this work contributes to knowledge in the area, as well as contributing to ideas about how narrative inquiry methodology has informed the examination of their research phenomenon.

Abstract

Details

Narrative Conceptions of Knowledge: Towards Understanding Teacher Attrition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-138-1

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Aileen Fraser

As a practitioner working in the field of adult protection I became aware that, although the responses to reports of abuse have become more effective and consistent…

Abstract

As a practitioner working in the field of adult protection I became aware that, although the responses to reports of abuse have become more effective and consistent, access to treatment or therapy is limited. I therefore decided to explore the idea of using psychological approaches as interventions. My background is as a registered nurse and CAT (cognitive analytical therapy) practitioner. From some limited experience I have found that CAT can be a successful approach. In the course of this article I will examine the background to adult protection work in the UK, focusing on elder abuse, including self‐neglect, in domiciliary settings, to show the need to explore new approaches to treatment for both those who have been abused and those who are in the position of abuser. A selection of psychological therapies are explored to determine their potential to offer support for this group and the article concludes with examples of the use of CAT with adult protection referrals and a summary of the benefits and obstacles to this approach.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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