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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Aikaterini Makatouni

The aim of the overall project is to understand in depth the behavioural process of parents with respect to organic food. Its main objectives are to identify: beliefs…

26080

Abstract

The aim of the overall project is to understand in depth the behavioural process of parents with respect to organic food. Its main objectives are to identify: beliefs, with respect to organic food, of parents who buy and do not buy organic food; the positive as well as negative attitudes towards organic food of those who buy and do not buy organic food; the impact of those attitudes on food choice for parents who buy and do not buy organic food; and to model the food choice behaviour of parents with respect to organic food. Employs both qualitative and quantitative methods. Reports the results of the second qualitative phase of the project which involved 40 laddering interviews, which were conducted in Reading, UK. The means‐end chain approach was used. The key idea is that product attributes are a means for consumers to obtain desired ends. Participants were parents with children aged 4‐12 years old, who were responsible for food purchases in their families and belonged to ABC1 class. The life values which were revealed mainly fall into three main broad categories. Consumers’ human, animal and environment centred values form the key motivating factors for organic food purchase. Both laddering and focus group interviews have generated certain hypotheses that are tested through the quantitative phase of the project, which uses a sample survey.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Gemma C. Harper and Aikaterini Makatouni

This paper is derived from a larger scale project investigating consumer attitudes towards organic food in the UK. Presents focus group results on consumer perceptions…

44740

Abstract

This paper is derived from a larger scale project investigating consumer attitudes towards organic food in the UK. Presents focus group results on consumer perceptions, attitudes and behaviour in relation to two key interrelated food trends: organic food and animal welfare. The results indicate that consumers often confuse organic and free‐range products because they believe that “organic” is equivalent to “free‐range” food. Focus group discussions were conducted to identify the main beliefs and attitudes towards organic food of both organic and non‐organic food buyers. Results indicate that, although health and food safety concerns are the main motives for organic food purchases, ethical concerns, specifically in relation to standards of animal welfare, play a significant influencing role in the decision to purchase organic food. The results are consistent with parallel research into consumer concerns about animal welfare, which showed that consumers are primarily concerned about food safety issues. Furthermore, the research illustrates the central outcome that animal welfare is used by consumers as an indicator of other, more important product attributes, such as safety and the impact on health. Indeed, ethical considerations seem to motivate the purchase of organic food and free‐range products and, therefore, may be viewed as interrelated. However, such ethical frameworks are closely related, if not contingent upon, the quality of the product, which includes perceptions of higher standards of safety and healthiness. Based on the qualitative data, suggests that the organic market could take advantage of research on consumer motivation to buy free‐range products, by embodying ethical concerns as an indicator of product quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

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