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Abstract

Subject area

Strategic marketing/marketing management.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and post graduate courses in the principles of marketing, strategic marketing, strategic management, services marketing and hospitability management.

Case overview

This case focuses on the critical success factors of “Scandic” hotel chain by highlighting its road to becoming the leading hotel chain in the Baltic region. This case covers a wide range of situations in which strategic marketing decisions were made, for example, the Scandic Sustainability Fund, supporting initiatives to promote sustainable social development. Special attention is devoted to how the case company's business philosophy is implemented to identify and differentiate its customers, in order to sustain a customer centric strategy and develop long lasting relationships.

Expected learning outcomes

Following analysis of the case students should be able to: first, understand how marketing strategies can be utilized to effectively differentiate organizations from their competitors by capitalising on distinctive strengths, leading to the delivery of better value to stakeholders; second, understand how marketing strategy deals with the interplay of “the strategic three Cs” (customer, competition and corporation) in better satisfying customer needs; third, appreciate how companies operate within a given environment and the benefits of developing an environmental strategy.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note including lecture plan.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Jens Eklinder Frick, Vincent Hocine Jean Fremont, Lars-Johan Åge and Aihie Osarenkhoe

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the benefits and drawbacks that strategically imposed liminality inflicts upon inter-organizational digitalization efforts within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the benefits and drawbacks that strategically imposed liminality inflicts upon inter-organizational digitalization efforts within the different phases of its utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically examines digitalization in a large multinational manufacturing company, Sandvik Machining Solutions, using data that were collected through interviews and a qualitative research design.

Findings

This study shows that a liminal space separated from the structures in which one is supposed to inflict changes increases the risk of developing an incompatible system that will be rejected in the incorporation phase. An inter-organizational perspective on liminality thus contributes to our understanding of the benefits and drawbacks that liminal space can pose for the organizations involved.

Practical implications

The study suggests that, in the separation phase, driving change processes by creating liminal spaces could be a way to loosen up rigid resource structures and circumvent network over-embeddedness. Finding the right amount of freedom, ambiguity and community within the liminal space is, however, essential for the transition of information as well as the incorporation of the imposed changes.

Originality/value

Introducing an inter-organizational perspective on liminality contributes to our understanding of the stress that liminal space can place on individuals as well as the individual organization.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Vincent Hocine Jean Fremont, Jens Eklinder Frick, Lars-Johan Åge and Aihie Osarenkhoe

The purpose of this paper is to analyze friction and controversies with interaction processes and their effects on forming new resource interfaces, through the lens of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze friction and controversies with interaction processes and their effects on forming new resource interfaces, through the lens of boundary objects.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical setting consists of two organizations that are trying to enhance their competitive advantage through digitalization. During the process of data collection four different boundary objects were identified. The study illustrates how these boundary objects were characterized in terms of their modularity, standardization, abstractness and tangibility. This paper provides an analysis of how respondents perceived that the development of these boundary objects affected the creation of novel resource interfaces, and the resulting friction and controversy between new and old structures.

Findings

The study concludes that within a producer–user setting a focal boundary object will take on tangible and standardized properties, and the interaction process will expose friction in terms of both power struggles and resource incompatibilities. On the other hand, a boundary object’s modularity gives the actors central to the interaction room to maneuver and avoid resource incompatibilities and the development setting will hence be characterized by controversies.

Originality/value

The analysis indicates that the way individuals perceive boundary objects is central to interaction processes, answering calls for studies that investigate the role of objects within subject-to-object interaction.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Aihie Osarenkhoe

This paper contributes to extant knowledge by highlighting the complementarity‐based nature of coopetition strategy and its impact on collective strategies for value…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper contributes to extant knowledge by highlighting the complementarity‐based nature of coopetition strategy and its impact on collective strategies for value generation among actors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection draws on three cases encompassing three empirical contexts. A theoretical lens that enables a focus on contemporary inter‐organisational markets as organised behaviour systems manifesting network structures is adopted. Business strategy is operationalised as an exchange strategy with an emphasis on the exchange effectiveness achieved when some value is produced in cooperation with significant others.

Findings

The results show that managerial leadership and development of trust are the key success factors. Furthermore, this hybrid level of inter‐organisational relationship encompassing both competition and cooperation – coopetition – fosters collective intelligence through information and knowledge sharing.

Research limitations/implications

This paper concludes that, due to contemporary inter‐organisational exchange often being governed by the “visible hand” of the process of networking, today's environment is different from the environment firms used to encounter in the past. From a managerial perspective, the findings demonstrate the multifaceted nature of coopetition. Additional work on the impact of the concept of coopetition strategy on business practice is needed to add to this valuable endeavour.

Originality/value

The existing studies are primarily concerned with arm's‐length exchange (competition), a dynamic situation in which several actors are vying for scarce resources and/or producing and marketing similar products or services. Comparatively little research has focused on inter‐organisational dynamics, which entails both cooperation and competition. This paper demonstrates that participating in inter‐firm networks has become increasingly popular to enhance corporate entrepreneurship.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Article

Gabriel Baffour Awuah, Desalegn Abraha Gebrekidan and Aihie Osarenkhoe

The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an independent actor(s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an independent actor(s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to jointly determine the choice of market, the mode of entry and the level of investment committed in the market to be entered and even after the entry (i.e. the ongoing activities).

Design/methodology/approach

Against the previous purpose section, a qualitative research approach is selected to guide the exploratory nature of this study. Thus qualitative data are used to build the two case studies because case studies are generally a more appropriate approach when “how” and “why” questions are being posed and when the investigator has little control over events.

Findings

Based on two multiple case studies, one major finding of the study shows that independent actors, with their interconnected networks, have played and are still playing a major role in influencing the internationalization processes of each of the two firms in this study.

Originality/value

This is an original paper developed based on two case studies which have not been published in any journal before. The paper highlights the role of external independent actors in internationalization, which is not mentioned at all or stressed in the extant literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Aihie Osarenkhoe and Az‐Eddine Bennani

Efforts made in extant literature to link the components of customer relationship management (CRM) strategy to its implementation are insufficient. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Efforts made in extant literature to link the components of customer relationship management (CRM) strategy to its implementation are insufficient. This paper aims to provide insights on the core components of CRM and the implementation of CRM strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of CRM implementation at a large Swedish firm was carried out using open‐ended, face‐to‐face and telephone interview methods to collect data from key informants at both strategic and operative levels. The empirical studies focused on technical and cognitive aspects necessary for successful implementation of a sustainable CRM strategy.

Findings

Results show that relationships are not only a tactical weapon, but represent a different, strategic approach to buyer‐seller exchange. Findings also show that implementing sustainable CRM strategy requires the endorsement by and commitment from top management, systematic cross‐functional communication, and mandatory customer loyalty training programmes for all employees.

Research limitations/implications

Attempts made in extant literature to define CRM have been varied. A theoretical model on which future empirical analysis should be based when conceptualizing CRM should consist of a business strategy, a business philosophy and a database application, thereby forming a tripod.

Practical implications

CRM is a strategic business and process issue, not merely a technology solution as most often conceived in practice. The CRM process is a continuous learning process where information about individual customer is transformed into a customer relationship.

Originality/value

A process‐oriented integrative framework that facilitate successful implementation of a sustainable CRM strategy. It links components of CRM strategy with the key dimension of its implementation. The depth of the anchorage of this paper in the body of literature is a contribution.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Aihie Osarenkhoe

Is non‐sequential internationalization process solely technology enabled or a product of mutually interdependent forces? This paper aims to show that even though the…

Abstract

Purpose

Is non‐sequential internationalization process solely technology enabled or a product of mutually interdependent forces? This paper aims to show that even though the sequential approach in the process model is intuitively appealing, not all firms follow such a path. Hence, integrated framework to explain how the international market entry process has changed with respect to the sequential approach is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The data banks of the Swedish Trade Council and the Chambers of Commerce are used to identify small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) with between 50 and 250 employees (in compliance with European Union's definition of SMEs). Data are collected through the use of questionnaires and in‐depth interviews from 60 Swedish SMEs operating in other countries and foreign SMEs operating in Sweden that tends not to develop in incremental stages with respect to their international.

Findings

Some of the findings are: that the sequential model is by no means reflective of, or appropriate for all firms' approaches to international business; the usefulness gained by using an international network approach to study the international activity of a firm; and the interplay between the identified driving forces behind a non‐sequential internationalization process.

Research limitations/implications

Even though market entry patterns of firms investigated demonstrate a non‐sequential internationalization process, they are still within the general theoretical framework where the basic assumption of the sequential internationalization model can maintain its validity. Firms are indeed exposed to irrecoverable transaction costs that hamper their behaviours and complicate export supply responses in international markets. However, the magnitude of the costs and speed of internationalization is dependent on the ability of the firms to take advantage of the enablers of non‐sequential internationalization pattern. This is particularly important for firms to and from developing countries and emerging markets and their propensities to succeed in their internationalization endeavours.

Originality/value

Knowledge acquired from the empirical study of firms that tend not to develop in incremental stages with respect to their international activities, and therefore start international activities by entering very distant markets and multiple countries right from birth without prior experience, is used to develop an integrated framework which aptly depicts that non‐sequential internationalization process is not solely enabled by technology, as commonly envisaged in literature, but a product of mutually interdependent forces. Consequently, this study provides a holistic view on the driving forces behind the rapid internationalization process encountered by many SMEs today.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Mabel Komunda and Aihie Osarenkhoe

This paper aims to contribute to a growing body of service recovery knowledge by examining the relationship between service recovery, consumer satisfaction and loyalty in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to a growing body of service recovery knowledge by examining the relationship between service recovery, consumer satisfaction and loyalty in a commercial banking environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework encompassing th\e concepts of service recovery, communication, customer satisfaction and customer loyalty in the commercial bank setting is developed. A questionnaire is designed to focus on issues related to efforts made to investigate causes of service failure and to develop recovery strategies that meet customer expectations of how their banks should handle such problems.

Findings

Results show that communication had a significant relationship with service recovery and that higher levels of redress independently increase positive consumer responses. The findings also show that the interaction of employee responsiveness and courtesy can also have a positive impact on consumer evaluations. Satisfaction was highest and negative word‐of‐mouth intentions lowest only under conditions of high responsiveness and courtesy.

Research limitations/implications

Service recovery is process‐oriented, and does not assess whether the reported problem that led to the actual complaint has been resolved. This aspect of the study opens a number of directions for future research with the goal of increasing the still limited understanding of service recovery issues in commercial banks. To achieve an in‐depth view, a more comprehensive qualitative study that pursues the same research questions may be appropriate.

Practical implications

An implication is that, when managing complaints related to customer dissatisfaction, the approaches undertaken by service quality leaders should aim to provide just resolutions/fairness in service recovery. This study also provides insight into a company's customer relationship management practices. However, in order to encourage customers to complain directly, a company, if complained to, needs to enhance the perception of a possible outcome.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework is developed and used to investigate the relationship between service recovery, consumer satisfaction and loyalty.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Aihie Osarenkhoe and Akmal Hyder

A review of extant literatures shows that most mergers fail during the integration process. Little is known about how the realization of operating synergies and…

Abstract

Purpose

A review of extant literatures shows that most mergers fail during the integration process. Little is known about how the realization of operating synergies and dissemination of available know-how in the merged firm are managed in the post-merger phase. The purpose of this paper is to provide insights on the process of integrating operating synergies by focusing on the critical success factors that facilitate integration of the skills of merged banks.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on three research traditions in merger literature and reconcile them with three dimensions of integration. In-depth interviews were conducted with Nordea managers from four Nordic countries.

Findings

Having learned from the mistakes of previous mergers, Nordea’s “guiding star” for managing its post-merger integration process was expressed as focus, speed and performance from top management. A hands-on leadership style, vision-led thinking, a bias for action, involvement of the entire staff, continuous focus on customers, open and honest communication with employees are critical to success.

Practical implications

The motive for a merger has an important impact on the degree of interaction and degree of integration. The authors expand on previous findings by, among other things, synthesizing three theoretical lenses into an integrative model, and addresses post-merger issues with a sharp eye towards clear managerial relevance.

Originality/value

The authors respond to the call to expand inter-firm relationships study beyond the narrow dyadic relationship focus and not solely conceptualize mergers as one of companies’ entry modes to implement mechanistic growth strategy. The three dimensions of integration imbued with three research traditions in merger literature provides us with a conceptual lens to conceive mergers also as engines for change emerging from the merged firms to enhance a bespoke performance of their business process.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Arun Kumar Tarofder, Seyed Rajab Nikhashemi, S.M. Ferdous Azam, Prashantini Selvantharan and Ahasanul Haque

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of explanation on customer satisfaction in the service failure stage. It seeks to better understand the dynamics of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of explanation on customer satisfaction in the service failure stage. It seeks to better understand the dynamics of consumer repurchase intention through a mediating effect of customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was e-mailed to collect the primary data. With three reminders, this study managed to obtain 322 responses from customers who complained about their internet service in Malaysia. Structural equation modelling techniques were applied to examine both direct and mediating effects between variables.

Findings

Results reveal that all four dimensions of explanation have significant partial mediating effect on repurchase intention through customer satisfaction. Results also disclose that there is no significant relationship between excuse and customer satisfaction in service failure. Among all dimensions, reference and apology have higher influence on repurchase intention through customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The results are particularly valuable for managers, as it supports the role of using explanation as a practical tool for fostering positive and profitable outcomes like repeat customer purchases.

Practical implications

The findings of this study will help organisations rethink their explanation strategies with the eye to foster greater customer repurchase intention.

Originality/value

The results are particularly valuable for managers, as they support the role of using explanation as a practical tool for fostering positive and profitable outcomes like repeat customer purchases.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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