Search results

1 – 5 of 5
Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Laura Gasiorowski and Ahreum Lee

This study aims to show what type of directors founders (or entrepreneurs) first appoint to the board and how these appointments differ across experienced and novice entrepreneurs.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to show what type of directors founders (or entrepreneurs) first appoint to the board and how these appointments differ across experienced and novice entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of the human capital of board members in 443 new ventures in the computer software and information technology industries between 2000 and 2014. The hypotheses were tested using tobit regression.

Findings

The findings in this study reveal that compared to novice entrepreneurs, experienced entrepreneurs tend to appoint early boards with greater human capital (entrepreneurial, technical/scientific and industry-specific) and with greater functional diversity. In contrast, novice entrepreneurs tend to appoint early boards with greater finance and director experience.

Originality/value

The value of this research lies in filling the gap in the current literature by comparing the board appointment/selection behavior of novice and experienced entrepreneurs, which is relatively underexplored.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2071-1395

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Ahreum Lee, Ram Mudambi and Marcelo Cano-Kollmann

In the modern knowledge-intensive economy, a nation’s competitiveness depends on the ability of its constituent firms to innovate. Extant research in national systems of…

Abstract

Purpose

In the modern knowledge-intensive economy, a nation’s competitiveness depends on the ability of its constituent firms to innovate. Extant research in national systems of innovation highlights institutions and public policies toward innovation as key determinants that affect firms’ innovation activities. This paper aims to widen the investigation by arguing that co-inventor connectivity allows firms to access the most tacit knowledge within global innovation systems. Therefore, it is one of the key factors that underpin a nation’s ability to develop and sustain its competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a data set of 406,168 patents from US Patent and Trademark Office during the period of 1975-2004, this study analyzed the Japanese system of innovation through co-inventor networks.

Findings

Surprisingly, the authors found that compared to other advanced countries such as Germany and Denmark, the Japanese innovation system is quite closed.

Originality/value

The dimension of tacit knowledge is crucial in the current environment of rapid cycle time, short product lifespans and increasing emphasis on exploratory innovation. Hence the authors speculate that closedness to global innovation systems could be one of the reasons why many of Japan’s traditionally powerful multinational enterprises exhibit weak performance in recent years.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Ahreum Lee and Hokyoung Ryu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how people differently create meaning from photos taken by either a lifelogging camera (LC) (i.e. automatic capture) or a mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how people differently create meaning from photos taken by either a lifelogging camera (LC) (i.e. automatic capture) or a mobile phone camera (MC) (i.e. manual capture). Moreover, the paper investigates the different changes in the interpretative stance of lifelog photos and manually captured photos over time to figure out how the LC application could support the users’ iconological interpretation of their past.

Design/methodology/approach

A 200-day longitudinal study was conducted with two different user groups that took and reviewed photos taken by either a LC or a MC. The study was structured in two phases: a photo collection phase, which lasted for five days (Day 1‒Day 5), and a three-part semi-structured interview phase, which was conducted on Days 8, 50 and 200.

Findings

Results revealed that the interpretative stance of the LC group changed greatly compared to the MC group that kept a relatively consistent interpretative stance over time. A significant difference between the two groups was revealed on Day 200 when the lifelog photos provoked a more iconological and less pre-iconographical interpretative stance. This stance allowed the viewers of lifelog photos to systemically interpret the photos and look back upon their past with different viewpoints that were not recognized before.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to further understand the dynamic change in interpretative stance of lifelog photos compared to manually captured photos through a longitudinal study. The results of this study can support the design guidelines for a LC application that could give opportunities for users to create rich interpretations from lifelog photos.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Yonjoo Cho, Jiwon Park, Soo Jeoung “Crystal” Han, Boreum Ju, Jieun You, Ahreum Ju, Chan Kyun Park and Hye Young Park

The purpose of this study was to compare South Korean female executives’ definitions of career success with those of male executives, identify their career development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to compare South Korean female executives’ definitions of career success with those of male executives, identify their career development strategies for success and provide implications for research and practice. Two research questions guiding our inquiry included: How do female executives’ definitions of career success differ from those of male executives? What career development strategies do male and female executives use for career success?

Design/methodology/approach

A basic qualitative research design was used and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 male executives and 15 female executives in diverse corporations by using an interview protocol of 13 questions regarding participants’ background, definitions of career success and final thoughts. To analyze the interview data, we used both NVivo 11 and a manual coding method.

Findings

Gender differences were detected in the participants’ definitions of career success and success factors. As previous studies indicated, male and female executives had different perspectives on career success: men tended to define career success more objectively than women. Many male executives, through experiencing transforming changes in their careers, began to appreciate work–life balance and personal happiness from success. Gender differences were also detected in their career development challenges, meanings of mentors and networking activities. While work stress surfaced as a challenge that men faced, experiencing the token status in the gendered workplace was a major challenge for female participants.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, three research agendas are presented, needing further investigation on career success, women’s token status and comparative analyses.

Practical implications

Three implications for practice have been provided, including organizational support, government’s role and HRD’s role.

Originality/value

Gender differences in this study were not as distinctive as previous literature has indicated. Some male executives valued more subjective career success than others, while a few female executives spoke of more objective definitions than others. These subtle differences could be captured through in-depth interviews. By hearing the participants’ stories, both objective and subjective definitions of success, for both genders, could be observed, which might not have been possible in quantitative research. In addition, the study findings reflect the nature of a uniquely Korean context. The participants worked in a Confucian and military culture, which operates in hierarchical structures and the command and control system, coupled with a heightened camaraderie spirit in the workplace.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Backhoon Song and Ahreum Oh

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of the duration of free trade agreement (FTA) and bilateral investment treaty (BIT) on the foreign direct investment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of the duration of free trade agreement (FTA) and bilateral investment treaty (BIT) on the foreign direct investment (FDI) flows between OECDs and different level of income countries such as upper- and lower-middle-income countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied the gravity model by adding more variables of interest such as trade openness, export volume, dummy and cumulative variables of FTA and BIT to find out the proper determinants of FDI attraction. Through Hasuman test, the authors find the fixed model is appropriate methodology. Hence, the authors basically use the fixed models to find the effect of the duration of FTA and BIT on FDI flows between different groups of countries.

Findings

The main results of the study are briefly summarized briefly as follows. First, the effects of FTA dummy variables and its cumulative variables are greater than those of BIT dummy variables and cumulative variables. If an FTA signifies attracting FDI as well as bilateral trade, and contains an investment agreement provision in it is included in the FTA, it can be seen that the FTA is more effective way of attracting FDI than BIT because FTA is more comprehensive agreement dealing with not only investment issues but also non-investment ones. Second, the BIT effect on FDI is only meaningful when developed countries invest in developing countries. In other words, when a country decides to invest in a developing country with a relatively poor investment environment, whether to enter into a BIT will provide investors with investment stability to gage the investment climate of the host country. Third, the BIT cumulative year effect showed a positive and significant results on FDI inflow and outflow of all cases, unlike the BIT effect. While the fact that BIT cumulative effect has a relatively less positive effect than the BIT dummy effect, implying that BIT effect was evident as time elapsed after fermentation.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is that we consider the duration of FTA and BIT explicitly in the model. Previous related studies tried to find out the effects of FTA and BIT on FDI by simply applying dummy variables of them. In this paper, by applying both dummy variables and cumulative variables of FTA and BIT that capture the duration effect, we can deeply understand the effects of national agreements dealing with investment clauses on FDI more dynamically.

Details

Journal of Korea Trade, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-828X

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5