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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Ahmed al Janahi and David Weir

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These…

Abstract

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These assume that certain fundamental elements of financial rationality guide the intervention of banks and financial institutions in situations of incipient business failure. This study is based on an empirical analysis of companies in the GCC region of companies which are clients of banks which operate within the frameworks of the Islamic Banking System in the Arab Middle East. A “sharp‐bending” orientation rather than a “business failure” model is used and conclusions are reached about the role of the banks and other financial institutions and their methods of managing difficult client situations. Some typical situations relating to problem loans, loan officers’ responses and behaviour and out comes are reviewed. The role of the bank in triggering early problem‐recognition is described and the response of the bank, subsequent actions and the sequence of recovery are described. Procedures and actions which would be regarded as “irrational” in a western cultural context are interpretable as “rational” within different cultural frameworks. We argue that there is no one universally‐accepted frame work of business rationality, and that “financial rationalities” are the product of deeply‐embedded cultural frames of reference.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

David Weir

Abstract

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Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Selim Ahmed, Muhammad Mohiuddin, Mahfuzur Rahman, Kazi Md Tarique and Md. Azim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of Islamic Shariah compliance on customer satisfaction through the mediating effect of service quality in Islamic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of Islamic Shariah compliance on customer satisfaction through the mediating effect of service quality in Islamic banking services.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 334 completed and usable questionnaires were collected from customers of Islamic banks in Bangladesh to test the hypotheses. The data were analyzed using SmartPLS 3.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that Islamic Shariah compliance has a positive and significant influence on service quality and customer satisfaction of Islamic banking services. The research findings also indicate that service quality partially mediate the relationship between Islamic Shariah compliance and customer satisfaction of Islamic banking services.

Research limitations/implications

This study only emphasized on the Islamic banking services of Bangladesh and thus findings of the present study may not be applicable to other service areas.

Practical implications

The implications of the research are twofold. First, a strong standardized effect of Islamic Shariah compliance on service quality implies that customers are very sensitive to Shariah compliance related to Islamic banking services. Next, maintaining service quality is another crucial aspect to satisfy customers of Islamic banks. Quality of services will only be materialized when all the promises made by the bank function accordingly. Therefore, strategy makers of Islamic banks should assess the customer service quality and satisfaction regularly to improve the overall service experience of customers.

Originality/value

Limited studies have been conducted to investigate the mediating effect of service quality on the relationship between Shariah compliance and customer satisfaction in Islamic banking services. This study provides valuable insights to Islamic bank to integrate the service quality along with Shariah compliance to enhance customer satisfaction.

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Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Rafikul Islam, Selim Ahmed, Mahbubar Rahman and Ahmed Al Asheq

The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of various service quality dimensions, namely reliability, responsiveness, visibility, employee commitment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of various service quality dimensions, namely reliability, responsiveness, visibility, employee commitment and access to service on customer satisfaction in the private banking sector of Bangladesh. The research also investigates the relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty and effect of demographic variables on customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers distributed 320 self-administered survey questionnaires among private banks' customers in Bangladesh and obtained 200 useable responses with a 62.5% valid response rate. The research data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling (SEM) approaches. Analysis of variance and logistic regression have also been used to obtain the supplementary findings.

Findings

The research findings indicate that visibility, responsiveness and employee commitment have positive and significant effect on customer satisfaction, whereas reliability and access to service are found to have insignificant influence on customer satisfaction of private banking services. The findings of this study also revealed that customer satisfaction has positive and significant relationship with customer loyalty. But except respondents' occupation type, all other demographic variables have no statistically significant relation with customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused solely on the private banking sector of Bangladesh, and thus the results may not be applicable to other service sectors.

Originality/value

This study conducted on customers' perception of private banking services is based on extended service quality dimensions and its relationship with customer satisfaction towards loyalty. The present research findings are anticipated to offer the guidelines for improving the customer satisfaction and loyalty of private banking services in Bangladesh as well as other countries.

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The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Bassam Mohammad Maali, Usama Adnan Fendi and Muhannad Ahmad Atmeh

This paper aims to investigate the economic substance of Islamic banks’ transaction as perceived by the employees and regulators of banks and the effect of such substance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the economic substance of Islamic banks’ transaction as perceived by the employees and regulators of banks and the effect of such substance on the need for special accounting standards for Islamic banks. If there is a distinctive “Islamic economic substance”, then special accounting practices may be necessary such as the standards of the Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative inquiry on one of the leading Islamic banks in the Middle East was conducted to investigate the economic substance of the bank’s main two transactions; the deposit system and Murabaha financing, as perceived by informants within one of the earliest Islamic banks and its regulators.

Findings

It is found that despite the belief that the transactions under examination were different from equivalents within conventional banking, practice within the bank was not consistent with such a belief. Informants largely perceived the economic reality of the investigated transaction as being not different from conventional banks’ transactions, and this would affect the need for special accounting and regulatory frameworks.

Research limitations/implications

This investigation is confined to informants working within one Islamic bank; their views and perceptions may not coincide with those working in other Islamic banks in the world.

Practical implications

The results of this investigation provide policy implications for Islamic banks, regulators and standards setters in regard to the need for special accounting standards for Islamic banks.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first papers that uses a qualitative inquiry on the main transactions of Islamic banks and the related need for special accounting practices. The paper provides a new perspective on the debate over whether Islamic banking is genuinely innovative or is merely a replicate for conventional banking.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Omar Masood, Ghulam Shabbir Khan Niazi and Noryati Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the factors responsible for the rise and growth of smaller Islamic banks in the last decade.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the factors responsible for the rise and growth of smaller Islamic banks in the last decade.

Design/methodology/approach

Z‐score analysis is used to test the stability of both smaller and larger Islamic banks. The pooled ordinary least square (OLS) regression technique is also employed to examine the factors.

Findings

The results of this paper show higher z‐scores for smaller Islamic banks indicating that the latter have tended to be more stable than larger Islamic banks over the last decade. Z‐scores tend to increase with bank size for large Islamic banks, but decrease with size for the small Islamic banks. The OLS regression results confirm that larger banks have greater income diversity than do the smaller banks.

Originality/value

Islamic banking represents a radical departure from conventional banking, and from the viewpoint of corporate governance; it embodies a number of interesting features since equity participation, risk and profit‐and‐loss sharing arrangements form the basis of Islamic financing. Using econometric techniques, this paper provides valuable insights as to the stability of Islamic banks and the factors responsible for the growth of smaller such institutions that has been witnessed in the last decade.

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Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2019

Iman Adeinat, Naseem Al Rahahleh and M. Ishaq Bhatti

The purpose of this study is to assess customers’ perceptions of Islamic banks (IBs) of customers who have used or intend to use Ijarah service to purchase a car. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess customers’ perceptions of Islamic banks (IBs) of customers who have used or intend to use Ijarah service to purchase a car. The study further examines the mediating role of clarity and accuracy (CAA) of service offered between customer perceptions and customer satisfaction. This paper focuses on connecting in quantitative terms customers’ perceptions of IB services to customer satisfaction by providing the first evidence of this relationship in the context of car Ijarah financing.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a model is proposed to assess customers’ perceptions of the Ijarah service used by IBs to finance car purchases. The model connects customers’ perceptions to customer satisfaction with this Shariah-compliant service. The data are drawn from 300 randomly selected customers living in five major cities in Pakistan, and factor analysis and structural equation modeling are used to understand the patterns of correlation/covariance among a set of variables and to evaluate customers’ perceptions of Ijarah financing for car purchases.

Findings

The results of the study show a significant positive relationship between customers’ perceptions and customer satisfaction. In particular, the CAA of the services provided is a significant predictor of customer satisfaction. This paper finds that CAA is a partial mediator between customers’ perceptions and customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

As this study is based on only one country and one simple car Ijarah financing product, the results cannot be generalized to the entire industry. Therefore, deeper research is needed in which data from other countries are used and a range of models and approaches are applied to secure knowledge about the multinational and multifactor variations of Ijarah financing.

Practical implications

In terms of their implications for IBs, the study results provide a basis for the banks to more effectively cater to their customers by improving the services offered in line with customers’ expectations and thereby increasing profitability. This investigation is much needed in academia and industry because the market share for Ijarah financing is growing and competition between IB products and conventional banking products is increasing.

Originality/value

This study presents the first endeavor to use exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to assess customer satisfaction in Ijarah financing using Pakistani banking clients’ data. This approach is also applicable to various IB financial products and Shariah contracts.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Hung-Che Wu, Ching-Chan Cheng and Ananda Sabil Hussein

The purpose of this paper is to explore the structural relationship between experiential loyalty and its seven drivers – interaction quality, physical environment quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the structural relationship between experiential loyalty and its seven drivers – interaction quality, physical environment quality, outcome quality, affective quality, experiential quality, experiential trust and experiential satisfaction in the context of Islamic banks.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in this study were based on a convenience sample of 474 respondents from Jakarta, Bogor and Depok in Indonesia.

Findings

Interaction quality, physical environment quality and outcome quality positively influence experiential quality, which in turn, leads to experiential trust. Also, experiential trust has a positive influence on experiential satisfaction. Both experiential trust and experiential satisfaction are determinants of experiential loyalty.

Practical implications

The results will assist Islamic bank management in developing and implementing market-orientated service strategies to increase interaction quality, physical environment quality, outcome quality, affective quality experiential quality, experiential trust and experiential satisfaction in order to increase experiential loyalty.

Originality/value

This paper provides data that result in a better understanding of the relationships among interaction quality, physical environment quality, outcome quality, affective quality, experiential quality, experiential trust, experiential satisfaction and experiential loyalty in the context of Islamic banks.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2010

Bassam Maali and Christopher Napier

The paper seeks to examine the cultural factors that shaped the creation of one of the earliest Islamic banks, discussing the tensions that arise between religious and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine the cultural factors that shaped the creation of one of the earliest Islamic banks, discussing the tensions that arise between religious and economic aims.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a case study of a historically significant institution. The information on which the paper is based was obtained through interviews with participants in the process being analysed, review of archived documents, and observation. Edgar Schein's theory of organisational culture and leadership is employed to provide theoretical structure for the analysis.

Findings

The paper shows that creating a new type of organisation – an Islamic bank – in Jordan required special legislation. A study of the development of this legislation reveals that the bank's founder needed to convince both the religious and political authorities and potential investors that the bank would comply with Shari'a principles while at the same time generating profitable business. The outcome was to validate transactions that were Shari'a‐compliant in form but similar in substance to those of conventional banks.

Research limitations/implications

The paper examined one bank, and the findings are not necessarily representative of the experience of other Islamic financial institutions.

Social implications

The research highlights the problems faced in establishing businesses that seek to follow the moral and economic teachings of Islam. The paper contributes to the ongoing debate about whether it is possible to establish genuinely Islamic businesses within a conventional economy.

Originality/value

This is the first detailed academic study of the creation of an Islamic financial institution to make use of a wide range of documentary and oral evidence, including interviews with insiders.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2019

Intekhab Alam

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the process of interaction with the Muslim customers in developing new Islamic financial services in a secular and non-Muslim…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the process of interaction with the Muslim customers in developing new Islamic financial services in a secular and non-Muslim majority emerging country, India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a multiple case study methodology in which the service managers of 23 financial service firms and their customers were interviewed. A total of 46 managers and 31 Muslim customers provided data for this paper.

Findings

A service firm must interact with its Muslim customers to obtain key input and information for developing new Islamic financial services, particularly in a Muslim minority country. The Muslim customers are willing to work with the financial service firms for the purpose of new service development and are a good source of information for new Islamic financial services.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for the financial service firms interested in achieving growth and prosperity by developing and marketing new services to the growing population of Muslim customers in the emerging markets, particularly India.

Originality/value

The issue of customer interaction in new service development is a key concept in the extant literature, yet no study has explored this concept for the Islamic banking and financial products in a non-Muslim majority emerging market. This is the first paper that has applied the customer interaction in new service development theory to the interaction process of Muslim customers in a non-Muslim majority country and, thus, addressed a worthwhile research gap.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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