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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Ahmed Bounfour, Hannu Piekkola and Carter Bloch

Abstract

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Abstract

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Leif Edvinsson and Ahmed Bounfour

In the knowledge economy, the value of corporations, organizations and individuals is directly related to their knowledge and intellectual capital. This does not only…

Abstract

In the knowledge economy, the value of corporations, organizations and individuals is directly related to their knowledge and intellectual capital. This does not only apply to organizations in the private or public sector but also to entire nations. If intangibles and intellectual capital are important to organizations, they are also important to the productivity and competitiveness of nations as a whole. The question we try to answer is how can we better understand the dynamics of intangibles on a national scale?

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Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Wolfgang Baer, Ahmed Bounfour and Thomas J. Housel

Mobile phones are radically transforming micro-finance in Sub-Saharan Africa, and Kenya, in particular. The introduction of the micro-financial transaction mobile phone…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile phones are radically transforming micro-finance in Sub-Saharan Africa, and Kenya, in particular. The introduction of the micro-financial transaction mobile phone application, “MPesa,” created a means to facilitate micro-transactions without the need for an intermediary, such as a banking system. The purpose of this paper is to posit an econophysics model to predict the value of Mpesa for Kenyan and South African consumers. The econophysics framework posits several fitness matrices and a distance measure that can account for the concepts of mass, distance, momentum, velocity, action, and force. The authors begin with a table of the match between the physics concepts and the economic concepts followed by the vector model that utilizes these concepts for the MPesa application case. In this paper, the authors will argue that MPesa succeeded in Sub-Saharan African countries, such as Kenya, because the fit between what this group of customers needed and the solutions Safaricom’s MPesa offered was a better fit with a smaller distance to adoption than in the South African case.

Design/methodology/approach

The research develops an econophysics approach to the assessment of micro-finance development in Sub-Saharan countries.

Findings

The research shows clearly the reasons of the success of MPesa in Kenya in comparison of its relative failure in South Africa: the distance between customers’ expectations and the system supply.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to two case studies and needs to be extended to other contexts, in order to demonstrate its robustness, especially with regard to the intangible dimension, e.g., the distance between a system potential and what it really offers.

Practical implications

The research shows the importance of system’s characteristics in its success.

Social implications

The social implications are very high, especially in this case, where micro-finance is a high stake for developing societies.

Originality/value

This is one of the first works to develop an econophysics approach for the evaluation of the key characteristics of a system.

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Ahmed Bounfour

Abstract

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Pirjo Ståhle and Ahmed Bounfour

The paper aims at creating understanding on the dynamics of intellectual capital (IC), which has emerged recently as one of the major issues on the research agenda. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims at creating understanding on the dynamics of intellectual capital (IC), which has emerged recently as one of the major issues on the research agenda. The theme is studied from a national point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis has been conducted using data from the IMD Competitiveness Report covering the data of 51 countries from the years 2000‐2005. Data analysis is aimed at analysing time dependent relationships between intellectual capital and GNP growth. The research provides parameters of four types of effects for a nation's GNP growth: sustaining effects, boosting effects, linear growth potential and exponential growth potential. Based on the developmental stage of the countries they were grouped to: developing; transitional; and developed countries, and the effects of IC was studied within and between these groups.

Findings

The analysis specifies the types of IC factors that have important effects on economic growth on different level of economics. The analysis also provides an analytical framework for designing the context in which IC of nations can be adequately considered in the mid‐long term perspective.

Research limitations/implications

The research has to be considered as exploratory. It has been conducted using only one database with certain limitations. Further research is needed especially by integrating other components of intellectual capital, e.g. reputation, decision‐making processes, and cultural dimension.

Practical implications

From a practical perspective the findings also provide important guidelines and framework for policy makers.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new view on the dynamics of IC at national level by relating IC ingredients to economic performance and specifying under which circumstances IC has important effects on national GNP growth.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Ahmed Bounfour

Over the last five years several frameworks have been suggested for the development of corporate' competitive advantage, on the basis of their intangible resources. These…

Abstract

Over the last five years several frameworks have been suggested for the development of corporate' competitive advantage, on the basis of their intangible resources. These frameworks are mainly managerially oriented; they require the design of a set of metrics dealing with organisational inputs. Hence the importance of making the link between internal and external perspectives, especially those related to financial performance. Making such a link is the main aim of the intellectual capital dynamic value (IC‐dVAL®) approach, which integrates four dimensions for measurement – inputs, processes, assets, and outputs – and defines ad hoc metrics for measuring intellectual capital in a dynamic way. This approach is now used at the corporate level in several contexts. It is also under consideration for implementation at the mesoeconomic and even the macroeconomic levels. The paper also presents how such an approach can be used at the country level, especially in Europe.

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Giovanni Schiuma, Antonio Lerro and Daniela Carlucci

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relevance of intellectual capital (IC) as a strategic resource and source of regional value creation dynamics. Adopting a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relevance of intellectual capital (IC) as a strategic resource and source of regional value creation dynamics. Adopting a knowledge‐based approach, the authors aim to argue that knowledge assets represent the IC's components, and the Knoware Tree and the Knoware Dashboard are proposed as frameworks to assess the IC within regions. For the global assessment of the IC, the Regional Intellectual Capital Index (RICI) is to be introduced and its application is proposed for the assessment of the IC within Italian regions. Finally, in order to explore the links between the IC ownership of a region and its value creation dynamics, the Value Creation Index (VCI) is adopted and linear correlations of the RICI and VCI are performed, providing first empirical evidences of the positive links between IC and value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper integrates the results of an intensive literature review with a longitudinal empirical research applied to Italian regions.

Findings

The paper provides a knowledge‐based understanding of the IC, highlighting the existence of a positive correlation between IC and value creation of the Italian regions.

Research limitations/implications

The adoption of linear correlation for analysing the empirical data set could be considered as a research limitation, since more rigorous statistical approaches, such as the robust canonical analysis and the structural equation modelling could be adopted.

Practical implications

The paper provides a methodology for assessing IC within regions.

Originality/value

The proposed frameworks for assessing IC within regions are original as well as the empirical results showing a positive links between IC ownership and value creation.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Hans Landström

A great deal of policy thinking in the last ten to 15 years has been driven by the insights gained from the so‐called “new growth theory”. The theory emphasizes that…

Abstract

Purpose

A great deal of policy thinking in the last ten to 15 years has been driven by the insights gained from the so‐called “new growth theory”. The theory emphasizes that investments in knowledge and human capital generate economic growth through spillover of knowledge, and the policy implication is that investments in knowledge and human capital are the best way to stimulate growth. However, there is a couple of missing links in the “spillover argument” in that the theory seems to disregard the role of the entrepreneur. The paper aims to answer the question: Why haven't entrepreneurship researchers become a strong voice regarding the understanding of the development of the knowledge economy?

Design/methodology/approach

The author argues that a dynamic and innovative research field is characterized by a balance between the pursuit of new issues and knowledge in research, for example, by being sensitive for changes in society, and the development of existing knowledge, by integrating and validating the knowledge base already existing within the field.

Findings

The paper shows that one important reason for the lack of visibility of entrepreneurship research can be found in an internal scientific development of the research field – entrepreneurship research has become more and more theory‐driven and shows less sensitivity and openness for changes in society.

Originality/value

The article gives a critical reflection on the development of entrepreneurship as a research field. In this sense the article provides an increased understanding of the knowledge that is within the field, and gives also suggestions for the future development of the research field.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Jean‐Eric Aubert and Derek H.C. Chen

This paper aims to postulate that countries which are either geographical or cultural islands, (defined as countries that are surrounded by neighboring countries that do…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to postulate that countries which are either geographical or cultural islands, (defined as countries that are surrounded by neighboring countries that do not speak the same language), tend to experience higher rates of economic growth, all other things being equal.

Design/methodology/approach

Using historical macroeconomic data for a large number of countries and statistical growth regressions that include island dummy variables as explanatory variables, this paper shows that there is econometric evidence supporting the theory of the island factor.

Findings

The findings highlight the importance of a cohesive society with a strong sense of identity while being economically open to global competitive forces. This island mindset acts as a catalyst for enhanced economic growth.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, the island factor is a new and untested hypothesis. Moreover, the paper contributes to the literature on cultural diversity and growth by showing that cultural diversity among neighboring countries is an important factor for economic development.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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