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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Salakjit Jongsaguan and Ahmad Ghoneim

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the existing theories and knowledge surrounding information systems (IS) evaluation and Green information technology (IT)/IS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the existing theories and knowledge surrounding information systems (IS) evaluation and Green information technology (IT)/IS investments to develop a conceptual model for helping decision makers to overcome and reduce the impacts from Green IT/IS investment related to cost overruns or under-optimized budgets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is discursive, based on the analysis and synthesis of literature pertaining to IS evaluation, Green IT/IS adoption and Sustainable/Green/CSR within an aviation context. Gaps in the preceding research have been identified, and a conceptual model is proposed. Additionally, further research and a methodology are suggested.

Findings

The paper proposes a conceptual model that can identify factors including external factors derived from institutional theory, internal organizational factors, and a list of indirect costs associated with Green IT/IS investments for an aviation organization.

Research limitations/implications

As a conceptual paper, the study is limited to literature, identifying gaps, and proposing a model. The paper recommends further empirical validation of the proposed conceptual model.

Practical implications

The conceptual model is helpful for decision makers within the aviation industry to enhance their understanding of the identification and management of indirect costs within the aviation context, which results in effective management of Green IT/IS indirect costs.

Originality/value

The paper fills gaps in the knowledge of IS evaluation, Green IT/IS adoption/evaluation within aviation context through helping decision makers to understand, identify, and manage the associated indirect costs.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2019

Talah S. Arabiyat, Metri Mdanat, Mohamed Haffar, Ahmad Ghoneim and Omar Arabiyat

The purpose of this paper is to improve understanding of how different aspects of the national institutional environment may influence the extent of innovative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve understanding of how different aspects of the national institutional environment may influence the extent of innovative entrepreneurial activities across countries. Several institutional and conductive factors affecting a country’s capacity to support innovative entrepreneurship are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Institutional theory is used to examine the national regulatory, normative, cognitive and conducive aspects that measure a country’s ability to support innovative entrepreneurship. A cross-national institutional profile is constructed to validate an entrepreneurial innovation model. The impacts of country-level national institutions on innovative entrepreneurial activity as measured by Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data are assessed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Knowledge about the influence of specific institutional aspects on innovative entrepreneurship, and hence of institutional structures within and across countries, is enhanced. For new innovative enterprises, conductive and regulatory aspects seem to matter most. All conductive factors have a significant and positive impact on entrepreneurial activity rates.

Research limitations/implications

Results could support policy makers and practitioners in evaluating government policies’ effects on innovative entrepreneurship. Interventions should target both individual attributes and context. Future research could include longitudinal designs to measure the direction of causality.

Practical implications

Aspects such as regulatory institutions, and conductive factors such as information communication technology use and technology adoption, are important for innovation entrepreneurship development.

Originality/value

The literature on institutional theory and innovative entrepreneurship is highly limited. This study complements growing interest in empirical analysis of the effects of national institutions on innovative entrepreneurial activities and substantiates previous empirical work.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Zahir Irani and Ahmad Ghoneim

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159

Abstract

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Zahir Irani and Ahmad Ghoneim

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48

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Maged Al, Ahmad Ghoneim and Zahir Irani

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554

Abstract

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Zahir Irani and Ahmad Ghoneim

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444

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Zahir Irani and Ahmad Ghoneim

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319

Abstract

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Peter E.D. Love, Ahmad Ghoneim and Zahir Irani

Many companies are increasing their expenditure on information technology and information systems (IT/IS) to obtain or even sustain a competitive advantage in their…

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2344

Abstract

Many companies are increasing their expenditure on information technology and information systems (IT/IS) to obtain or even sustain a competitive advantage in their respective marketplaces. Many managers, however, are often left with the quandary of how to evaluate their investments in technologies. Reasons of this difficulty have been suggested in the normative literature as centring on the socio‐technical (human, organisational and technical) dimensions associated with the adoption of IT/IS. The inability of managers to determine the true costs of deploying IT/IS is considered attributable to a lack of knowledge and understanding of IT/IS related costs. In developing a broader picture of such cost dimensions and their respective taxonomies, the research presented in this paper uses a structured case method to gain an understanding of how a construction firm embraced the IT evaluation process. A review of the IT cost literature is presented and a conceptual IT evaluation framework that focuses on indirect costs is proposed.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Ray Hackney, Andrea Loesch, Zahir Irani, Ahmad Ghoneim and Sevgi Ozkan

To evaluate issues relating to the implementation of electronic reverse auctions (eRA) within local government procurement processes.

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625

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate issues relating to the implementation of electronic reverse auctions (eRA) within local government procurement processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a structured case analysis approach to enable qualitative data to be modelled through a visual toolset simulation.

Findings

The paper identifies a set of business scenarios to demonstrate the impact of different eRA strategies in this respect.

Practical implications

The case research described in this paper proposes a detailed, achievable and valid approach to evaluating the complex issues associated with eRAs.

Originality/value

The outcome of the investigation will provide valuable insights into the complexities associated with the eProcurement process.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Nandish V. Patel and Ahmad Ghoneim

The aim of this paper is to examine empirically the relevance of the theory of deferred action for knowledge management systems (KMS) design in practice.

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1509

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine empirically the relevance of the theory of deferred action for knowledge management systems (KMS) design in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a case study approach to examine knowledge work and knowledge management in virtual teamwork in a large UK telecommunications company to understand the occurrence of emergent knowledge and how it is managed by virtual team leaders. The section in the company studied is described as a “knowledge intensive organization” dealing with the company's e‐commerce activities.

Findings

The analysis confirms the complex adaptive system hypothesis – a complex system adapts to its environment through self‐organization. The data reveal the behaviour of the virtual team to be self‐organizing and adaptive to its environment. It confirms the knowledge tacitness hypothesis and social embeddedness of knowledge hypothesis as important determinants of knowledge sharing. Specifically, the data reveal the main issues concerning knowledge sharing practices of virtual team workers and the crucial team leader's role in the effectiveness of the teams' capability to develop social links to externalise and share tacit knowledge to accomplish tasks.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper, the authors contribute “emergent knowledge” as a third category of organizational knowledge in addition to the existing tacit and explicit knowledge that needs to be considered when designing KMS. It also derives socio‐technical systems design principles based on the theory of deferred action, and a tentative development process with metrics is then proposed for KMS design that caters for emergent, tacit, and explicit knowledge.

Practical implications

Existing models such as the SECI model do not acknowledge emergent knowledge or its conversion into explicit knowledge. The theory of deferred action is invoked to derive design principles, termed deferred systems design principles, to depict how explicit knowledge, tacit knowledge, and emergent knowledge can be represented to design knowledge management systems for “emergent organizations”.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the limited research and lack of consideration of emergent knowledge as an integral part of organizational knowledge, especially in an era of emergent organizations.

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