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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Nor Hawani Wan Abd Rahman, Mustaffa Mohamed Zain and Norashfah Hanim Yaakop Yahaya Al‐Haj

The main aim of this study is to assess the level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure of 44 government‐linked companies (GLCs) listed on Bursa Malaysia and…

5349

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to assess the level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure of 44 government‐linked companies (GLCs) listed on Bursa Malaysia and to ascertain the relationship of certain company characteristics; namely size, age, profitability and leverage on the total CSR disclosure from the year 2005 to 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis is deployed to determine CSR disclosure. A disclosure index consisting of 16 items was developed based on four general themes: human resource, marketplace, community and environment to assess the disclosure level. The relationship between company characteristics and total disclosure was examined using multiple linear regression analysis.

Findings

The major finding of this study is that the theme of disclosure has shifted from human resource to marketplace. This is followed by human resource, community and, finally, environment. Ironically, companies are not only disclosing good news, but also bad/negative news. This study provides further evidence that is, to a certain extent, some GLCs have influenced other companies' practices to disclose CSR information. Company size was found to be positively significant associated with the total disclosure. The remaining variables were found to be insignificant in explaining the total disclosure.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that looks into CSR activities, extent, themes and the determinants of CSR disclosure in the annual reports of Malaysian GLCs. The Malaysian Government, Bursa Saham, Security Commission and other relevant parties could take heed of the findings to further improve CSR awareness, practices and disclosures and quality in GLC.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2013

Jamilah Ahmad and Suriati Saad

The goal of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is to ensure that organisations embrace social responsibility and cultivate activities that provide positive impact on…

Abstract

The goal of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is to ensure that organisations embrace social responsibility and cultivate activities that provide positive impact on the environment, society, consumers, employees, communities and all other members of the public sphere. Therefore, it is highly important to enhance and augment the teaching of CSR across various disciplines in higher learning institutions. Since 2006, most organisations in Malaysia have been highly encouraged to carry out their Social Responsibility activities, with the government providing support for CSR policies through its tax reduction incentives. Various CSR awards and acknowledgement of the awards provide high value and positive reputation to the organisations that implement CSR-related activities. As a result there is an increasing awareness among businesses to focus beyond compliance with laws in order to respond to the dynamic economic, societal and environmental changes.

Details

Education and Corporate Social Responsibility International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-590-6

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Suresh Kumar Krishnan

281

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Naresh Kumar and Raduan Che Rose

The purpose of this paper is to present an in‐depth analysis of the knowledge sharing enablers and the moderating role of Islamic work ethic (IWE) on the relationship…

4353

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an in‐depth analysis of the knowledge sharing enablers and the moderating role of Islamic work ethic (IWE) on the relationship between knowledge sharing and innovation capability in the public sector organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The foundations of knowledge sharing capability, IWE and innovation capability were assessed using a validated survey instrument. A total of 472 Administrative and Diplomatic Service Officers from the Malaysian public sector organizations participated in the survey.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that the intrinsic motivation to share knowledge is significant in the public sector organizations. The relationship between knowledge sharing capability and innovation capability of employees in the public sector organizations was found to be contingent on IWE.

Research limitations/implications

While the study was salient and confined to the Malaysian public sector organizations, it has considerable implications for the development of an optimistic workforce in other regions and across sectors. Cross‐sectional studies are encouraged to further confirm the results.

Practical implications

An understanding of the pledge of the workforce to knowledge sharing, IWE and its consequences for innovativeness facilitates public sector organizations in designing and implementing modernization initiatives.

Originality/value

In response to the substantial need to examine IWE and workplace outcomes in a non‐Western environment, the paper embraces the extent to which IWE sways the link between knowledge sharing and innovation capability in the public sector organizations. Both scholars and practitioners will find the study valuable.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2019

Nur Shafiqa Kapeli and Nafsiah Mohamed

Corruption is a serious problem in Southeast Asian countries. Based on the average ranking of Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index, Malaysia is ranked…

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Abstract

Purpose

Corruption is a serious problem in Southeast Asian countries. Based on the average ranking of Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index, Malaysia is ranked as the second least corrupt country among Southeast Asian countries. However, this country is still facing problems in its fight against corruption, in which efforts undertaken to prevent corruption have been said to be “unsatisfactory.” The purpose of this paper is hence to examine previous literature for the possible factors affecting the success of anti-corruption efforts in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes previous studies conducted on Malaysia’s experiences in its fight against corruption.

Findings

The findings of this paper indicate four attributes that lead to the failure of anti-corruption efforts in Malaysia.

Originality/value

This paper will be useful for scholars, policymakers and anti-corruption practitioners who are interested in Malaysia’s experiences in fighting corruption.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Tarek Ibrahim Eldomiaty, Ola Atia, Ahmad Badawy and Hassan Hafez

The literature on the relation between dividends and stock risks include mixed results. The related studies have reached either insignificant, or positive, or negative…

1411

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on the relation between dividends and stock risks include mixed results. The related studies have reached either insignificant, or positive, or negative results. The authors offer a mathematical structure that addresses potential mutual benefits of dividends signaling under conditions of stock risks (systematic and unsystematic). The mathematical structure demonstrates explicitly a case of risk transfer. The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential benefits to firms and stockholders when financial managers adjust dividends per share (DPS) using percentage change in the explanatory power of systematic and unsystematic risks. This perspective is derived from a practical consideration that dividends are part of stock returns that can be adjusted to take stock risks into account.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes the specifications of the two-stage (simultaneous) regression and partial adjustment model. The sample includes quarterly data for firms listed in the Dow Jones Industrial Average and NASDAQ for the period December 31, 1989-March 31, 2011.

Findings

The authors have reached general results based on hypotheses developed from related literature. The results show that: first, benefits of risk transfer can be realized. That is, firms as well as stockholders achieve benefits when the DPS are adjusted using percentage change in the explanatory power of systematic risk only; second, dividend growth rates are affected positively by changes in systematic risks; third, the highest stock returns in the market are reached with sharp decreases in dividend growth rates; fourth, in the highest returns quartile, firm size and time do not matter but the industry type does; and fifth, the associations between dividend growth rates, systematic, unsystematic risks, and stock returns are intrinsically nonlinear.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature in terms of first, providing practical insights on the financial strategies that help in the use of dividends to convey the right signals to stockholders, and second, empirically show the potential benefits of adjusting dividends growth rates according to systematic and unsystematic stock risks in a unified mathematical structure that adds to the current literature.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 July 2022

David Seth Jones

The aim of the paper is to analyse the prevalence of corruption in Malaysia since 2004 in relation to political leadership, implementation of anti-corruption measures and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to analyse the prevalence of corruption in Malaysia since 2004 in relation to political leadership, implementation of anti-corruption measures and the political and business culture based on money politics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from the information and data provided by the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission, the Malaysian government, international organisations, media reports, and academic papers.

Findings

The paper analyses the perceived extent of corruption in Malaysia by examining how successive governments have dealt with the problem through a wide range of measures. Corruption remains widespread because of ineffective implementation, a culture of money politics based on mutually beneficial crony associations between political actors and business leaders, political interference to frustrate enforcement against corruption offenders, especially prominent personalities, and the mixed impact of corruption prevention measures. The paper concludes that the political and business culture and the nature of political leadership have eroded the political will to combat grand corruption in Malaysia.

Originality/value

This paper builds on previous research on corruption in Malaysia and highlights the combined negative impact of political leadership and a business and political culture that tolerates and espouses corruption, especially through money politics, and the consequent weak political will for tackling grand corruption.

Details

Public Administration and Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1727-2645

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Effiezal Aswadi Abdul Wahab, Mazlina Mat Zain, Kieran James and Hasnah Haron

The purpose of this paper is to extend the audit pricing literature by examining whether institutional investors and political connection are associated with higher audit fees.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the audit pricing literature by examining whether institutional investors and political connection are associated with higher audit fees.

Design/methodology/approach

Both descriptive and multivariate analyses are employed to address the research objectives. In addition, the authors use panel data to control for both heterocedasticity and contemporaneous correlations in each cross‐section.

Findings

Based on a panel analysis of 390 Malaysian firms from 1999 to 2003, a positive relationship between institutional ownership and audit fees is found, although the economic impact is minimal. Further, the authors find that audit fees are higher for politically connected firms.

Research limitations/implications

A thorough examination on the role of political connection is much warranted to provide a better understanding on such connection influences the audit market.

Originality/value

This paper provides an alternative view on the role of political connection, and on how they influence the audit market.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2015

Effiezal Aswadi Abdul Wahab, Mazlina Mat Zain and Rashidah Abdul Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether political connections further impair auditor independence by investigating the relationship between non-audit fees and…

1569

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether political connections further impair auditor independence by investigating the relationship between non-audit fees and audit fees and as to whether political connections moderate such relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs panel regression analysis. The panel data set consists of 379 firm-year observations for three years from year 2001 to 2003.

Findings

Based on 379 firm-year observations for the period of 2001-2003, grounded on two proxies of political connections namely politically connected firms and the proportion of Bumiputras directors, the authors find a positive and significant relationship between non-audit fees and audit fees, and the relationship becomes weaker, only for Bumiputra-dominated firms connected firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the extant literature by examining the role of political connections in the context of auditor independence. In addition, this study is conducted in Malaysia, which provides a unique institutional environment with the existence of political connections that is built on ethnic grounds.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 14 June 2016

Rozhan Abu Dardak and Farzana Quoquab

Entrepreneurship, Strategic Marketing, Innovation, New product development (NPD).

Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship, Strategic Marketing, Innovation, New product development (NPD).

Study level/applicability

This case is suitable to be used in advanced undergraduate, and MBA/MSc.

Case overview

This case illustrates the challenges related to commercializing an innovative product, the coconut dehusking machine in the Malaysian market. It revolves around the issues pertaining to the pre and post-lunch activities and bottleneck of the coconut dehusking and defibering (CDD) machine which was developed by Md Akhir in July 2003. Md Akhir, the senior research officer at Mechanization and Automation Research Centre, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), believed that it was the first coconut dehusker in Malaysia. During 2000, farmers used to dehusk coconut manually, as there was no readily available machine to help them. Thus, Md Akhir felt the necessity to innovate such a machine that could help the farmers to dehusk efficiently in comparatively less effort and time. From 2003 to 2005, he presented his innovation in several national and international exhibitions and received accolades for such innovative product. In 2005, MARDI signed the memorandum of agreement of five years to license the CDD with Phytofolia Sendirian Berhad without having Md Akhir’s consent. Phytofolia was a comparatively new company owned by two entrepreneurs – Azmin Samin and Abd Hamid. During 2007, Phytofolia changed the specification of the CDD without informing to Md Akhir. Furthermore, two machines were sold to a company in Papua New Guinea, but no feedback was sought about the performance of the modified CDD. The price of CDD was set very high and thus the local farmers refused to buy it. In 2009, Hamid left Phytofolia due to disagreement with his business partner. He collaborated with Mr Sigiarno a venture capitalist from Indonesia and offer MARDI RM200,000 up-front to buy the IP of the CDD. At the end of the contract, Phytofolia failed to pay the royalty to MARDI and the contract ended in 2010. By seeing the fall of memorandum of agreement, MARDI asked Md Akhir to decide the next step whether to sign new agreement with Phytofolia, to sign agreement with Hamid’s newly formed company Kelapa Gading, to giving up commercialization and provide this machine to the farmers free of cost or to create a start-up company, fabricate and market the CDD. Md Akhir was really confused about which way to go!

Expected learning outcomes

Using this case, students can learn how a small and/or medium scale company can strategize its new product launch. Based on the given industry scenario, students can realize the potential challenges that are related to launching a new product. Furthermore, this case demonstrates that producing a high-quality product is not enough to succeed in the market; right strategy also plays an important role in making it successful. Finally, it can be also learned that proper marketing strategy, good coordination and communication with support companies as well as internal harmony are three important factors that contributes in any business success. Overall, entrepreneurship students will learn how to use the opportunity and manage the innovation. On the other hand, strategic marketing students will learn the importance of adopting proper strategy, while the students who are undertaking the new product development course will be benefited by seeing the practical situation of a new product launch, its rise and its fall.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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