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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Fred Reneau and Richard Patterson

Online agricultural information services offer agriculturalists the opportunity to access information related to the planning, management, and operation of agricultural

Abstract

Online agricultural information services offer agriculturalists the opportunity to access information related to the planning, management, and operation of agricultural enterprises. Online agricultural information services are outlined, agricultural related services rendered by online networks are discussed, service comparisons are presented, and benefits of agricultural online services are also discussed.

Details

Online Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Liqun Tang, Qiang Liu, Wanjiang Yang and Jianying Wang

The purpose of this paper is to clarify agricultural services into five categories, including agricultural materials supply service, financial service, technical service

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify agricultural services into five categories, including agricultural materials supply service, financial service, technical service, machinery service and processing and sales service, and to examine the effect of agricultural services on cost saving of rice production in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a three-year panel data set covering 3,421 rice farmers in 12 Chinese provinces collected from the state rice industry experiment stations’ fixed watch points of China Agriculture Research System, a stochastic frontier model which takes the price vectors of input variables into cost function is developed by stochastic frontier analysis method in the study.

Findings

There is a deviation between the actual cost and the minimum cost on rice production in China due to the loss of cost efficiency, whose score is 0.7983 at the mean. Agricultural services can help improve cost efficiency, thus contributing to cost saving. Specifically, the effect of technical service on cost saving is the highest, followed by processing and sales service, machinery service, financial service and agricultural materials supply service.

Originality/value

The results of this paper are of great significance to the effectiveness and efficiency of the targeted agricultural services and indicate implications for policy improvement under the context of clear upward trend of agricultural production costs.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2017

Qiongwei Ye and Baojun Ma

Internet + and Electronic Business in China is a comprehensive resource that provides insight and analysis into E-commerce in China and how it has revolutionized and…

Abstract

Internet + and Electronic Business in China is a comprehensive resource that provides insight and analysis into E-commerce in China and how it has revolutionized and continues to revolutionize business and society. Split into four distinct sections, the book first lays out the theoretical foundations and fundamental concepts of E-Business before moving on to look at internet+ innovation models and their applications in different industries such as agriculture, finance and commerce. The book then provides a comprehensive analysis of E-business platforms and their applications in China before finishing with four comprehensive case studies of major E-business projects, providing readers with successful examples of implementing E-Business entrepreneurship projects.

Internet + and Electronic Business in China is a comprehensive resource that provides insights and analysis into how E-commerce has revolutionized and continues to revolutionize business and society in China.

Details

Internet+ and Electronic Business in China: Innovation and Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-115-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Muluken Gezahegn Wordofa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceptions of smallholder farmers toward the cost-sharing agricultural extension service provision.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceptions of smallholder farmers toward the cost-sharing agricultural extension service provision.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used data from a cross-sectional survey, key informants interviews and focused group discussions conducted on 384 farm households from six Kebeles of Eastern Ethiopia.

Findings

The authors find that flexibility and credibility, ability of development agents to address neglected aspects in agricultural production, and reaching diversified groups of farmers as the perceived advantages of the cost-sharing approach. Furthermore, improved knowledge and attitude, enhanced research–extension–farmer linkages, and improved food security and poverty reduction are found to be the three most important impact areas associated with the approach. On the contrary, poor economic status of farmers, high cost of administration and absence of a clear guideline/legislation are found to be the most important constraints. The authors find that increasing farmers’ awareness about the cost-sharing approach and preparing a clear definition of the form, modalities and principles of the cost-sharing extension approach can be a part of the practical solutions to overcome the challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The current research is limited to the investigation of farmers’ perceptions toward paid extension services. The willingness to pay for extension services – using discrete choice experiments – is dealt with in another paper.

Originality/value

The first of its kind in the country, the paper tried to assess farmers’ readiness to try a new extension service delivery. The findings have important implications for policy makers and local level implementers of extension programs.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Ahmed Abdel-Maksoud and Bahgat Abdel-Maksoud

The purpose of this study is to propose a performance measurement (PM) model for agricultural extension agents. Based on an interdisciplinary approach, management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a performance measurement (PM) model for agricultural extension agents. Based on an interdisciplinary approach, management accounting-agricultural extension, the study has three main research objectives: highlight the main concepts to be embedded in a PM model for agricultural extension agents in an agricultural extension organization (RO1); identify main PM components of the proposed PM model for agricultural extension agents (RO2); and investigate empirically the causal relationships in the proposed PM model (RO3).

Design/methodology/approach

An interdisciplinary literature review and a proposed PM model for agricultural extension agents are presented (RO1 and RO2). An empirical survey is incorporated, carried out in early 2011 (RO3), to examine three groups, totaling around 274 respondents. Data were collected through personal interviews using structured questionnaire forms. Path analysis technique was applied.

Findings

The authors propose a PM model consisting of five components. The five components are: agricultural extension agents’ characteristics, agents’ work attitudes, services provided, use of agricultural extension services and farmers’ satisfaction with agricultural extension services. The overall findings of the empirical surveys were found to validate the suggested causal relations among the components of the model. Findings indicate that 85 per cent of changes in farmers’ satisfaction with services are explained by changes in the preceding variables in the model.

Research limitations/implications

It is, however, important to view this study with a few limitations in mind; for instance, using a survey method (e.g. sampling and the use of questionnaires in data collection); and the constraints associated with the model. That is to say that the components of the model could be further increased to incorporate other aspects of stakeholders, e.g. the economic impact of governmental financial policies on tax and the customs duties on agricultural products.

Practical implications

A Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations agricultural extension reference manual recommends certain purposes for a PM in agricultural extension organizations; interestingly, all these are already embedded in the proposed PM model, which makes it unequivocally a useful PM model for agriculture extension agents in agricultural extension organizations worldwide. Furthermore, the proposed model contributes significantly to agricultural extension practitioners and academics alike. It focuses the attention of agricultural extension organizations on the causal relationships among the model’s components. These components are linked to the agricultural extension organization strategies.

Social implications

In addition to the practical implications above, the proposed PM model demonstrates the need for placing equal importance on all five components included and setting performance indicator (PI) targets.

Originality/value

The importance of this study emerges from the fact that it is helpful to examine the development and implementation of PM models across various disciplines to enhance understanding. The PM model overcomes the shortcomings in previous PM models of agricultural extension agents’ criteria/models in the agricultural extension literature. It is not merely a theoretically proposed model because the proposed causal relations amongst its variables are empirically investigated. Following management accounting and strategy theories, the authors propose that the relative importance of the attributes of PI in the proposed model differs according to each agricultural extension organization’s strategy, size and organizational structure.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Alim Belek and Abega Ngono Jean-Marie

This study aims to assess the effects of microfinance institution (MFI) services on the productivity of family farms in Cameroon, in the region of Mbam and Kim. It will be…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the effects of microfinance institution (MFI) services on the productivity of family farms in Cameroon, in the region of Mbam and Kim. It will be a question, therefore, of determining the level and determiners of the outputs of family farms, in particular those concerned by the cultures of cocoa, beneficiaries of the agricultural services of MFIs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the Blinder (1973) and Oaxaca (1973) model of decomposition of the productivity differential between beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of agricultural credits on a sample of 130 cocoa farming households and four MFIs of the same area between 2008 and 2011.

Findings

The yield gap between beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of agricultural credits is estimated at 0.19 tons per hectare. This gap is explained positively by the financial aid variable, the farm size variable, which is significant in the explanation of the beneficiaries' level of returns and the constant term. On the other hand, all the socio-economic variables of the farmers contribute to reduce this gap of productivity.

Research limitations/implications

This financial assistance from CVECA is essential to increase agricultural yields because it helps to cancel out some structural barriers. However, as this improvement in yields is only possible for large farms, the services of the MFIs would rather favor extensification policies. Nevertheless, the study results are limited by the negative effects of the socio-economic characteristics of the farmers on these yields, the study having been revealed without any selectivity bias.

Originality/value

This study seeks to reverse the trend that in rural areas, MFIs are financing agriculture to increase extensification rather than enhancing intensification in sub-Saharan Africa by challenging the role of MFI services in intensification.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2011

Gershon Feder, Regina Birner and Jock R. Anderson

The poor performance of public agricultural extension systems in developing countries engendered interest in pluralistic concepts of extension involving a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

The poor performance of public agricultural extension systems in developing countries engendered interest in pluralistic concepts of extension involving a variety of service providers. Within the reform agenda, modalities relying on private‐sector providers were perceived as a path to improvement. This paper aims to assess the potential and limitations of such modalities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the conceptual underpinnings of these extension approaches, highlights theoretical and practical challenges inherent in their design, and provides an assessment of several performance‐based case studies described in the formal and informal literature.

Findings

Many of the modalities reviewed entail partnerships between the public sector, farmers' organizations or communities, and private‐sector providers. The paper concludes that while private‐sector participation can overcome some of the deficiencies of public extension systems, there are also challenges that have been faced, including misuse of public funds, insufficient accountability to farmers, inequitable provision of service, inadequate quality, and limited coverage of the wide range of farmers' needs.

Practical implications

The review suggests that private‐sector involvement in extension is no panacea. Extension systems need not be uniform, and will require different providers for different clienteles, with public providers and funding focusing more on smaller‐scale and less commercial farmers. The public sector may need to provide some regulatory oversight of private‐sector extension activities, particularly when public funding is involved.

Originality/value

The paper draws conclusions from a diverse range of experiences, some of which are recent, and provides comparative insights. It may be of interest to development scholars and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

A.P.N. Thapisa

Begins by tracing the efforts that have been undertaken to establish an agricultural information programme in Southern Africa. Argues that in order to develop an…

Abstract

Begins by tracing the efforts that have been undertaken to establish an agricultural information programme in Southern Africa. Argues that in order to develop an appropriate agricultural information programme in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) there is need to establish in each SADC country an agricultural information policy which supports both the generation of agricultural information and the development and training of agricultural information specialists. Gives an illustration of a programme which will provide the necessary professional training. Stresses that existing agricultural libraries need to be empowered in such a way that they are able to carry out their function effectively. A regional network should also be established to provide for the speedy delivery of information to end‐users. Concludes by calling for stability in the region to enable the agricultural information programme to succeed.

Details

Library Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Chandan Kumar Jha and Vijaya Gupta

The farmers used several information sources to gather information about the climatic variability and modern agricultural practices to cope with climate change. The choice…

Abstract

Purpose

The farmers used several information sources to gather information about the climatic variability and modern agricultural practices to cope with climate change. The choice of adaptation strategies and the successful implication of adaptation strategies depend on accurate, timely information on the climate variability and precise technical details of adaptation strategies. By keeping the importance of climate information and agricultural extension information in the center, this study aims to conduct a micro-level evaluation of farmers’ choice of climate information, agriculture extension services and agricultural credit sources. This study’s primary objective is to understand how the different sources of climate information and agricultural extension influence farm household adaptation decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has been conducted in three subs agro-climatic zone of the Middle Gangetic Plain region, which falls in India’s Bihar state. This paper has randomly selected seven districts from these three subs agro-climatic zone to collect the data. The analysis of this study is based on survey data collected from 700 farm households. This study has used descriptive statistics and a logistic regression model to assess the sources of climate information, agricultural extension and credit sources and how these sources influence farm households’ adaptation decisions.

Findings

The result of this study shows farmers are using different traditional (sharing experience, newspaper and radio), information and communication technology (mobile and TV) and institutional arrangements (agricultural officer and meteorological department) in the study area. The study’s finding identifies different farm households’ different sources and how these options farming farmers’ adaptation decisions. The study further revealed that institutional factors such as extension services and access to information on climate change increase the probability of adopting knowledge-intensive adaptation strategies such as soil conservation, water conservation, crop insurance and planting horticulture and vegetables.

Research limitations/implications

The study has conducted a micro-level assessment of adaptation behavior at the local level to understand the factor influencing the adaptation decision. This study’s finding is useful in designing the appropriate policy framework for the farm household’s capacity building to enhance their technical skills and awareness toward the institutional arrangements.

Originality/value

This paper’s finding pointed out institutional arrangements’ requirement to improve adaptive capacity to make long-term strategic decisions to cope with climate change.

Details

Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Sailas Nyareza and Archie L. Dick

This paper aims to report an investigation into the benefits and limitations of radio to communicate agricultural information to peasant farmers, and how it can be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report an investigation into the benefits and limitations of radio to communicate agricultural information to peasant farmers, and how it can be successfully incorporated into agricultural extension service programs in Zimbabwe.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative research techniques were applied to gather, analyze and interpret data. A total of 25 semi‐structured interviews were conducted with peasant farmers in Ward 16 of the Buhera South Constituency, and four in‐depth interviews were conducted with key informants in agricultural extension and radio services.

Findings

Extension service programs do not satisfy the agricultural information needs of peasant farmers because: there are not enough extension workers; they do not have the means of transport to reach all households; they lack the communication skills to interact effectively with the peasant farmers; and they lack the motivation to carry out their work. A community radio service was the most preferred medium of communication for rural peasant farmers. The farming radio programs are relevant to their agricultural activities, their language and accents are used, and they can contribute to the program content.

Originality/value

The study proposes a suitable model for communicating agricultural information effectively to the peasant farmers. The model elaborates how the community radio service should be set up, what the important components are, and how the community radio service can be incorporated into extension service programs.

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