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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Mohamad Sadegh Sangari and Jafar Razmi

The purpose of this paper is to study the role of business intelligence (BI) in achieving agility in supply chain context by examining the relationship between BI…

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3758

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the role of business intelligence (BI) in achieving agility in supply chain context by examining the relationship between BI competence, agile capabilities, and agile performance of the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework is developed drawing on the resource-based view, the dynamic capabilities perspective, and the competence-capability relationship paradigm, as well as an extensive review of the literature. Structural equation modeling is employed to analyze the data collected from Iranian manufacturers in the automotive industry.

Findings

The empirical results support the conceptualization of supply chain BI competence as a multi-dimensional construct comprising managerial, technical, and cultural competence, and confirm that it is a key enabler of supply chain agility in terms of both agile capabilities and agile performance. The results also provide support for partial mediation of agile capabilities on the relationship between BI competence and agile performance of the supply chain.

Originality/value

This paper provides a response to the identified need for empirical evidence on the benefits derived from BI, especially in the supply chain context. It also contributes to the existing supply chain agility literature by providing insight into the value and role of BI in enhancing agile capabilities and performance in the inter-organizational supply chain.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Adler Haymans Manurung and Randy Kurniawan

This study aims to examine the joint impact of networking capability and agile project management on organizational agility of telecommunication technology providers' in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the joint impact of networking capability and agile project management on organizational agility of telecommunication technology providers' in Indonesia. The study also examines the moderating role of market orientation as a predominant strategic orientation on the relationship between agile project management and organizational agility.

Design/methodology/approach

Research data were collected via a questionnaire survey from the executive management of telecommunication technology providers in Indonesia to obtain 150 valid questionnaires for analysis. This study analyzed the overall model fit and causal relationship using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that networking capability positively affects organizational agility. However, agile project management's significant effect on organizational agility occurs only when the relationship is moderated by market orientation. The results of the study also demonstrate that organizational agility positively affects organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on a cross-sectional nature and might fail to capture the studied variables' dynamic over an extended period.

Originality/value

The study enriches the previous literature in organizational agility by presenting the collective impact of networking capability and agile project management and the moderating role of market orientation. However, dissimilar with major prior studies, the results indicate that agile project management's direct effect on organizational agility is not significant. Agile project management needs to be moderated by market orientation to create exceptional customer values and overcome the competition for the organization to achieve organizational agility, responsiveness and adaptability to address customers' needs and requirements. Furthermore, the study's result corroborates the importance of organizational agility to achieve organizational performance in the highly dynamic telecommunication industry.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Aparna Raman and Sangeeta Shah Bharadwaj

The purpose of t1his paper is to develop an instrument to measure agile services based on dynamic capabilities theory. The paper investigates the service agility through…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of t1his paper is to develop an instrument to measure agile services based on dynamic capabilities theory. The paper investigates the service agility through two building blocks service sensing and seizing agility and service responding agility.

Design/methodology/approach

The items were generated using existing scales, content analysis and using in-depth interview. The scale was validated using data from Indian services industry.

Findings

A pool of 32 items for dynamic service capabilities enabling agile services and 12 items for agile services were proposed. Empirical validation shows that the scale exhibits high levels of reliability.

Research limitations/implications

The new concept of agile services has been introduced, which is of recent interest to both practitioners and academicians alike. The limitations of the study include a low respondent rate.

Practical implications

Organizations need measure the degree of agile services and different capabilities this can facilitate agile services. This scale can act as a foundation for organizations to evaluate their capabilities. This scale will act as a tool for top managers to assess their capabilities and suitably improve the capabilities of their services.

Originality/value

The capabilities enabling agile services are based on the dynamic capabilities framework and a new construct (agile services) is being proposed. This scale will be a theoretical contribution to this literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Mohamed El Mokadem

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how manufacturing strategies could affect the supplier selection criteria used by business firms.

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1806

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how manufacturing strategies could affect the supplier selection criteria used by business firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey strategy was used to empirically understand the research argument. First, principal component factor analysis was employed to validate the underlying structure of the supplier selection criteria. Then, simple regression analysis was employed to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Organizations pursuing lean strategies will emphasize factors that improve their efficiency when selecting their suppliers, while organizations pursuing agile strategies will assert factors that improve their ability to respond to customer unique requirements when selecting their suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides new insight for researchers to understand the effect of manufacturing strategies on the classification of supplier selection criteria. However, the small sample size might limit the ability to generalize research findings. Further research is required to confirm the findings using a wider sample.

Practical implications

This research provides practitioners with useful insights into how to select their suppliers based on their manufacturing strategies.

Originality/value

This paper classifies supplier selection criteria into three distinct groups: lean, agile, and common capabilities. Lean capability refers to the list of criteria that are highly relevant in selecting suppliers for lean implementers. Agile capability refers to the list of criteria that are highly relevant in selecting suppliers for agile implementers. Finally, common capability refers to the list of criteria that have comparable relevance in selecting suppliers for both lean and agile implementers.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

One-Ki Daniel Lee, Peng Xu, Jean-Pierre Kuilboer and Noushin Ashrafi

The purpose of this study is to understand how IT capabilities for knowledge management and process integration can build a firm's agile process capabilities for sensing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand how IT capabilities for knowledge management and process integration can build a firm's agile process capabilities for sensing, strategic decision and responding. The study also investigates how the three agile capabilities affect firm performance in different competitive environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a large-scale field survey with firms in the United States. Survey invitations were sent to business executives of the target firms. A total of 254 complete samples were collected for our hypotheses test.

Findings

The results confirm the overall significant roles of IT capabilities in the three agile capabilities. The results further reveal that the IT capability for knowledge management has a higher influence on sensing capability, while the IT capability for process integration has a higher influence on responding capability. Moreover, strategic decision and responding capabilities are more important in the high market competition. However, in the low market competition, sensing capability becomes more important while responding capability demonstrates a negative impact on firm performance.

Originality/value

This study helps both academics and practitioners better understand a firm's IT-agility-performance mechanism. Particularly, our findings guide how to achieve agile capabilities and what to focus on under the different levels of market competition.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Melis Attar and Aleem Abdul-Kareem

The present business environment of accelerated complexity, ambiguity, uncertainty and volatility seems not to be settling down soon. Today’s business world is…

Abstract

The present business environment of accelerated complexity, ambiguity, uncertainty and volatility seems not to be settling down soon. Today’s business world is consistently bombarded with turmoil and unprecedented change. This makes it very difficult for organisations to accurately predict possible future opportunities and threats. To overcome this scenario, organisations need to fully embrace and implement agility in their operations. However, for organisations to develop a considerable level of agility that corresponds to the current hypercompetitive and volatile environment, premium needs to be placed on agile leadership. Agile leaders are capable of setting the guiding principles, develop strategies and build mechanisms that will lead to smooth transition to organisational agility (OA). These leaders give directions on how to make organisations agile and ensure that there is a leadership culture that models and promotes a holistic agility in the organisation. The primary purpose of this chapter is to establish the position of agile leadership in determining OA. The study departs from previous studies by using empirical reviews to depict the significance of agile leadership and its key roles on OA. Specifically, the concept, evolution and characteristics of OA are explored, as well as its benefits and multidimensional nature are discussed. Furthermore, the chapter sheds light on agile leadership, levels of leadership agility and competencies of successful agile leaders. The chapter concludes that the leadership style suitable for OA is agile leadership. This calls for business investments in agile capacity building and development of frameworks suitable for agile leadership.

Details

Agile Business Leadership Methods for Industry 4.0
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-381-6

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2017

Mandeep Saini, Mohammed Arif and Dennis J. Kulonda

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the critical success factors (CSFs) associated with the effectiveness of transfer and sharing of tacit knowledge in lean and…

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3162

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the critical success factors (CSFs) associated with the effectiveness of transfer and sharing of tacit knowledge in lean and agile construction processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study identifies ten CSFs that initiate the transferring and sharing of tacit knowledge. The CSFs are validated through quantitative study. This study recruited project managers, executives, consultants and other managers that are directly involved in the management of a construction project. It recruits the respondents those have background and experience from disciplines such as lean construction, agile construction, construction supply chain (CSC) and knowledge management in lean, agile and CSC. The data collected through self-administrative questionnaire are categorised as ordinal data to analyse in SPSS with frequency and Kruskal–Wallis H test, Spearman’s correlation analysis and a rank-order analysis is done to establish the level of importance of those factors.

Findings

Initially, “Trust between construction organisations” is identified as the foremost CSF. Moreover, other CSFs such as motivation, leadership capabilities, business strategies and organisational capabilities follow trust.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates and establishes the CSFs that are essential to initiate transferring and sharing tacit knowledge in a lean and in an agile construction processes.

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Joachim Kahl, Saskia de Klerk and Robert Ogulin

This paper takes a holistic and process-based view on agility from a Middle Management (MM) perspective. Its purpose is to identify subjective factors of agility emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper takes a holistic and process-based view on agility from a Middle Management (MM) perspective. Its purpose is to identify subjective factors of agility emerging from people's interpretations and perceptions and to integrate them into the process of agile strategy-making.

Design/methodology/approach

To provide a theoretical foundation, literature was reviewed in the area of agile diversity and strategy-making. A qualitative study based on interviews was conducted to uncover the hidden subjective factors from the personal experiences and perceptions of the participants.

Findings

The study has revealed that individual opinions in terms of agility can originate from three sources: individual understandings, contextual drivers and personal beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

The research contributes to dynamic capability theory by providing a better understanding of agile diversity at the MM level. The findings can help mid-level executives to cope with the complexities and ambiguities in managing agility by aligning the different understandings and people's perceptions. This is crucial, as missing alignment of team members can lead to poor dynamic capabilities of business entities and thus threatens overall organisational agility.

Originality/value

A model was developed to align the subjective factors of agility during the process of agile strategy-making at the MM level. The framework allows a flexible adaptation to the individual demands of organisational units, as well as concentrated measures for effective agile management. It contributes to organisational agility and business success by scaling the dynamic capabilities of MM.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Mattias Hallgren and Jan Olhager

Lean and agile manufacturing are two initiatives that are used by manufacturing plant managers to improve operations capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to…

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17853

Abstract

Purpose

Lean and agile manufacturing are two initiatives that are used by manufacturing plant managers to improve operations capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to investigate internal and external factors that drive the choice of lean and agile operations capabilities and their respective impact on operational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Lean and agile manufacturing are each conceptualized as a second‐order factor and measured through a bundle of distinct practices. The competitive intensity of industry and the competitive strategy are modeled as potential external and internal drivers, respectively, and the impact on quality, delivery, cost, and flexibility performance is analyzed using structural equations modeling. The model is tested with data from the high performance manufacturing project comprising a total of 211 plants from three industries and seven countries.

Findings

The results indicate that lean and agile manufacturing differ in terms of drivers and outcomes. The choice of a cost‐leadership strategy fully mediates the impact of the competitive intensity of industry as a driver of lean manufacturing, while agile manufacturing is directly affected by both internal and external drivers, i.e. a differentiation strategy as well as the competitive intensity of industry. Agile manufacturing is found to be negatively associated with a cost‐leadership strategy, emphasizing the difference between lean and agile manufacturing. The major differences in performance outcomes are related to cost and flexibility, such that lean manufacturing has a significant impact on cost performance (whereas agile manufacturing has not), and that agile manufacturing has a stronger relationship with volume as well as product mix flexibility than does lean manufacturing.

Research limitations/implications

Cross‐sectional data from three industries and seven countries are used, and it would be interesting to test this model for more industries and countries.

Practical implications

The results provide insights into the factors that influence the choice of lean or agile manufacturing for improving operations, and the results that can be obtained.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, this is the first large‐scale empirical survey of leanness and agility simultaneously, using data from manufacturing firms in Europe, Asia, and North America. The model incorporates a wide perspective on factors related to lean and agile manufacturing, to be able to identify similarities and differences.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Remko I. van Hoek, Alan Harrison and Martin Christopher

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16700

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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