Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Erin Pleggenkuhle-Miles, Theodore A. Khoury, David L. Deeds and Livia Markoczy

This study aims to explore the objectivity in third-party ratings. Third-party ratings are often based on some form of aggregation of various experts' opinions with the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the objectivity in third-party ratings. Third-party ratings are often based on some form of aggregation of various experts' opinions with the assumption that the potential judgment biases of the experts cancel each other out. While psychology research has suggested that experts can be unintentionally biased, management literature has not considered the effect of expert bias on the objectivity of third-party ratings. Thus, this study seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Ranking data from the US News and World Report between 1993 and 2008, institution-related variables and, to represent sports prominence, NCAA football and basketball performance variables are leveraged in testing our hypotheses. A mediating-model is tested using regression with panel-corrected standard errors.

Findings

This study finds that the judgments of academicians and recruiters, concerning the quality of universities, have been biased by the prominence of a university's sports teams and that the bias introduced to these experts mediates the aggregated bias in the resultant rankings of MBA programs. Moreover, it finds that experts may inflate rankings by up to two positions.

Practical implications

This study is particularly relevant for university officials as it uncovers how universities can tangibly manipulate the relative perception of quality through sports team prominence. For third-party rating systems, the reliability of ratings based on aggregated expert judgments is called into question.

Originality/value

This study addresses a significant gap in the literature by examining how a rating system may be unintentionally biased through the aggregation of experts' judgments. Given the heavy reliance on third-party rating systems by both academics and the general population, addressing the objectivity of such ratings is crucial.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Hugh M. Arce and Kenneth A. Reinert

A recurrent concern of researchers who measure the cost of protection isthat welfare estimates based on models with highly aggregated sectors ofthe economy in question…

Abstract

A recurrent concern of researchers who measure the cost of protection is that welfare estimates based on models with highly aggregated sectors of the economy in question will understate the true cost of protection if the tariff system is not uniform. Uses the 1988 tariff schedule of the US and a detailed 1988 social accounting matrix of the US to construct a number of aggregation schemes to calculate the extent to which tariff means and variances change under different aggregations. Then uses a computable general equilibrium model to compare the cost of tariff protection between two of the aggregation schemes.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Muhammad Aftab, Karim Bux Shah Syed and Naveed Akhter Katper

After the fall of fix exchange rate regime in early 1970s, the nexus between the exchange rate volatility and trade flows has been of a great interest to the policy makers…

Abstract

Purpose

After the fall of fix exchange rate regime in early 1970s, the nexus between the exchange rate volatility and trade flows has been of a great interest to the policy makers and researchers. Resultantly an extensive literature is available on the topic. However, the research findings are inconclusiveness so far. The purpose of this paper is to examine the exchange-rate volatility and bilateral industry trade link between the two important countries of Southeast Asia, i.e. Malaysia and Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) (1, 1) to measure exchange rate volatility and autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model to study the relationship between exchange rate volatility and trade flows. ARDL approach is suitable to accommodate the mix cases (i.e. stationary and first difference stationary). The paper considers 62 Malaysian exporting and 60 Malaysian importing industries with Thailand over the monthly period 2000-2013.

Findings

Findings suggest the influence of exchange-rate volatility on the trade flows in a limited number of industries. Large industries like instruments and apparatus experience negative influence from exchange-rate volatility.

Originality/value

Past literature continued to be inconclusiveness on the nexus between exchange-rate volatility and trade flows due to its over-reliance on the aggregated data. Besides, the past studies are more based on quarterly or yearly frequency data. These issues contribute to the aggregation bias. This research focusses on a country bilateral trade pair, using industry level disaggregated monthly data. Such research is rare in Malaysian-Thai bilateral trade context. This study uses a suitable estimation approach and also draws valuable implications.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2004

W.A. Barnett and J.M. Binner

Abstract

Details

Functional Structure and Approximation in Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-861-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Scott Nicholson

The purpose of this work is to present an alternative way of considering evidence‐based librarianship (EBL) through an examination of the data that makes up studies used for EBL.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this work is to present an alternative way of considering evidence‐based librarianship (EBL) through an examination of the data that makes up studies used for EBL.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece starts with the standard evidence‐based librarianship definition and deconstructs it down to the level of the individual user, and that data is considered in a different context.

Findings

The bibliomining process, or the combination of data warehousing, data mining, and bibliometrics, is used as a framework to build a different path to EBL. Bibliomining‐based evidence‐based librarianship is not appropriate for all topics; however, when the artifacts of library use can be gathered and explored, this method can provide a different path to reach the goals of EBL.

Originality/value

As the quantity of studies needed for traditional EBL are not currently available, this alternate method provides a way to achieve the goals of EBL through data already in the library systems.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Atif Açikgöz, Gary P. Latham and Fulya Acikgoz

The purpose of this study is to reveal the mediating role of scenario planning between reflection and task performance in new product development (NPD) teams.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to reveal the mediating role of scenario planning between reflection and task performance in new product development (NPD) teams.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional research design was used to collect data from 78 NPD teams and 194 employees. The mediation analyses were conducted through the bootstrap PROCESS macro method.

Findings

The results of this study yielded support for two of three hypotheses. The authors found that the relationship of reflection with product development speed and new product success is mediated by scenario planning. There was no mediation of scenario planning between reflection and product development cost.

Research limitations/implications

These findings show how teams can capitalize on reflective thinking practices to increase NPD task performance through scenario planning.

Practical implications

This study provides useful guidelines for team leaders on how to accelerate product development processes and to increase the market success of a new product. Leaders should encourage their teams to review their previous performance metrics with ongoing changes in the business environments.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine the mediating role of scenario planning on the reflection–task performance relationship in NPD teams.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Panel Data Econometrics Theoretical Contributions and Empirical Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-836-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Anthony Owusu‐Ansah

The purpose of this paper is to examine if temporal aggregation matters in the construction of house price indices and to test the accuracy of alternative index…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if temporal aggregation matters in the construction of house price indices and to test the accuracy of alternative index construction methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Five index construction models based on the hedonic, repeat‐sales and hybrid methods are examined. The accuracy of the alternative index construction methods are examined using the mean squared error and out‐of‐sample technique. Monthly, quarterly, semi‐yearly and yearly indices are constructed for each of the methods and six null hypotheses are tested to examine the temporal aggregation effect.

Findings

Overall, the hedonic is the best method to use. While running separate regressions to estimate the index is best at the broader level of time aggregation like the annual, pooling data together and including time dummies to estimate the index is the best at the lower level of time aggregation. The repeat‐sales method is the least preferred method. The results also show that it is important to limit time to the lowest level of temporal aggregation when construction property price indices.

Practical implications

This paper provides alternative method, the mean squared error method based on an out‐of‐sample technique to evaluate the accuracy of alternative index construction methods.

Originality/value

The introduction of financial products like the property derivatives and home equity insurances to the financial market calls for accurate and robust property price indices. However, the index method and level of temporal aggregation to use still remain unresolved in the index construction literature. This paper contributes to fill these gaps.

Details

Property Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Brittany Harker Martin

Managerial mindset and cognitive bias can be barriers to any transformation strategy. In the case of telework, most employees express willingness to telework, yet, few…

Abstract

Purpose

Managerial mindset and cognitive bias can be barriers to any transformation strategy. In the case of telework, most employees express willingness to telework, yet, few firms formally enable it during regular business hours. The status quo is a daily commute to the traditional workplace. The purpose of this paper is to test framing interventions designed to harness cognitive biases through choice architecture.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon behavioral strategy and prospect theory, this paper presents two studies: quasi-experiments with 146 senior business students and experiments in the field (replication using random assignment and extension) with 84 senior decision makers. Both studies use a one-way between-subjects design and chi-square analysis.

Findings

Findings support the proposition that, although cognitive biases can act as barriers to transformation, they can be re-framed through strategic interventions. Specifically, in both studies, there was a drastic increase in adoption simply by changing the way the choice was presented. Findings in the lab were cross-validated in the field. Observed shifts in preferences provide evidence that embedding the right reference point within communications can frame a decision choice more favorably. Findings also support that a bias for an implicitly perceived status quo can be overruled through an explicitly stated reference point.

Research limitations/implications

It is an assumption of behavioral strategy that most individuals simply respond to the gains/loss framing without being influenced by other psychological or contextual factors, and though these effects dissipate through aggregation, it is a limitation nonetheless. Indeed, using an individual construct to explain an organizational phenomenon is a well-debated topic in the field of strategy, with proponents on both sides. The distinguishing factor, here, is that behavioral strategists are only interested in results at the aggregated level.

Practical implications

Practitioners attempting to roll out telework adoption, or any transformation, now have proven strategies for designing frames of reference that intervene against and harness the power of loss aversion and the status quo.

Social implications

This paper measures micro processes that have an effect at the macro level. It explains systematic aversion to adoption as an aggregation of decision-making behavior that is seemingly subconscious. In doing so, it highlights the impact of bounded rationality perpetuated through social systems, while measuring effective interventions designed to make systematic behavior more predictable.

Originality/value

A novel contribution is made in designing/testing a new frame for systematic resistance to change that frames the status quo as the losing prospect. In this frame, the perceived loss is in the choice not to change, and loss aversion proves to be an effective tool for facilitating systematic change.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Robert Finger

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of data aggregation and farm‐level crop acreage on the level of natural hedge, i.e. the level of price‐yield…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of data aggregation and farm‐level crop acreage on the level of natural hedge, i.e. the level of price‐yield correlations, which is an important issue in risk modeling and management.

Design/methodology/approach

Swiss FADN data for five crops covering the period 2002‐2009 are used to estimate price‐yield correlations at the farm‐ as well as on an aggregated level. Tobit regressions are used to estimate empirical relationships between the level of natural hedge and the underlying crop acreage.

Findings

Price‐yield correlations differ significantly between farm‐ and aggregated‐level. More specifically, the natural hedge observed at the farm‐level is much smaller, i.e. correlations are closer to zero. Taking correlations from aggregated levels thus leads to an underestimation of farm‐level revenue variability. Furthermore, it is found that larger farms have a stronger natural hedge. For instance, a 1 percent increase in area under maize and intensive barley leads to a change in the correlation by −0.02 and −0.08, respectively.

Practical implications

The natural hedge is often approximated with correlations observed at more aggregated levels, e.g. the county level. The results show that this implies errors in risk assessment and modeling as well as insurance applications. Thus, farm‐level estimates should be used. The here presented relationship between price‐yield correlations and farm‐level crop acreage can be used to derive better information on levels of the natural hedge.

Originality/value

Even though the effects of data aggregation on price‐yield correlations have been discussed in earlier research, this paper is the first to also account for on‐farm effects of underlying crop acreage on levels of natural hedge. It is found that this simple relationship can be useful in risk management and modeling applications.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 72 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000