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Article

MA. Xinxin

Social participation (SP) has been shown to have a favorable impact on health status, particularly among elders in developed countries. However, empirical study is scarce…

Abstract

Purpose

Social participation (SP) has been shown to have a favorable impact on health status, particularly among elders in developed countries. However, empirical study is scarce for China. This study explores the relation between social participation (SP) and health status among middle-aged adults and elders in China when controlled socioeconomic characteristics of individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs an empirical study based on the data from a three-wave national longitudinal survey: the Chinese Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) from 2011, 2013 to 2015. It collects data from 28,895 individuals aged 45–84. It uses lagged variable method (LV) to address the reverse causality problem, and the random-effects model or fixed-effect model to address the heterogeneity problem.

Findings

The paper finds the social participation positively affect self-reported health statistically. The influence of social participation on self-reported health flows through two channels: the improved mental health effect (SP-MH-SRH channel) and the increased income effect (SP-income-SRH channel). In comparison with the SAP-income-SRH channel, the influence of the SP-MH-SRH channel l is greater.

Research limitations/implications

First, the absence of other measures of volunteering, such as hours of social participation that are not available in the employed dataset. Second, even though the LV model and FE model are used in the paper, there may remain the endogeneity problem in the results. Third, the influences of formal and informal social participation should be distinguished in the future research.

Social implications

Social participation may improve the self-reported health status. The influence of SP on health may be due to the improved mental health effect (SP-MH-SRH channel). In order to improve the mental and physical health status of middle-aged adults and elders the government should consider even more promotion of social participation.

Originality/value

First, this paper focuses on the correlation between social participation and well-being (self-reported health) of middle-aged adults and elderly in China, the previous studies on the issue for China are scarce. Second, this paper uses the lagged variable method (LV) to address the reverse causal relation problem, and the fixed-effects model or the random-effects model to address the heterogeneity problem. Third, the two channels (the improved mental health effect and the increased income effect) are firstly investigated in this study.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article

Jing Jian Xiao and Rui Yao

The purpose of this paper is to document debt delinquency patterns by family lifecycle categories using multiple data sets that are nationally representative of American…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document debt delinquency patterns by family lifecycle categories using multiple data sets that are nationally representative of American families.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous research, 15 lifecycle categories appropriate for American families are defined by household head's age, marital status, presence of children, and age of children. Data used are from Surveys of Consumer Finances (SCF) in the USA in 1992-2010. Multiple logistic regressions are conducted to identify probabilities of debt delinquencies of families in various lifecycle categories by controlling for income, financial assets, holdings of several types of debt, and several other demographic and socioeconomic variables.

Findings

The results show that among the 15 household lifecycle categories, the top three most likely to be delinquent are young couples with children aged seven or older, middle-aged singles with children aged 15 or older, and middle-aged singles with children under 15. Younger households are more financially distressed than their older counterparts. Presence of children increases the probability of debt delinquency.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, multiple national data sets representing American families are used to document debt delinquency patterns by family lifecycle categories. Results shed light on this important topic and offer helpful information for both banking industry practitioners and consumer financial educators.

Practical implications

The information produced by this study can help bank managers better identify their potential clients and understand their current customers. Different marketing strategies based on the research findings can be developed to attract and retain customers with different delinquency risks.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine debt delinquencies by family lifecycle categories with multiple SCF data sets in the USA. The 15 family lifecycle categories used are based on recent research that is specially designed for American families. The research findings provide straightforward implications for both bank managers and consumer educators.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Article

Natsuho Yoshida

The purpose of this paper is to explore individual enrolment trajectories to fully understand the actual disparity in secondary education enrolment statuses among the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore individual enrolment trajectories to fully understand the actual disparity in secondary education enrolment statuses among the different socio-economic status (SES) groups in a newly emerged nation, Myanmar.

Design/methodology/approach

The differences in enrolment statuses among various SES groups (high, middle and low) were examined based on enrolment trajectory diagrams and individual enrolment patterns using longitudinal data. The analyses utilised a sample of 932 students from government schools in the urban Yangon Region.

Findings

The results revealed that the ideal enrolment trajectory cases (i.e. entering secondary education at Myanmar’s official age and completing all grades without repetition) increased for the highest-SES level, whilst the cases with diverse and complex enrolment trajectories increased for the lower-SES levels. Additionally, over-aged students in the lowest-SES level (boys in particular) were more likely to demonstrate worse enrolment patterns.

Originality/value

By analysing disparities with enrolment trajectories rather than with the cross-sectional parity index, the findings offer clearer and more detailed evidence for the current enrolment status inequalities by SES level in Myanmar. This more complete evidence could allow for an effective accomplishment of worldwide equitable and universal secondary education.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

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Article

Kimberley Peters and Richard G. Rogers

Using data from the linked National Health Interview Survey National Death Index (NHIS‐NDI), a new and unique data set, we examine the interaction of age and self‐rated…

Abstract

Using data from the linked National Health Interview Survey National Death Index (NHIS‐NDI), a new and unique data set, we examine the interaction of age and self‐rated health as a predictor of overall and cause‐specific mortality. Proponents of wear and tear theories argue that as the body ages, it begins to degenerate, leaving the aged in poor health and vulnerable to their ultimate mortality. We find that although the majority of the elderly rate their health as good or better, low levels of education and income contribute to poor perceived health, and the effect of age on mortality varies by level of perceived health. While the oldest old who report the poorest health experience greater risks of mortality, elders who report good health experience much lower risks. As a larger share of our population survives into old age, it is important to emphasize preventive health care policy, as well as strong economic and health care safety nets, not only to promote health but also to lengthen life.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Kate Ann Levin, David Anderson and Emilia Crighton

The purpose of this study is to calculate gender and socioeconomic status (SES) inequalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Greater Glasgow and Clyde…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to calculate gender and socioeconomic status (SES) inequalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Greater Glasgow and Clyde and measure the proportion of inequalities explained by smoking.

Design/methodology/approach

Medical records until May 2016 were linked to mortality data to measure COPD prevalence. Population estimates for smoking status were calculated by merging three (2013–2015) Scottish Household Survey rounds. Poisson regression was carried out to analyse the relationship between SES and gender inequalities in COPD, and smoking.

Findings

Crude COPD prevalence for ages 16+ years was 3.29% and for ages 45 years+ was 6.26%, and higher in females than males. Adjusting for age and sex, prevalence of COPD in the most deprived quintile was 4.5 times of that in the least deprived. Adjustment for smoking explains almost half of the relative difference between Scottish Indicator for Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 1 (least affluent quintile of deprivation) and SIMD 5 (most affluent quintile) and a fifth of the absolute difference. There is a higher risk of COPD among male non-smokers than female, but among smokers the risk is greater for females than males.

Research limitations/implications

Risk factors specific to respiratory health beyond smoking and common risk factors of morbidity more generally should be considered in understanding inequalities in COPD.

Originality/value

Prevalence of COPD is higher than previously thought. Smoking explains less than half of inequalities in COPD. Gender inequalities in COPD are dependent on smoking status and the smoking indicator used.

Details

Health Education, vol. 120 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article

Naiwei Chen, Ho-Chyuan Chen and Shih-Yu Lin

Prior research mostly focuses on the effect of over-education on happiness, whereas the effect of under-education on happiness has received minimal attention. In addition…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research mostly focuses on the effect of over-education on happiness, whereas the effect of under-education on happiness has received minimal attention. In addition, no research to date has examined the effect of both over- and under-education on happiness by using a full spectrum of workers. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to fill this research gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The ordered probit model is estimated to examine the effect of the education–occupation mismatch on happiness based on 2012 survey data from Taiwan.

Findings

The results generally indicate that over-education positively affects happiness, whereas under-education has a minimal effect. The effect of the education–occupation mismatch on happiness also varies with different age groups. Specifically, over-education positively affects happiness except for workers aged 42 and above, whereas negative effects of under-education are found only among workers aged between 32 and 42 when their social network is insufficiently extensive. Moreover, a worker’s social network as a non-pecuniary factor, rather than income as a pecuniary factor, is a major channel through which education enhances happiness.

Originality/value

Given the limited and mixed evidence on the relationship between over-education and happiness, this study contributes to the existing literature by examining whether and how the education–occupation mismatch (over- and under-education) affects the happiness of workers both directly and indirectly via pecuniary and non-pecuniary factors. The research issue remains unexplored to date. Addressing such a question should help explain the persistent trend in pursuing higher education in Taiwan, although highly educated people may suffer from unemployment and an education–occupation mismatch.

Peer review

The peer review history for this paper is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-04-2019-0283

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Helen R. Wheeler

At least three demographic trends in the twentieth century are having a tremendous impact on the patterns of women's lives. With increased life expectancy, reduced…

Abstract

At least three demographic trends in the twentieth century are having a tremendous impact on the patterns of women's lives. With increased life expectancy, reduced birth‐rate, and expanded occupational mobility, the life cycle of the American female has undergone great change. At midlife, many women today begin roles new to them—widow/divorcee, student, salaried employee, head‐of‐household are usually discussed. They may be confronted with new challenges—entering or reentering the labor force, returning to school, renewing old skills and roles—or may merely be struggling to survive. Rarely mentioned are the never‐married women and the fact that most people work because they must acquire the basics for themselves and/or for others.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Abstract

Details

Understanding the Investor: A Maltese Study of Risk and Behavior in Financial Investment Decisions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-705-9

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Book part

Michael J. Lovaglia, Shane D. Soboroff, Christopher P. Kelley, Christabel L. Rogalin and Jeffrey W. Lucas

To determine the age at which influence peaks for men and women at work, then use empirical data to develop procedures predicting complex combining effects of diffuse…

Abstract

Purpose

To determine the age at which influence peaks for men and women at work, then use empirical data to develop procedures predicting complex combining effects of diffuse status characteristics.

Methodology/approach

A survey experiment with a nationally representative sample is used to measure the age at which the status value of men and women at work reaches a maximum. Research results are then incorporated into equations adapted from current status characteristics theory (SCT) procedures to model the combined effects of age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, income, occupation, and beauty.

Findings

Analyses reveal that the status value of men and women reaches a maximum in middle age, and that women reach a maximum status value at work at an earlier age than men.

Research limitations/implications

This approach maintains core assumptions of SCT and uses ongoing research results to calibrate a model predicting complex combining effects of diffuse status characteristics. Limitations include the need to develop additional empirical constants to make predictions in new research settings.

Practical implications

Predictions from the model can be used in hiring situations to adjust for interviewers’ nonconscious expectations related to status characteristics of job applicants.

Social implications

The disadvantage for women at work that increases through mid-career helps to explain the continuing underrepresentation of women in senior leadership positions. Awareness of the impact of socially valued characteristics like age and gender can help individuals respond more effectively to challenging social situations.

Originality/value

Extend the current SCT model to make predictions in contexts where people are being evaluated such as elections, hiring, and promotions.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-192-8

Keywords

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