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Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

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Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Seyed Mohammad Sadegh Khaksar, Fatemeh S. Shahmehr, Rajiv Khosla and Mei Tai Chu

By developing a conceptual model, the purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the role of social assistive technologies in facilitating the process of…

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Abstract

Purpose

By developing a conceptual model, the purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the role of social assistive technologies in facilitating the process of service innovation in care providing organisations to adopt the principles of the consumer-directed care strategy and reduce perceived consumer vulnerability.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross-sectional survey method, the authors collected data through a survey questionnaire distributed among 335 aged caregivers and specialists. The conceptual model and its 11 research hypotheses were examined using confirmatory factor analysis in structural equation modelling. The rival and mediation models were also estimated.

Findings

The conceptual model was validated and eight of eleven hypotheses were supported. It was found that dynamic capabilities are crucial to developing service innovation concept in care providing organisations. In this way, social assistive technologies play a facilitating role to promote the consumer-directed care strategy throughout care providing organisations and allow care providers to enhance wellbeing of vulnerable older people based on their socio-economic status. From the lens of aged care providers, it was also found that the consumer-directed care strategy implemented in aged care facilities may help reduce consumer vulnerability among older people especially when they use social assistive technologies in their service settings.

Practical implications

This study suggests aged care service providers should boost dynamic service innovation capabilities to improve the need for social assistive technologies in aged care facilities with respect to the importance of the consumer-directed care strategy.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the development and validation of a conceptual model for the use of social assistive technologies to sustain service innovation in aged care business models and enhance the consumer-directed care strategy’s performance to better understand consumer vulnerability among older people.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Jane Zhang

This paper analyses the risks of the elderly and needs for aged care in China as a major social problem faced by the Chinese government in the 21st century, suggests the…

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1137

Abstract

This paper analyses the risks of the elderly and needs for aged care in China as a major social problem faced by the Chinese government in the 21st century, suggests the development of aged care accounting as a tool of providing information for policy‐makers, and outlines a general framework for such a development. The role of accounting in addressing aged care issues is recognised with a view to expanding social and demographic dimensions of accounting. Social and economic developments in China have increased people’s life expectancy which is leading to rapid population ageing. Meanwhile, the economic reform has largely dismantled the infrastructure of the traditional socialist care system. Consequently, there is growing concern about the risk and financing of aged care. The “one couple with one child” policy in China has also brought up the issue whether China will be able to afford the enormous amount of cost that aged care needs in the 21st century. The emergence of accounting for aged care is likely to provide information which can be used to address these demographic issues.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 29 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Monika Csesko and Richard Reed

This paper aims to provide an invaluable insight into long‐term forecasting of demand for aged care facilities. This will ensure the provision of adequate supply by…

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1770

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an invaluable insight into long‐term forecasting of demand for aged care facilities. This will ensure the provision of adequate supply by government bodies, stakeholders and developers in order to meet the anticipated level of demand, without creating an over‐supply or an under‐supply scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an innovative approach, different data sources were collectively used to forecast separate individual supply and demand levels, which were then examined together in order to measure the difference between the two variables between 2009‐2020. A case study approach was used for Victoria, Australia.

Findings

The paper finds that, although there is excess supply between 2009‐2010 and 2019‐2020, the period between 2010 and 2019 will experience an under‐supply period which cannot be easily rectified over the short term.

Research limitations/implications

The case study was limited to residential care facilities in Victoria, Australia, although some countries have substantially different age profiles and accommodation supply for older residents. Forecasts are based on information sources from various data suppliers and collectively analysed.

Practical implications

The results are also of direct interest to place managers and planning authorities who are charged with providing medium‐ and long‐term visions and plans for specific locations. This type of research is essential when planning for the eventual aging of the population, where the methodology can be replicated in different areas. Most importantly, this research approach provides a solid basis for decisions regarding the supply of residential aged care facilities as opposed to a simple estimate.

Originality/value

The study adopted a unique approach to analysing the individual supply and demand components for aged care facilities over the long term. This approach is able to accurately determine when there will be an under‐supply or over‐supply situation and thus provide the opportunity to address the difference before it occurs. This will allow informed decisions about planning aged care facilities in the future to be made as required.

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Property Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Madalyn Anne Scerri and Rajka Presbury

This paper offers an exploration of contextual factors that influence carer-to-resident talk in Australian residential aged care.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers an exploration of contextual factors that influence carer-to-resident talk in Australian residential aged care.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory multiple case study methodology and a theoretical framework of service language were applied to explore the perspectives of 21 registered nurses, assistants in nursing, leisure and lifestyle officers, general managers and care managers at three residential aged care homes in Australia.

Findings

The findings demonstrate contextual factors related to the care home environment, the carer and the relationship between carers and residents that impede or enable carer-to-resident talk in residential aged care. Multiple factors related to the care home environment were found to impede carer-to-resident talk, including time pressures, staffing levels, team culture and the prioritisation of tasks. Factors related to carers had potential to either impede or enable talk, including carers' awareness of the importance of communication, level of experience and individual characteristics, values and attitudes. A strong relationship between a carer and resident built on knowledge of individuals was a key enabling factor.

Originality/value

The paper advances an understanding of factors that influence talk and interaction in residential aged care in Australia from carers' and care home leaders' perspectives. The findings can be used to support verbal communication management strategies aligned with a person-centred care approach, including training and development of staff, cultural change interventions and a review of care delivery procedures.

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Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2020

Seyed Mohammad Sadegh Khaksar, Asghar Afshar Jahanshahi, Bret Slade and Sobhan Asian

This study focuses on the adoption of wearable technologies in a context where care-providing organizations can offer, in collaboration with caregivers, better care

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on the adoption of wearable technologies in a context where care-providing organizations can offer, in collaboration with caregivers, better care. Drawing on dual-factor theory and from the caregiver perspective, this study identifies and examines factors of technology adoption in four developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was undertaken using a quantitative approach. A survey was distributed among 1,013 caregivers in four developing countries in Asia including Iran, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Iraq and collected quantitative data for model validation and hypotheses analysis. Building on the technology adoption literature, we identified six constructs that impact the behavioral intention of caregivers to use wearable technologies in aged care-providing organizations.

Findings

Our dual-factor model was successfully validated, and all hypotheses were supported. However, different results were found in the selected countries within the cross-country analysis.

Originality/value

This study has significant implications for the study of emerging technologies in aged care service operations. It provides a theoretical framework that may be adapted for future research, enabling practitioners in aged care to better understand the crucial role of technology adoption in service operations. Less attention was paid to the adoption of wearable technologies in aged care, particularly in developing countries, where healthcare services in aged care impose heavy costs on care providers.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Marilyn Clarke and Katherine Ravenswood

The purpose of this paper is to explore career identity within the aged care sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore career identity within the aged care sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a descriptive interpretive methodology using 32 in-depth, semi-structured interviews.

Findings

This paper shows that social processes and occupational and professional status issues shape career identity in an aged care context. Individuals seek positive career identities through emphasising job fit in relation to their personal experience and values in order to counteract the impact of “taint”.

Research limitations/implications

This study was based in one organisation. Future research could explore its findings in the context of multiple organisations, and include the concept of career identity in other low status, “tainted” occupations, such as childcare, in order to develop a more complete understanding of identity construction processes.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that aged care providers could employ a values-driven approach to recruitment, complementary to pay and career development, to enhance recruitment and retention of aged care employees. Universities and professional bodies could consider more active use of aged care student placements to highlight the opportunities that aged care offer to new graduates in allied health professions.

Originality/value

This paper extends our understanding of career identity in relation to “taint” and “dirty work” in the context of two occupational groups in the understudied sector of aged care.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2018

Jacinta Ellen Sutcliffe and Subas P. Dhakal

The broader challenges of youth employment and ageing population have collectively received global attention in the Sustainable Development Goals. Under the assumption…

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1516

Abstract

Purpose

The broader challenges of youth employment and ageing population have collectively received global attention in the Sustainable Development Goals. Under the assumption that there are fertile opportunities to judiciously address the youth unemployment and labour shortages within the aged care sector, the purpose of this paper is to draw on the experiences of millennial aged care workers (MACWs) in Western Australia (WA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper makes use of an exploratory research approach which involved three aged care facilities in WA. A total of 19 semi-structured interviews with MACWs (n=14), human resources managers of aged care facilities (n=3), government official (n=1), and a union representative (n=1) were carried out.

Findings

The results revealed that millennials prefer positive working relationships with managers, co-workers and residents, flexible work schedules and value the altruistic nature of the profession. In addition, unsupportive work environment and workplace pressure to satisfy the needs of elderly residents reduced millennials’ desire to remain in the industry.

Originality/value

These findings have the potential to inform human resources managers, aged care service providers and policy makers to formulate strategies to retain the millennials, especially the unemployed, considered vital to the vitality of the Australian aged care industry.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Anne Hogden, David Greenfield, Mark Brandon, Deborah Debono, Virginia Mumford, Johanna Westbrook and Jeffrey Braithwaite

Quality of care in the residential aged sector has changed over the past decade. The purpose of this paper is to examine these changes from the perspectives of staff to…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality of care in the residential aged sector has changed over the past decade. The purpose of this paper is to examine these changes from the perspectives of staff to identify factors influencing quality of residential aged care, and the role and influence of an aged care accreditation programme.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were held with 66 aged care staff from 11 Australian aged care facilities. Data from semi-structured interviews were analysed to capture categories representing participant views.

Findings

Participants reported two factors stimulating change: developments in the aged care regulatory and policy framework, and rising consumer expectations. Four corresponding effects on service quality were identified: increasing complexity of resident care, renewed built environments of aged care facilities, growing focus on resident-centred care and the influence of accreditation on resident quality of life. The accreditation programme was viewed as maintaining minimum standards of quality throughout regulatory and social change, yet was considered to lack capacity of itself to explicitly promote or improve resident quality of life.

Research limitations/implications

For an increasingly complex aged care population, regulatory and societal change has led to a shift in service provision from institutional care models to one that is becoming more responsive to consumer expectations. The capacity of long-established and relatively static accreditation standards to better accommodate changing consumer needs comes into question.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the relationship between accreditation and residential aged care service quality from the perspectives of staff, and offers a nuanced view of “quality” in this setting.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Karen R. Fisher, Xiaoyi Zhang and Max Alston

Some social policy theorists assert that East Asia has a distinct social welfare regime that due to the influence of Confucian values relies on families more than in other…

Abstract

Purpose

Some social policy theorists assert that East Asia has a distinct social welfare regime that due to the influence of Confucian values relies on families more than in other countries. This theorisation has been questioned, partly because it is a static, reductive generalisation. The purpose of this paper is to ask whether this characterisation is relevant to aged care services in Shanghai.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses data from ageing profile statistics, policy documents and ethnographic fieldwork to examine Shanghai aged care services.

Findings

These data show a growing reliance and preference for state aged care service provision to complement family care. It finds that changes in Shanghai aged care services in the last ten years have moved towards a model with similar patterns in high-income countries. It suggests that differences in the service system that were attributed to Confucian values were more likely due to the degree of economic development and internationalisation.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by re-examining the structure of Shanghai’s welfare regime in the context of the dynamic nature of aged care services and preferences of older people.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 38 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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