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1 – 10 of over 112000
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

David J. Sherwin

Suggests new ways to construct and update preventive schedules for a complex system by making better use of system failure down time to do preventive work without further…

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Abstract

Suggests new ways to construct and update preventive schedules for a complex system by making better use of system failure down time to do preventive work without further productive loss. The methodology is based on age renewal but necessarily approximate. However, it includes the recursive effects of maintenance on system MTBF, and of opportunities insufficient to prevent system deterioration. Opportunity maintenance theoretically self‐adjusts; if insufficient opportunities arise, average lateness increases, and failures increase until a balance is achieved, but minimum conditions exist for a given age renewal schedule, and the natural balance may not be economically optimal.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Creative Ageing and the Arts of Care: Reframing Active Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-435-9

Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Gordon Anderson and Rui Fu

Wellbeing evaluation using ordered categorical response data is hazardous given the scale dependent nature of most measures of wellbeing and inequality. Here, scale…

Abstract

Wellbeing evaluation using ordered categorical response data is hazardous given the scale dependent nature of most measures of wellbeing and inequality. Here, scale independent instruments for measuring levels of wellbeing and inequalities between groups in multidimensional ordered categorical environments are introduced and applied in a study of health and consumption wellbeing and the aging process in twenty‐first century China. Urban/rural location, gender, age and the availability of welfare support were considered circumstances in what is in essence a study of equality of opportunity in the acquisition of health and consumption wellbeing in Chinas’ aging population. Older populations are found to experience diminished and increasingly diverse wellbeing outcomes that are, to some extent, ameliorated by welfare support.

Details

Research on Economic Inequality: Poverty, Inequality and Shocks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-558-5

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2022

Birgit Leick, Martin Thomas Falk, Mehtap Aldogan Eklund and Evgueni Vinogradov

This article examines the nature of service provision in the platform-based collaborative economy from the perspective of entrepreneurship theories. It departs from a…

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines the nature of service provision in the platform-based collaborative economy from the perspective of entrepreneurship theories. It departs from a knowledge gap about the individual and contextual determinants of service provision through digital platforms. By exploring these determinants for the service provision in two main sectors of the collaborative economy, transportation and accommodation, the study provides a first conceptual introduction of these activities and their nature for the existing entrepreneurship research.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based upon Eurobarometer microdata (2018), covering 28 European countries with about 27,000 observations, and uses a seemingly unrelated Probit model.

Findings

The likelihood of service provision through platforms in the collaborative economy is highest for individuals aged 25–34 years but decreases continuously with age. Occupation, sex and population density of the place of residence are other relevant determinants. By contrast, the regulatory system and GDP per capita of the region are not relevant.

Research limitations/implications

The findings illuminate the under-studied individual and contextual determinants related to individuals engaging with entrepreneurial activities in the collaborative economy. Future research should investigate the role of previous self-employment, skills and spatial context.

Practical implications

The collaborative economy is still a marginal sector in Europe that is likely to grow bigger. Particularly the young, highly educated entrepreneurial persons located in urban regions may spur this expected growth. Supporting policy measures aimed at this social stratum might foster digital entrepreneurship and contribute to growth in the digital economy.

Originality/value

By exploring the individual and contextual determinants for the service provision in the two main sectors of the platform-based collaborative economy, transportation and accommodation, the study provides a first conceptual introduction of these activities and their nature into existing entrepreneurship research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2018

Hanna Maria Salminen, Qian Wang and Iiris Aaltio

Recently, research on aging in the work-life context from the perspective of how to manage, support and retain an aging workforce has increased among management scholars…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, research on aging in the work-life context from the perspective of how to manage, support and retain an aging workforce has increased among management scholars, and therefore is contributing to the current societal need to extend work careers. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the articles discussing aging in the work-life context in the Finnish business magazine Talouselämä (Economic Life) during the years 2002–2017.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 81 articles were included in the analysis. They were classified into seven themes as a result of a content analysis. Three levels of discussions on aging were identified: societal, organizational and individual. These levels were further analyzed in order to revel what kind of issues have been emphasized or overlooked. The results were discussed in the context of Finnish work life.

Findings

The findings showed that aging has been presented in a passive and deterministic (or at least neutral) tone. Most of the articles focused on the consequences and actions related to an aging workforce at the societal level. At the individual level, aging was mainly discussed in terms of changes related to work ability and functioning, with aging individuals as the actors responsible for managing and controlling the effects of their own aging process. The organizational-level discussion on aging was limited and narrow, mostly lacking any discussion of the role of organizations as responsible actors or from the perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).

Practical implications

Organizations could take a more active and broader role in terms of supporting the longer working careers of older employees. Professional magazines could deal more with “age-aware” research as it relates to organizations, especially the potential and opportunities of the aging workforce. Aging research could promote media level publishing and applications of knowledge.

Originality/value

Few critically oriented management studies have investigated how aging is presented and discussed in business magazines.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Lynne Berry

The purpose of this paper is to put the issue of ageing on the agenda of the English voluntary sector; to support the development of strategies about resourcing…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to put the issue of ageing on the agenda of the English voluntary sector; to support the development of strategies about resourcing, supporting, governing and making relevant the voluntary sector for the next 20 years.

Design/methodology/approach

An independent Commission hosted by New Philanthropy Capital and the International Longevity Centre, funded by the Big Lottery and the Prudential Methodology: issuing a discussion paper, created by the Commissioners and based on futures work and an evidence review; holding national and international seminars and conferences.

Findings

Our ageing society has the potential to lead the voluntary sector into a viable future by building bridges between generations and communities, by expanding the resources available to it through rethinking its workforce, both paid and unpaid, by inspiring and delivering a more integrated and committed sense of social obligations and mutuality – if it embraces “The Age of Opportunity”.

Research limitations/implications

This is a policy and practice led review with implications for the UK voluntary sector, its role in society and its resourcing.

Practical implications

The Commission on the Voluntary Sector & Ageing takes as its basic premise that if we can grasp the potential, we can invest the skills and resources available to us to create a thriving, relevant and creative place for the voluntary sector and civil society. The Commission is setting a challenge to charities and social enterprises. The authors want them to rethink their work so that they can help make Britain a great place to grow old and one that encourages reciprocity between generations and over a lifetime.

Social implications

A more integrated and mutually empowering society that builds on an asset-based model of ageing.

Originality/value

The work of the Commission has never been done before and has been seen as creating an opportunity for rethinking the role, purpose and potential of the voluntary sector.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Cabrini Pak and Ajit Kambil

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to better understand the emerging aging consumer markets. It identifies new principles to better serve the ranks of the

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to better understand the emerging aging consumer markets. It identifies new principles to better serve the ranks of the 50+ consumer market as those segments grow in number and economic influence.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework was developed following industry and literature reviews and analysis of secondary data from the Social Security Administration, Census Bureau, US Department of Labor, UN Population Division, and AARP.

Findings

Demographics point to a significant rise in the importance and complexity of consumer markets in the age 50+ segments. There are psychological, social, economic and biological changes that affect the spending habits and priorities of these consumers and, while there are excellent examples of companies taking these factors into account in designing products and services, it is clear that we have only begun to consider how best to serve aging and generally affluent consumers.

Practical implications

The aging consumer is rapidly moving from being something of a cursory footnote on corporate product/service plans to being a dominant market force. Companies with a deep understanding of the unique needs and priorities of the age 50+ segments, and which design products and services informed by this understanding, will gain a significant competitive advantage over those that overlook these characteristics and preferences.

Originality/value

This article provides both a framework for companies to assess the needs of the emerging 50+ consumer market, as well as examples of companies that have begun to innovate with an eye toward serving this increasingly complex and well‐heeled population.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

J. Brandon McKelvey

Globalization has speeded the flow of development across borders, encouraging the movement of both labour and capital. Although it has been well‐documented that labour is…

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Abstract

Purpose

Globalization has speeded the flow of development across borders, encouraging the movement of both labour and capital. Although it has been well‐documented that labour is less flexible than capital and that unskilled labour is disadvantaged by these trends, the impact of globalization on older workers has been largely ignored. The critical gerontology perspective can contribute through its focus on globalization's effects on labour market opportunities and social welfare benefits. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a theoretical paper on ageing.

Findings

This paper examines four issues faced by older workers in an international context in order to more fully understand the differential impact of globalization by age. First, the paradigm of globalization assumes a youthful labour force willing and able to relocate search of employment opportunities, criteria inapplicable to many older workers. Second, human capital inequalities produce differing opportunities for older workers to respond to economic changes. Third, existing social welfare provisions are relatively durable and likely to affect older people in complex ways. Fourth, varied levels of international development and life course possibilities produce differences between countries and regions.

Originality/value

This paper is original in highlighting how a lifetime of constraints placed upon older workers by their moral and political economies make their integration into the idealized global market difficult and pose larger questions about understanding the life course in a global context.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Firano Zakaria and Doughmi Salawa

There is a wealth of literature on the financing structure of a company. For this reason, the authors considered it useful to present a theoretical and empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a wealth of literature on the financing structure of a company. For this reason, the authors considered it useful to present a theoretical and empirical literature review of classical and new theories of the financial structure. The purpose of this study is to realize on a panel of 15 nonfinancial Moroccan companies listed on the Casablanca Stock Exchange, over a period of 11 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The results obtained indicate that only a few variables from financial theory have an important role in the financing policy of Moroccan companies. The authors have presented the positive role of size and self-financing on the debt ratio. The analysis of the effects of profitability shows in this study that it is negative related on the debt ratio which asserts the predictions of the pecking order theory. Also, the age of the company and the growth opportunities explain the level of indebtedness.

Findings

Econometric analysis is used to ascertain the nature of the financial structure of listed companies. For this purpose, a large number of companies listed on the Casablanca stock exchange were used.

Originality/value

The authors have presented the positive role of size and self-financing on the debt ratio. Regarding the influence of profitability, this analysis shows that it is negative related on the debt ratio which asserts the predictions of the pecking order theory. Also, the age of the company and the growth opportunities explain the level of indebtedness.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Ken Peattie and Linda Peters

Recent developments in the field of information technology (IT) have led commentators to announce the arrival of a third age of computing in which the computers themselves…

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Abstract

Recent developments in the field of information technology (IT) have led commentators to announce the arrival of a third age of computing in which the computers themselves are being overshadowed by the communications capabilities they provide for individuals and companies. This emphasis on communication places IT at the centre of the marketing agenda as never before, and it is allowing computers to move from tools which support the planning, execution and control of marketing strategies to become integral to the external and internal relationships which marketers must manage. Although the marketing implications of emerging electronic or virtual markets are being discussed, the implications for the management of the marketing mix are often being overlooked. Already many innovative companies are taking advantage of the new generation of technologies to enhance or re‐engineer key elements of the marketing mix, giving marketing a leading role in introducing companies to the revolutionary world of third age computing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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