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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2017

Chris McGoldrick, Giles Andrew Barrett and Ian Cook

The purpose of this paper is to share the findings of a research evaluation into a Befriending and Re-ablement Service (BARS) which offers a host of positive outcomes such…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the findings of a research evaluation into a Befriending and Re-ablement Service (BARS) which offers a host of positive outcomes such as reduced loneliness and keeping as well as possible for a growing segment of the world’s population. The recent increase in longevity is one of humanity’s great success stories. But ageing comes at a price, and decision takers worry about the stresses and strains of an ageing society.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a literature review, this paper presents the findings of an evaluation of an alternative innovative form of support for older people, namely BARS, that has been developed on Merseyside. Semi- and unstructured interviews were carried out with stakeholders including service users and carers. A cost-benefit analysis is also reported. Finally the theoretical and policy implications of this research are explored.

Findings

Befriending and re-ablement officers is both a socially and economically cost effective means of enhancing independent living among older people, reducing loneliness and isolation that can contribute to ill health. The research shows that funding for the BARS scheme should be sustained and expanded, despite or because of the current era of cutbacks in UK and international service provision.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the value, role and importance of both befriending and re-ablement in a time of acute public and voluntary sector funding pressures. The paper is of value to a range of stakeholder groups such as older people, local and central governments and health care commissioners.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Robert Francis Hesketh

This paper aims to discuss the emergence of the contemporary Urban Street Gang (USG) on Merseyside. In terms of gang scholarship in the UK, Merseyside has been greatly…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the emergence of the contemporary Urban Street Gang (USG) on Merseyside. In terms of gang scholarship in the UK, Merseyside has been greatly neglected despite regular reports in national mainstream media that suggest Merseyside USGs represent some of the most criminally active and violent members in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A specific methodology has been omitted because the author while providing a viewpoint from Hesketh (2018), also wishes to encapsulate observations from the remaining two pieces of research conducted on Merseyside (Smithson et al., 2009; Robinson, 2018). For this reason, a summary of the methods used in each of the three studies is provided.

Findings

The paper will highlight observations drawn from all three research studies that were prevalent with USG members throughout the Merseyside county at the time of each study. They include aspects surrounding territoriality, belonging and identity through dress style as well as USG structures and motivation for joining. In particular, the paper will address also address the role of drugs which has transformed the structural make-up of many Merseyside USGs from relatively loosely knit-street corner groups involved in anti-social behaviour (ASB) to more structural-deviant entrepreneurial enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

The paper calls for more research to be carried out on Merseyside. Limitations would include the omission of young women in each of the three studies.

Practical implications

The practical implications are as follows: a need to focus on the impact of bridging within excluded communities; a need to focus on emphasising that drug dealing is a crime that carries serious consequences, and not a form of work (grafting); a need to focus on young women and criminal involvement; and a need to concentrate on developing strategies that counter the allure and attraction of risk-taking behaviour.

Social implications

The paper addresses the impact of social exclusion and the need for equality to counter young people becoming involved in criminality and gangs as well as adult organised crime groups.

Originality/value

The paper is based on what have been so far the only three in-depth studies carried out on Merseyside.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Eric Glasgow

Presents a short study, based on primary sources, of the origins in 1884‐1887 of the Public Library in Bootle, Merseyside, now part of the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton

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228

Abstract

Presents a short study, based on primary sources, of the origins in 1884‐1887 of the Public Library in Bootle, Merseyside, now part of the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton, but up to 1974 a separate borough, adjacent to Liverpool. Includes references to Liverpool’s own Victorian enthusiasm for public libraries, largely dependent on W.E. Gladstone and Sir James Picton, as well as to the more local generation of interest in such matters by Dr R. Tudor and others. The history is outlined up to the year 1901.

Details

Library Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Eric Glasgow

Presents a short study of the evolution of public libraries in Liverpool, especially asa major contribution to the civic culture of the Victorian city. Provides a brief…

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400

Abstract

Presents a short study of the evolution of public libraries in Liverpool, especially as a major contribution to the civic culture of the Victorian city. Provides a brief survey of the availability of reading materials before William Ewart and the idea of the public library emerged after 1850. Outlines Liverpool’s pioneering progress in this field, beginning in 1852, and culminating in its “Brown Library” (1860), and its “Picton Library” (1879). Also provides a history of Liverpool’s Branch Libraries, fostered by the generosity of Andrew Carnegie. Concludes with references to W.E. Gladstone as a promoter of the nation‐wide movement for public libraries.

Details

Library Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Alison Rothwell

Interviews with 120 residents of Southportare examined, suggesting that the generalpublic does not subscribe to the image oflibrarians often given by the media…

Abstract

Interviews with 120 residents of Southport are examined, suggesting that the general public does not subscribe to the image of librarians often given by the media, as evidenced by the more positive epithets frequently used to describe library staff. However, staff of reference libraries are not always held in such high esteem and it is recommended that this aspect of service should be addressed with a view to breaking down the reluctance of members of the public to avail themselves of staff assistance.

Details

Library Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1939

Liverpool Conference was amongst the largest, as it was amongst the most successful, of recent years. In all but the weather it excelled, and there were fine intervals…

Abstract

Liverpool Conference was amongst the largest, as it was amongst the most successful, of recent years. In all but the weather it excelled, and there were fine intervals even in that. We publish the “Letters on our Affairs” by our well known correspondent, Callimachus, so far as it covers the first three days; the conclusion will follow next month, with what futcher comments seem to be necessary. The Annual Business Meeting was a little less rowdy than that at Scarborough, but one thing emerged from it and that was the determination of the A.A.L. to survive independently. There is more in this than meets the eye, and discussion on it may be postponed until a calmer mood prevails on all sides.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Giles Barrett and Christine McGoldrick

Ageing populations are national and global phenomena. These older residents are likely to be among the most disadvantaged nationally and in comparison with younger…

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Abstract

Purpose

Ageing populations are national and global phenomena. These older residents are likely to be among the most disadvantaged nationally and in comparison with younger neighbours. The benefits of active ageing are attracting attention from policy makers globally, as it is increasingly recognised that age‐friendly cities encourage active ageing. Resources to sustain active ageing are becoming scarce. Older people's health, social activity, needs, aspirations and the barriers to realising them are at the centre of this investigation. The purpose of this paper is to explore inclusion and exclusion within some of England's most deprived areas.

Design/methodology/approach

Between 2002‐2007, over 600 older Liverpool people, key informants and policy makers in five of Liverpool's poorest electoral wards were consulted via semi‐structured questionnaires, key informant interviews and focus groups about their needs and aspirations.

Findings

Barriers to active ageing arose primarily from participants' poverty, ill‐health and deprivation, poor neighbourhoods, ageism, and insecure, gendered, racialised and sectarian space.

Originality/value

This in‐depth investigation into active ageing consulted over 600 older people in some of Liverpool's poorest neighbourhoods. In disseminating knowledge of Liverpool's situation, the paper adds significantly to knowledge around the severe challenges to active ageing in localities characterised by multiple deprivation.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 33 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1950

EVEN if library work with the young is the most written, and over‐written, subject in librarianship as is sometimes alleged, it still is the foundation of all library…

Abstract

EVEN if library work with the young is the most written, and over‐written, subject in librarianship as is sometimes alleged, it still is the foundation of all library activity and must therefore come under continuous review. To some the subject is as dull as the essay questions set in the Entrance Examinations were alleged to be by a writer in The Library Assistant. To which we reply that all things have a certain dullness to those without sufficient imagination to look at them in other than the most conventional darkness. A Chesterton discourses entrancingly on a piece of chalk and brown paper, an empty train, a piece of string. So with our subject. We therefore make no other apology than this for a number of THE LIBRARY WORLD in which it is our main interest. Our children's libraries are, as yet, far from perfect; they issue too many drivelling books written by authors whose first essays in writing are children's books because they think them to be the easiest to write. The difference between a Ransome and—well, a thousand slush children's books—is as great as the difference between The Vicar of Wakefield and worst railway bookstall novelette. There is a great field being examined here by the more progressive children's librarians. There are many other questions, administrative and personal that have been and are under discussion. The writer of Letters on Our Affairs this month deals with some of these although, we may at once say, his views are not wholly those of THE LIBRARY WORLD.

Details

New Library World, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Daniel Pearson

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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