Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Alfred Bork

Adult continuing education will be of increasing importance, as the median age of our society and the pace of change continue to increase. The paper begins with an…

Downloads
5670

Abstract

Adult continuing education will be of increasing importance, as the median age of our society and the pace of change continue to increase. The paper begins with an examination of the goals of all learning. It focuses on a new paradigm for learning, tried so far only on a very limited basis: computer‐based tutorial learning, considered particularly important for adult learning. This paradigm, practical today with modern technology, allows a much more individualized approach to learning than is largely available today, for very large numbers at much lower total costs than at present. Student interaction with the computer will be frequent (every few seconds) and in the student’s native language. Little large‐scale experience is available with such highly interactive material, so we should begin with extensive experimental efforts in this direction. A large worldwide developmental effort in many languages would follow successful research.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Godfrey Maleko Munguatosha, Paul Birevu Muyinda and Jude Thaddeus Lubega

The purpose of this paper is to establish a model for adopting social networked learning in higher institutions of learning in developing countries of Africa.

Downloads
3312

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a model for adopting social networked learning in higher institutions of learning in developing countries of Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods research methodology involving survey and interviews was adopted in the collection of data for building the model. The model was theoretically underpinned by the Technology Acceptance Model and the social constructivist learning theory, and was built and validated using structural equation modelling and Delphi techniques respectively.

Findings

Adoption of social networked learning in developing countries of Africa requires self efficacy, reliable technical and administrative support, infrastructure, system interactivity, adequate budgeting and accountability, and a flexible organisational culture.

Practical implications

The model provides a framework for integrating social software tools with the traditional learning systems of developing countries of Africa. This has a positive outcome of providing social constructivist information and communication technology (ICT) supported learning at low or no cost.

Social implications

The model has the potential to encourage formation of communities of practice to encourage development of social learning and a student‐centered pedagogy.

Originality/value

The novelty of this research lies in the extension of the traditional technology acceptance models with constructs for proper budgeting and accountability and organisational culture. Time and other resources need to be devoted to developing social networked learning and the model takes this into account.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Meena Chavan and Leanne Carter

The purpose of this paper is to explore the expectations and reality perspectives accrued in a preliminary management course and understand if they impart and embed…

Downloads
1533

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the expectations and reality perspectives accrued in a preliminary management course and understand if they impart and embed real-world skills and develop work readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data collected for the research were qualitative. A total of six focus groups were conducted with a total of 52 students enrolled at a large metropolitan university in Australia. NViVO was used to code and analyse the data.

Findings

The study found that at the commencement of university studies, the expectations were simple like, making new friends, getting around the campus and settling well into the university culture, which over time extended to getting a part-time job, securing internships, memberships of associations, desire to participate in exchange programs and get work-ready by the close of the first year. The research outcomes show that those who held a part-time job while studying demonstrated a better understanding of the preliminary management subject matter taught in class and obtained better grades. Primarily, the preliminary management course did not specifically impart work-ready skills and it would be fitting to embed employability skills in the management curriculum from the commencement of their programs in the first year.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative research is used to comprehend a research problem from the outlook perspectives of the local population it involves. The limitations of this methodology includes no objectively verifiable result, adept interviewing skills for interviewers, slow and time consuming during interviewing process and intensive category process also as qualitative inquiry is normally open-ended, the participants have more control over the content of the data collected.

Practical implications

The lack of skill mismatch and graduates who are not work-ready incurs significant economic and social costs. A number of policy implications emerge due to university-labour market links and skills mismatches and the impact on students and the labour market. The rise in unemployment and the skills mismatch seen after the economic crisis requires immediate attention. Job creation is crucial but so is the need to develop graduate with appropriate matching skills and qualities to do the job. Mandatory internships, apprenticeships and on-the-job training for university students would help. Governments can provide financial incentives and subsidies to organisations providing the above services and working cooperatively with the universities to get students work-ready. Universities must raise the educational requirements over time as jobs become more complex. Universities can build communities of practice with the assistance of this scheme to enable students to interact with the industry professionals. An additional year of vocational training could be recommended for the graduating students. This would help the young graduates to get work-related skills. Wheelahan et al. (2015) state that building better links between education and work can help provide a more rational approach to vocational development. They propose the use of vocational streams and productive capabilities in the education system and labour market to achieve this.

Social implications

This requires a combined effort from all stakeholders. A systematic approach needs to be adopted. First, the gap between the knowledge provided by the universities and the skills required by the employers need to be reduced. Second, the employers and the universities should keep a watch on the labour market and develop strategies to meet the dynamic requirements of the labour market collaboratively. Third, career guidance will help inform students make a career choice to match the labour market opportunities. This should be a part of the policy agenda for responding to the lack of work-ready graduates in the labour market.

Originality/value

Learning and teaching activities must include industry interface and engagement right from the first year at university. The main findings from this research indicated the need for better understanding of first-year students’ expectations. The two significant student expectations that emerged were “need for collaborations” and “industry interface”.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Alexis Linoski, Sofia Slutskaya and Elizabeth Holdsworth

For the past several years, libraries have been evolving. The traditional academic library housed print collections and provided space for studying, usually quiet space…

Abstract

For the past several years, libraries have been evolving. The traditional academic library housed print collections and provided space for studying, usually quiet space. With the advances in technology, libraries have had their own metamorphosis. No longer are they constrained by a physical space – they now have virtual spaces, which include virtual collections.

During this same time, the cost of higher education and textbooks has been on the rise. Universities and the federal government have enacted policies and laws in an effort to combat these rising costs. In support of the students and affordable textbook initiatives, libraries have become partners in helping lower the cost of textbooks for students through either purchasing them electronically or other means, such as course reserves. Indeed, a single library purchase can now provide course materials for an entire class.

This chapter will present an overview of the Affordable Learning Georgia Initiative and how the Georgia Tech Library has updated their collection development policies to support this initiative.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Dag Håkon Haneberg

The COVID-19 pandemic has entailed a critical situation for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) since restrictions on business activity have been imposed by…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has entailed a critical situation for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) since restrictions on business activity have been imposed by authorities to reduce infections. The result is that SME managers must manage their firms through a crisis under very challenging conditions. The purpose of the present paper is to address how SME managers respond in the second “wave” of COVID-19 based on their perceived uncertainty as well as eventual learning from the first “wave” in early 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

Four hypotheses are presented, resulting in a theoretical model relating crisis impact, uncertainty, learning from crisis experience and effectuation behaviour. The theoretical model is tested through an empirical questionnaire-based quantitative study of Norwegian SMEs in the bar and restaurant sector, applying structural equation modelling as the analytical technique.

Findings

The results show that impact from COVID-19 leads to both uncertainty and learning and further that uncertainty primarily leads to a focus on affordable loss while learning leads to experimentation behaviour.

Originality/value

The present paper is novel in several ways. First, it empirically studies a unique situation where a crisis encompasses two “waves” of significant impact on the firms in focus. This provides the opportunity to address managers' learning through a crisis for application in a very similar situation later. Second, the present paper provides an empirically supported model of how uncertainty or learning leads to different dimensions of effectuation behaviour in a crisis situation.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Christina Riehman-Murphy, Victoria Raish, Emily Mross, Andrea Pritt and Elizabeth Nelson

This paper aims to describe a case study of the open and affordable educational resources (OAER) initiatives led by Penn State University Libraries (UL) and implemented at…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a case study of the open and affordable educational resources (OAER) initiatives led by Penn State University Libraries (UL) and implemented at its many campuses which are designed to address the challenges students experience accessing and funding their course materials.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study will show how a broad administrative mandate for high-level OAER initiatives created the environment for Penn State (PSU) to evolve from individual pioneering units into coordinated university-wide initiatives. This shift, spearheaded by administration with strong UL involvement, allowed for customized and targeted initiatives at its many campuses. By using UL’s centralized, but geographically dispersed, structure, library faculty and staff have been supported in their efforts to expand OAER from the ground up to meet individual contexts and campus needs.

Findings

As a result of its many open and affordable initiatives, PSUL has been able to demonstrate both savings and increased access for students across PSU’s many campuses and World Campus. Broad administrative support has created an environment which enabled UL faculty and staff to lead various initiatives.

Originality/value

UL has long been a leader and partner in open and affordability initiatives at PSU because of its core mission of providing access. By sharing the processes and logistics of how a large research institution with many campuses of various sizes implemented a wide variety of library-driven open and affordability initiatives through a centralized but geographically dispersed structure, academic libraries will be able to replicate similar initiatives in their unique contexts.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

David Crick and James Crick

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how decision making and learning are related to marketing planning among owner/managers with lifestyle in comparison to…

Downloads
1014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how decision making and learning are related to marketing planning among owner/managers with lifestyle in comparison to growth-oriented objectives in the New Zealand wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports on 12 interviews with owner/managers of New Zealand vineyards. The vineyards were small to medium sized and independently owned to avoid bias from parent company decision making within larger scale corporate wine producers.

Findings

Different degrees of causation and effectuation-based decision making were found to exist among owner/managers starting from the nascent stage in their respective marketing planning processes. Learning to different degrees was evident in order to remain competitive in a climate of uncertainty and not least of which due to problematic exchange rates. An important issue influencing decision making was whether owner/managers were running the vineyard to maintain a lifestyle or a growth strategy; an issue affecting perceptions of risks and rewards.

Originality/value

The originality of the study is that it employs an effectuation lens in respect of the marketing planning process; specifically, decision making among owner/managers with differing objectives, experience and perceptions of risks and rewards.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Luyi Li, Yanlin Zheng, Hiroaki Ogata and Yoneo Yano

The impact of Ubiquitous Computing on Learning is not confined within technical dimension. Besides its technical facilitation, this new computing paradigm also challenges…

Abstract

The impact of Ubiquitous Computing on Learning is not confined within technical dimension. Besides its technical facilitation, this new computing paradigm also challenges human’s belief on learning, and compels us to rethink on the design of learning resources and environments. The paper explores the concept of Ubiquitous Learning, and proposes a conceptual framework for a Ubiquitous Learning Environment (ULE) design and implementation. A ULE is established on the combination between Real World and Virtual Space, Personal Space and Shared Space. Learning in a ULE is conducted in the interactions among three essential communicative elements: Social Human, Object in real world, and Artifact in virtual space. A learning process is a social transfer process between tacit and explicit knowledge. Context‐Awareness is indispensable to all kinds of interactions in a ULE. In particular, this paper gives a discussion to context‐awareness supported Interoperability and Adaptability in a ULE, and suggests a five‐dimensional (Who, What, How, When, Where) representation approach for modeling context and providing context‐awareness information. In the practical dimension, this paper presents a design framework for a ULE implementation by integrating the applications of present affordable learning devices, such as networked PCs (Personal Computer), PDAs (Personal Digital Assistant), mobile phones, sensors, and RFIDs. A basic learning system architecture in a ULE and a prototype ubiquitous language learning system are also addressed in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Jan P. Tucker and Gary R. Gentry

This paper aims to clarify the challenges faced by higher education institutions such as budget cuts and the pressure to offer accessible, affordable anytime/anyplace

Downloads
3045

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the challenges faced by higher education institutions such as budget cuts and the pressure to offer accessible, affordable anytime/anyplace learning and offer a solution in the form of the development of an e‐learning strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores recent research on higher education and e‐learning strategies in an effort to offer a participatory pedagogy coupled with cost effective technology as a solution to overcoming the increase in market demand and socioeconomic pressures facing higher education institutions.

Findings

The paper provides pragmatic insights about the five stages of developing an e‐learning strategy, including determining the delivery method and technology, making curriculum and development decisions, integrating implementation and roll out strategies and monitoring and evaluating the new e‐programs.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen research offers an approach as a starting point for developing an e‐learning strategy. Further research may be needed to generalize and apply the suggestions to individual higher education institutions.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for higher education institutions and other organizations wishing to explore the option of e‐learning as a delivery system for knowledge, training and instruction.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the implications of technology on learning.

Details

Foresight, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a one‐stop shop to deliver blended learning for crew, volunteers and staff of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a one‐stop shop to deliver blended learning for crew, volunteers and staff of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the reasons for developing the new system, the form it takes and the results it has achieved.

Findings

The paper explains that resources are now classified by RNLI competencies, with key ones linked to personal‐development plans. Staff can add performance goals and link these to relevant courses. Crew can see their training‐assessment status and service history. And other volunteers have development plans guiding them to recommended courses and resources.

Practical implications

The paper reveals that, in the first ten weeks alone, more than 1,000 people used the new system, compared with the previous annual average of 300.

Social implications

The paper highlights the role of the Charity Learning Consortium in bringing together more than 100 charities, housing associations and not‐for‐profit organizations to make e‐learning more affordable and effective.

Originality/value

The paper provides eight tips for e‐learning success.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 9000